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So what are you reading this year 2021?

Ryujin

Hero
I finished reading "The Sisterhood of the Blade". It is an anthology of stories set in 3-musketeeof the era, but all the main characters are women, who serve as the Queen's guards. It is written by a number of different authors (Ed Greenwood being the most famous).

The first of the character is a samurai who had married a Frenchman, and moved to France. He was a spy for the king, but got murdered on a mission. The second is the daughter of a general. She is very good at swordfighting, and likes to drink, fight, and have lots of sexual relations. The third is a dark skinned female pirate, fluent in a number of languages. She too likes to drink, and fight and have sex (with both men and women). All sex is off-screen, and only referred to in off-hand comments.

It is an interesting idea, but the stories are a bit uneven, and would have benefitted from more editing given that some of them have contradictionary descriptions of the characters, and the language/style varies a lot. The three women have frequent fights with the Cardinal's guards. If you like swashbuckling, it is an interesting read.


Currently reading:
A book that is for instructors in archery. Since it is for the international market it's focus is on recurve (olympic) archery.

The expansion book for Good Society - A Jane Austen rpg. I do intend to run a one-shot for it with my gaming group)

Also doing proofreading on stuff for a number of Swedish RPG's.
  • A campaign for Kopparhavets Hjältar
  • Adventures for Chock åter från graven (Inspired by Chill 1e which was called "Chock" in Swedish. The title translates as "Chock back from the Grave", which is fitting since it has been out of print since the late 80's. Uses a different rule-system)
  • Going though the main rulebook for Chock åter från Graven, as they are thinking about doing a 2nd printing, and they felt that the proofreading on the first edition was lacking in quality.
  • Adventures for Kutulu. A Swedish Cthulhuesque game with allegedly simpler rules. Have one adventure left out of 4 written by Gabrielle de Bourg, who is one of the more frequent scenario-writers in Sweden, and have written for games like Vaesen, Tales from the Loop, Call of Cthulhu Sverige, and also a scenario for The Troubleshooters which was one of the stretchgoals for that kickstarter campaign.
The second sounds to have been inspired, at least a little, by Julie d’Aubigny, aka La Maupin. She was, by parts, an opera singer, a countess, a duellist.... There is a story of her taking a fancy to a woman she saw at a party and kissing her, passionately, in front of the woman's three male suitors. Those men, all three, challenged her to a duel in somewhat the fashion of The Three Musketeers and d'Artagnan. She defeated all three.

 

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Ulfgeir

Adventurer
The second sounds to have been inspired, at least a little, by Julie d’Aubigny, aka La Maupin. She was, by parts, an opera singer, a countess, a duellist.... There is a story of her taking a fancy to a woman she saw at a party and kissing her, passionately, in front of the woman's three male suitors. Those men, all three, challenged her to a duel in somewhat the fashion of The Three Musketeers and d'Artagnan. She defeated all three.

I think they are more intended to be the equivalents of the 3 musketeers. The Samurai = Aramis, The Generals daughter = Athos, and the former pirate = Porthos.
 

Finished Burroughs' At Earth's Core. It really didn't do much for me. Exceedingly racist, even for the time, with a dash of misogyny for good measure.

Also finished Rothfuss' The Lightning Tree. It was good, though not great like The Slow Regard of Silent Things. It was nice to revisit that world, but the short glimpse brought the long and fruitless wait for Doors of Stone into acute focus.

Next up is You Died: The Dark Souls Companion by Keza MacDonald and Jason Killingsworth. It's a collection of essays on Dark Souls, one of my favorite videogame series.
 


Zaukrie

New Publisher
Just finished Here of Ages. I DID NOT see that coming. The ending seemed almost too quick, but I get it......I may need to go back and re-read the last half.....did he shorten chapters? Did he change the style? It seemed like we were hurled forward, through the writing.

I really enjoyed Mistborn....quite a great trilogy.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Just finished Here of Ages. I DID NOT see that coming. The ending seemed almost too quick, but I get it......I may need to go back and re-read the last half.....did he shorten chapters? Did he change the style? It seemed like we were hurled forward, through the writing.

I really enjoyed Mistborn....quite a great trilogy.
I know, right! Total blindside! I swear I yelled at the book. NO! :D

The last half... That's what fans tend to call the Sanderlanche. His books often are slow and steady world and plot building, and then in the last hundred or so pages, the pace just picks up as the plot all comes together, pulling you along, you can't put it down, and it's 3 AM, and you have that presentation in the morning, but you'll be fine, you're so close to the end! BAM!

The Sanderlanche :)
 

ModestModernist

Adventurer
I just picked up the new Jeff Vandermeer book, 'Hummingbird Salamander' which came out last week,
only 30 pgs in but I'm already hooked. A bit more grounded than his last novel 'Dead Astronauts'.
 

Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
Just finished the first book of Deathworld by Harry Harrison. It's a great 60s sci-fi concept that could be turned into a campaign using a sci-fi rpg. The first book is a short, action pack read. It's a series of 3 books and a short story. Started book two last night. Each book takes place on a different planet.
 

I've really been grooving on Harry Harrison's short stories of late. They're sharp and punchy, Deathworld being no exception.

Just finished the first book of Deathworld by Harry Harrison. It's a great 60s sci-fi concept that could be turned into a campaign using a sci-fi rpg. The first book is a short, action pack read. It's a series of 3 books and a short story. Started book two last night. Each book takes place on a different planet.
 



It's intense and throws a lot at the reader, but very good.

After years of dancing around it, I'm finally taking the dive into Dostoievski with The Brothers Karamazov. I'm very excited.

I've been growing increasingly fond of shorter works under 200 pages. I used to be all about the 500+ page fantasy novels, but there's something to be said for the economy of storytelling, for getting your point across without padding, while still giving the reader vivid worldbuilding and characters.
I miss old school writing that was about a 'cool sci-fi idea' that didn't take 450 pages to read.
 

Khelon Testudo

Cleric of Stronmaus
I've started reading a compilation of the first 3 Garrett PI books by Glen Cook. Entertaining mostly, but yeesh, the sexism/misogyny! These were written in the late 80's, it looks like he decided Heinlein wasn't sexist enough.
So far though it's mostly background. He's not here to write about how bad women are. Just mentioning it when women do show up now and then.
 

Finished reading You Died, and sure enough, I went back to my replay of Dark Souls 1 on the Switch before I was done. The book did a great job of capturing what makes the game so special.

I then read Philip K. Dick's Second Variety. Written 30 years prior, it feels like such a strong precursor to Terminator.

Now, I'm onto re-reading Lloyd Alexander's The Book of Three, for the ENworld Summer Book Club.
 

Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
I've started reading a compilation of the first 3 Garrett PI books by Glen Cook. Entertaining mostly, but yeesh, the sexism/misogyny! These were written in the late 80's, it looks like he decided Heinlein wasn't sexist enough.
So far though it's mostly background. He's not here to write about how bad women are. Just mentioning it when women do show up now and then.
Cook himself is not mysogynstic judging from his body of work. Some of the characters are. Was it a good idea to do that? For me it's no. I couldn't finish the first book.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
After years of dancing around it, I'm finally taking the dive into Dostoievski with The Brothers Karamazov. I'm very excited.
My favorite book! It's amazing! It did help me to read it twice. The first time you get down all the characters and everyone's three names, and the plot. The second time you can focus on the deeper themes of the novel (death of God, redemptive suffering, etc).

I need to put Crime and Punishment on my stack.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading Bobby Fischer Goes to War: How a Lone American Star Defeated the Soviet Chess Machine by David Edmonds and John Eidinow.

Still reading Turn Coat by Jim Butcher.

Still reading Emma by Jane Austen.

Still reading Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Strange Death of Europe by Douglas Murray.

Still reading Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Tasha's Cauldron of Everything by Wizards of the Coast.

Still reading The Burning Bridge by John Flanagan.

Still reading The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis.

Started reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.
 

Richards

Legend
I finished Generations and I wouldn't have expected a Firefly novel taking place in one of the Arks that took humanity from Earth-That-Was to their present system to be so boring, but it was. Definitely a letdown. Now I'm starting up the first of three (seemingly unrelated) novels by Lisa Gardner: The Third Victim, about a police detective investigating her first homicide in a small town and finding out the guy confessing to the crime likely wasn't the one who did it; the back-cover blurb hints that the real murderer is somehow tied in to the detective's past. I'm hoping it'll be good, and I'm taking comfort in the fact that the other two of the author's novels I picked up (having been written over a decade later) are in that "overly tall" paperback format that are usually reserved for best sellers.

Johnathan
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Put The Promised Land and Four Hundred Souls on pause since they had to go back to the library. I have re-reserved, but each has long waiting lists.

Meanwhile, I inhaled Piranesi in one setting and LOVED it. Then I read v5 of the Lady Sherlock series (Murder on Cold Street), which I forgot I had already said to myself that I wasn't very interested in continuing. Now reading the most recent Arkady Martine book, A Desolation called Peace.

Waiting in the wings is the first Mary Robinette Kowal Lady Astronaut books, The Calculating Stars. I'll read that and the next two, hopefully by end of summer, including The Relentless Moon 2020 Hugo nominee. That will mean that for first time ever I will have read all of the Hugo nominees prior to the award being given.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Just finished the first book of Deathworld by Harry Harrison. It's a great 60s sci-fi concept that could be turned into a campaign using a sci-fi rpg. The first book is a short, action pack read. It's a series of 3 books and a short story. Started book two last night. Each book takes place on a different planet.
Gosh, I haven't read those in a while, after multiple reread when I was younger. Got into them aftter reading some of his Stainless Steel Rat series.
 

Awfully Cheerful Engine!

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