[OT] Salmon and Fish Jumping

Talath

Explorer
As I was watching a friend's fish in the tank, he said that fish can jump and I told him it's impossible. I argued with him, because my elementary school science teacher explained it to me and I always believed in it. He explained it as thus:

Around spring, water becomes depolarized and fish become polarized due to subtle shifts in the magnetism of the earths core. Around spring, these factors weaken gravitys hold on fish, allowing them to jump upward at great length. An otherwise impossible feat.

So, can fish just jump, or is my science teacher correct?
 

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kengar

First Post
Around spring, water becomes depolarized and fish become polarized due to subtle shifts in the magnetism of the earths core. Around spring, these factors weaken gravitys hold on fish, allowing them to jump upward at great length. An otherwise impossible feat.

uhhh. I'm no physicist or icthyologist (sp?) but that sounds pretty nuts to me.

What about fish that jump at other times of the year like flying fish (I know they have "wing-fin" thingies, but they gotta get out of the water somehow don't they?)

Also, what about aquatic mammals like dolphins that jump all the time, their bodies aren't that different from a fish's in shape.
 

Aeolius

Adventurer
Try keeping a wrasse in an open-topped saltwater tank. It doesn't matter what time of year it is; the fish will jump out of the tank. I have lost many fairy wrasses because of this.

On a side note, needlefish have been known to leap from the water and impale nearby swimmers.
 

Harlock

First Post
Duh, of course a fish can jump. I can prove it by looking at only the first four definitions on www.dictionary.com

1. To spring off the ground or other base by a muscular effort of the legs and feet.

Okay, by this definition a fish cannot jump. Fish live in water, not on the ground for the most part and do not have legs AND feet.

2. To move suddenly and in one motion: jumped out of bed.

This at first sounds like a fish can jump. I mean they always move suddenly and in a smooth motion. Ever seen those schools of fish responding almost as one giant entity to a threat? But we call that swimming, do we not? Yes.

3. To move involuntarily, as in surprise: jumped when the phone rang.

As this really isn't jumping as defined by the original poster, we'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

4. To parachute from an aircraft.

Here is where we see that a fish can indeed jump and it has nothing to do with depolarization and magnetism. You can give a fish, ANY fish a parachute and push it out of an aircraft and it has jumped. I rest my case.
 

Datt

First Post
Have you never been to a Sea World type place where they had dolphins? They jump all the time in thier shows. They jump over people, they jump up to get a fish being held by a trainer.
Yes fish can jump.

As to the explanation that your friend gave he is talking about how Salmon swim up stream in the spring since the northern waters aren't as hot as the southern waters. And yes they also can jump. They jump to get over rocks and small cliffs in the stream. It is really a cool site to see. I know there is a comercial going around right now, can't remember for what though, that shows fish jumping out of water and a bear grabbing one just as it leaves the water. That is how Bears "fish" during the spring.
 

Harlock

First Post
Datt said:
Have you never been to a Sea World type place where they had dolphins? They jump all the time in thier shows. They jump over people, they jump up to get a fish being held by a trainer.
Yes fish can jump.

Umm, excuse me for interrupting, but dolphins are not fish. It took only one definition from www.dictionary.com to refute your claim that they are.

1. Any of various marine cetacean mammals, such as the bottle-nosed dolphin, of the family Delphinidae, related to the whales but generally smaller and having a beaklike snout. (emphasis added.)
 

redknight

First Post
The dolphin (delphinidae) is not a fish. However the dolphin is also a fish related to the more common perch.


1. sea animal related to whales: an intelligent marine mammal (cetacean) that resembles a large fish and has teeth and a snout similar to a beak. Found almost worldwide, dolphins are related to whales but are smaller. Family Delphinidae.


2. large marine game fish: a large sea fish of the perch family, popular as a game fish, that has a long dorsal fin, high blunt forehead, and a brilliant green, blue, and yellow body. Latin name Coryphaena hippurusCoryphaena equisetis. Also called dolphinfish Also called dorado
 

Harlock

First Post
redknight said:
The dolphin (delphinidae) is not a fish. However the dolphin is also a fish related to the more common perch.


1. sea animal related to whales: an intelligent marine mammal (cetacean) that resembles a large fish and has teeth and a snout similar to a beak. Found almost worldwide, dolphins are related to whales but are smaller. Family Delphinidae.


2. large marine game fish: a large sea fish of the perch family, popular as a game fish, that has a long dorsal fin, high blunt forehead, and a brilliant green, blue, and yellow body. Latin name Coryphaena hippurusCoryphaena equisetis. Also called dolphinfish Also called dorado

Yes yes, but the fellow was obviously referring to the Sea World trained dolphins which are in fact mammals and therefore not at all a fish and hence not relative to this discussion of fish-jumping.
 

Kilmore

First Post
Let's let your science teacher play a character in one of my seafaring games. We'll see who jumps quicker, him or the fish. :D
 


Datt

First Post
Yes I know dolphins are not an actual fish, but are mammals. I was trying to make a point. But since that failed here try this one:

From Why do Mullets jump?
Over the years there have been numerous theories concerning the leaping of mullet. There seems to be two categories of leaping: predator avoidance and aerial respiration.

Leaping to avoid predators usually involves more than one fish jumping simultaneously, retaining an upright posture and entering the water cleanly.

The second type of leaping involves a single fish that does a slower, shorter leap, often flipping onto its side or even onto its back. They may also roll at the surface or move with their head above the water.

And to save you the time:
From www.dictionary.com

1. Any of various stout-bodied, edible fishes of the family Mugilidae, found worldwide in tropical and temperate coastal waters and some freshwater streams. :)
 

Harlock

First Post
Datt said:
Yes I know dolphins are not an actual fish, but are mammals. I was trying to make a point. But since that failed here try this one:



And to save you the time:
From www.dictionary.com

1. Any of various stout-bodied, edible fishes of the family Mugilidae, found worldwide in tropical and temperate coastal waters and some freshwater streams. :)

I already said fish can jump. Saying so again is redundant.
 


Pielorinho

Iron Fist of Pelor
Talath said:
Around spring, water becomes depolarized and fish become polarized due to subtle shifts in the magnetism of the earths core. Around spring, these factors weaken gravitys hold on fish, allowing them to jump upward at great length. An otherwise impossible feat.

This is correct, and you can prove it to yourself. Get a fish from a market (the fresher the better -- but for humane reasons, don't use one of the fish from your tropical aquarium). If you stroke it along its belly with a magnet, always going in the same direction, after about a dozen strokes, the fish will be so polarized that you can actually stick it to your refrigerator.

I've tried it and it works -- freaked the heck out of my family when I showed them.

It only works in early Spring, though, as your science teacher told you. Usually the effect is most pronounced about ten days after the Spring Equinox.

Try it tomorrow; I'm just getting an early start by telling you today.

Daniel
 

jdavis

First Post
barsoomcore said:
Mullets can jump? That's sure to be a source of stress to their owners.

I had a mullet in the late 80's and it was really freaky when it would jump off my head and attack people. Had to do with the unbalanced cut of the hair.

Back to fish, the answer is yes fish can jump, there is no need for dictionary definitions or distinctions about mammels or perch. Fish can jump out of the water, some are better at it than others.
 

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Mercule

Adventurer
jdavis said:

Back to fish, the answer is yes fish can jump, there is no need for dictionary definitions or distinctions about mammels or perch. Fish can jump out of the water, some are better at it than others.

Wow! There's a scary sight. And something I hope never to see live.
 




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