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D&D 5E Other names for halflings

Einlanzer0

Explorer
I'm knowledgeable about its origin in D&D, but the word "halfling" always seems like a pejorative used by by bigger people rather than an acceptable name for the race. I think mostly this comes from its descriptive nature (only dragonborn are similar, and, frankly, I don't like that name either). Are there better terms for halflings used in different campaign settings? I remember the Kender of Dragonlance, but they are technically not the same race. I'm just curious about what insights other people have.
 

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Yeah that always bothered me, too. Just because "hobbit" is vetoed, doesn't make "halfling" work well, especially in the sense that the race would call themselves that. "Hin" works (although I suspect it's lifted from Hîn or Chîn which is Sindarin for "children", so, still a Tolkien fallback.

I have mused before about the offspring of an elf and a human being a halfling, which would make sense name-wise.

To go full Tolkien and inspire from Old English;

ríce Strong Neuter Noun ja-stem
realm 1. power authority reign referring to sovereigns or to others in authority 2. the district in which power is exercised a kingdom realm diocese 3. the people inhabiting a district a nation

frumcynn Strong Neuter Noun
ancestry origin descent lineage race tribe
frumcynn Singular Plural
Nominative (the/that þæt) frumcynn (the/those þá) frumcynn
Accusative (the/that þæt) frumcynn (the/those þá) frumcynn
Genitive (the/that þæs) frumcynnes (the/those þára) frumcynna
Dative (the/that þæm) frumcynne (the/those þæm) frumcynnum

cynd Strong Neuter Noun
origin generation birth race species place by nature nature kind property quality character offspring gender genitalia
cynd Singular Plural
Nominative (the/that þæt) cynd (the/those þá) cynd
Accusative (the/that þæt) cynd (the/those þá) cynd
Genitive (the/that þæs) cyndes (the/those þára) cynda
Dative

Have a play here: http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk
 



ríce Strong Neuter Noun ja-stem
realm 1. power authority reign referring to sovereigns or to others in authority 2. the district in which power is exercised a kingdom realm diocese 3. the people inhabiting a district a nation
This is the same word as modern English "rich" and German "Reich".

frumcynn Strong Neuter Noun
ancestry origin descent lineage race tribe
frumcynn Singular Plural
Nominative (the/that þæt) frumcynn (the/those þá) frumcynn
Accusative (the/that þæt) frumcynn (the/those þá) frumcynn
Genitive (the/that þæs) frumcynnes (the/those þára) frumcynna
Dative (the/that þæm) frumcynne (the/those þæm) frumcynnum
"Frum" is actually not modern English "from", but the meaning is close enough that I'd happily translate this as "From-kin". Names using "-kin" seem to be popular for definitely-not-hobbits. In Magic: the Gathering, they're "Kithkin".

cynd Strong Neuter Noun
origin generation birth race species place by nature nature kind property quality character offspring gender genitalia
cynd Singular Plural
Nominative (the/that þæt) cynd (the/those þá) cynd
Accusative (the/that þæt) cynd (the/those þá) cynd
Genitive (the/that þæs) cyndes (the/those þára) cynda
Dative
Modern English "kind". Got Hamlet on the brain, do we?
 
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Hriston

Dungeon Master of Middle-earth
The term "halfling" goes back to Tolkien as well, and is a translation of the Sindarin periannath. "Hobbit" is itself a translation of their name for themselves, which means "hole builder". In the original Westron, the name is "Kuduk".
 

The term "halfling" goes back to Tolkien as well, and is a translation of the Sindarin periannath. "Hobbit" is itself a translation of their name for themselves, which means "hole builder". In the original Westron, the name is "Kuduk".
All after-the-fact etymologizing, as I understand it. Tolkien wrote "In a hole in the ground there lived a Hobbit" and only later set about figuring out where that word came from.

(The dirty little secret of Tolkien's language construction is that he actually did this sort of thing a lot. Well, I say "dirty" -- really I think it makes him and his process much more approachable.)
 
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Patrick McGill

First Post
I like calling them something-folk. Like Kindfolk, Goodfolk, etc. In my homebrew world, the river-nomad halflings of the Westbearn call themselves the Peltauch, but everyone else calls them the "riverfolk". Real original, right?
 

GreenTengu

Adventurer
In Greyhawk, halflings are called hobniz

Considering hobgoblins are goblins that are 2-4x the size of regular goblins and considerably more civilized, productive, cooperative and longer lived, if Halflings are hobnizes, then I really got to wonder what a Niz is.

I am thinking some sort of pixie-sized short-lived beings who are unapologetically Chaotic Neutral and just generally far too small and foolish to be any sort of threat to anyone except to drive people insane through their annoying and disruptive behavior....

Like tiny Kender!
 



GuardianLurker

Explorer
In my world, the "hobbits" live in the Shires of Acune. Their official name was Acuna. With the subraces of H'acuna, S'acuna, and T'acuna.

Basically, I named their nation, then named them. Do it right, and it all flows together.
 

Illithidbix

Explorer
"Shin Kickers"
"Ankle Biters"
"Hamstringers"
"Punt people"
"Foot stools"
"Trip hazards"
"Icklegits"
"Aggghr you little bugger"
"Where did that short **** go?"
"Hairyfooted anger mice"
 


paintphob

First Post
For my homebrew it is Hauflin. It literally translates to "all family" (hauf + lin) in their native tongue. They will also say "the Lin", if they are being quick, which they usually are not.
It was corrupted to Haflin by the Dwarfs. When Humans heard it, they changed it yet again, to Halfling. The reason was two fold. First, Humans assumed the Dwarfs dropped the 'g' from the end of the word, as they are want to do. Second, it seemed to 'fit', based on the little ones size.
Most Halflings don't care enough to correct any of the Big Folk.
 

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