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5E Previews of Rime of the Frostmaiden

IGN has posted a preview of Rime of the Frostmaiden, including some preview pages (I've put one below). They will also be posting more previews tomorrow!

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HawaiiSteveO

Explorer
Fingers really crossed that the book is well organized, as well as easy to read and play without a lot of DM prep.

I don't have all the adventures, but see each release is slightly better than the one before it in this regard. Still, the extra page count on this one could be awesome or just pages of filler... maybe it's just me :rolleyes:

Still, pretty pumped to see book and really curious as this appears to have a different vibe!
 

Parmandur

Legend
I'm not familiar with it, can you give a brief outline of how it works?

I do "pacing XP". Basically, how fast do I want the group to level up? Say it's once ever 5 session. Divide the amount of XP by 5, and voila! Faffing about, not much done session? Give less. Big session where major goal was accomplished? give more. I can't be bothered to do anything more complicated than that, I have better things to do with my time as a GM.
How does this work again?

Every encounter (with a particular emphasis on numbered rooms in a dungeon, but not exclusive: a shopping trip or meetup at the inn could be an encounter, negotiating with the Duke could be an encounter, etc.) is worth 0-4 XP, at DM discretion. Doesn't matter what happens: combat, social engagement, trap, puzzle poking a wall with ten foot poles for fifteen minutes, etc. It's worth 0-4 XP: The average is assumed to be 2, and the book recommends basing the judgement on the difficulty of what was accomplished. The amount is determined by DM adjudication, of whatever standard seems to apply. They get through the trap in a businesslike manner, 1 XP. If the party does something off the wall and so amazing people are snorting Mountain Dew and high giving each other, maybe 4 XP. The XP doesn't come from particular activity, but from playing the game, and incentives engagement with what will make for cool moments rather than maximizing combat kills or loot.

The big question for 5E adaption would be the math: max level in DCC is 10, which is 1090 XP.
 
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Zaukrie

New Publisher
I will be buying this......it just looks great. Not the alternate cover, as usual, I don't like those (Tasha's being an exception).
 


NotAYakk

Legend
IGN has posted a preview of Rime of the Frostmaiden, including some preview pages (I've put one below). They will also be posting more previews tomorrow!

View attachment 125498

Ok, this looks like a really solid pseudo-west marches sandbox.

Lots of adventure hooks, both geographical and not. Lots of places. Non-linear travel grid.

I presume after the early parts there will be funnels (multiple ways to get hints into the "main path(s)")?
 

stadi

Explorer
I'm not a fan of how this starts. I like more "solid" hooks. These seem to be optional for the players. Why are they even there? That could already part of the hook. These starting adventures are like the heroes are sitting in a pub and someone is complaining that some iron is missing. Ok? Let's have another beer and that was it. These reek of being side-quests.
 


Reynard

Legend
I'm not a fan of how this starts. I like more "solid" hooks. These seem to be optional for the players. Why are they even there? That could already part of the hook. These starting adventures are like the heroes are sitting in a pub and someone is complaining that some iron is missing. Ok? Let's have another beer and that was it. These reek of being side-quests.
Well, it's better than "You are bullied into becoming cops."
 

Reynard

Legend
Every encounter (with a particular emphasis on numbered rooms in a dungeon, but not exclusive: a shopping trip or meetup at the inn could be an encounter, negotiating with the Duke could be an encounter, etc.) is worth 0-4 XP, at DM discretion. Doesn't matter what happens: combat, social engagement, trap, puzzle poking a wall with ten foot poles for fifteen minutes, etc. It's worth 0-4 XP: The average is assumed to be 2, and the book recommends basing the judgement on the difficulty of what was accomplished. The amount is determined by DM adjudication, of whatever standard seems to apply. They get through the trap in a businesslike manner, 1 XP. If the party does something off the wall and so amazing people are snorting Mountain Dew and high giving each other, maybe 4 XP. The XP doesn't come from particular activity, but from playing the game, and incentives engagement with what will make for cool moments rather than maximizing combat kills or loot.

The big question for 5E adaption would be the math: max level in DCC is 10, which is 1090 XP.
Huh. I don't like giving more XP for the same challenge just because someone made an extra hilarious Princess Bride reference, but YMMV.
 

I'm not a fan of how this starts. I like more "solid" hooks. These seem to be optional for the players. Why are they even there? That could already part of the hook. These starting adventures are like the heroes are sitting in a pub and someone is complaining that some iron is missing. Ok? Let's have another beer and that was it. These reek of being side-quests.
That's the nature of a sand box structure. But it's easy enough for the DM to create motives for PC involvement. Tying it into player backgrounds works well. Maybe the bard's grandmother was killed by an evil moose?
 


Parmandur

Legend
Huh. I don't like giving more XP for the same challenge just because someone made an extra hilarious Princess Bride reference, but YMMV.

We'll, no, not like that. Thinking on it, an example would be if a DCC party made their way to the end of the Tomb of Horrors: if they use a Spell to escape with what they have at that point, they could get 1 XP. If they repurpose one of the traps from earlier in the dungeon as a weapon and kill Ackerack (which reportedly happened in the original tournament), they would get 4 XP (and mad loot).
 

Parmandur

Legend
That's the nature of a sand box structure. But it's easy enough for the DM to create motives for PC involvement. Tying it into player backgrounds works well. Maybe the bard's grandmother was killed by an evil moose?

It seems there is a section on character creation that focuses on providing rationales for player involvement.
 

Reynard

Legend
We'll, no, not like that. Thinking on it, an example would be if a DCC party made their way to the end of the Tomb of Horrors: if they use a Spell to escape with what they have at that point, they could get 1 XP. If they repurpose one of the traps from earlier in the dungeon as a weapon and kill Ackerack (which reportedly happened in the original tournament), they would get 4 XP (and mad loot).
Ah. Gotcha. I thought you meant in game rewards for table behaviors, of which I am not a huge fan.
 



Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
XP is a great way to incentive certain behavior. When 1XP=1GP, the game was all about amassing treasure. When things changed and CR -> XP, then it was all about killing monsters. I liked 4e, in that there was a system for non-combat encounters to assign XP. The system itself wasn't great, but it was pretty good.

I use XP at the encounter scale, as opposed to the entire adventure scale (which is what I feel like milestone advancement is).

Milestone advancement doesn't work in Sandbox, imo. The milestones aren't well defined, so your players wander around. I guess maybe if it's discussed in Session 0 and expectations are set that there's not really an overarching story to discover, then that's ok. But if that's the case, then what's the point of the entire book. Just create stuff based on your players; and give them agency to create stuff in the setting as well.

Like the sandboxy Chapter 3 in Storm King's is the weakest part of that module. As a GM, give me a set of throughline stories through the whole adventure. If I want to do sandbox, I can, and ignore the stuff between L4 and L7; but the reason I buy pre-published adventures is so I don't have to create on the fly.
 

I like shorter adventures with a loose connection. I have tried a few of the big books and because we don't play as much as we wished, tgey are just too overwhelmingly long.
 

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