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So what are you reading this year 2021?

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
I've started reading a compilation of the first 3 Garrett PI books by Glen Cook. Entertaining mostly, but yeesh, the sexism/misogyny! These were written in the late 80's, it looks like he decided Heinlein wasn't sexist enough.
So far though it's mostly background. He's not here to write about how bad women are. Just mentioning it when women do show up now and then.
A good part of that is the Noir Hard-boiled Detective style that he's emulating. It does get better later on.
 

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Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
I'm hoping it'll be good, and I'm taking comfort in the fact that the other two of the author's novels I picked up (having been written over a decade later) are in that "overly tall" paperback format that are usually reserved for best sellers.
Do you mean trade paperback format vs. mass market paperback? It's not a format they bother with for everything, and basically assumes there's a hardcover which not all books get. The trade paperback is the same layout as the hardcover, and usually has better quality and acid-free paper compared the the smaller mass market paperback.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Just finished Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo, based ona recommendation from the Summer Reading thread. I enjoyed it, a solid 7.5-8 for me. It had been compared to The Lies of Locke Lamora, but didn't quite live up to that for me. One reason could be that except for a early scene that introduced three of the main characters, there was a lot more tell than show until halfway through the book. Of course, Lies is a very high bar - it's a standout that even the later books in the Gentleman Bastard's series haven't been able to match.

Would recommend, and planning to pick up more by Leigh Bardugo.

Which brings me to a tangential question. Shadow and Bone by the author has been made into a Netflix series that's gotten good reviews from friends. Has anyone that has consumed both suggest if I should read then watch, or watch then read?
 

Richards

Legend
Do you mean trade paperback format vs. mass market paperback? It's not a format they bother with for everything, and basically assumes there's a hardcover which not all books get. The trade paperback is the same layout as the hardcover, and usually has better quality and acid-free paper compared the the smaller mass market paperback.
I'm unsure of the proper terminology, but the standard paperback book is about 4" wide and almost 7" tall. Lately, some of the better-selling books have been coming out in a taller format, still only about 4" wide but now 7 1/2" tall. I suppose it's to make them stand out more or something, but it irritates me, especially when I have a series that started out in standard paperback format (like the "Agent Pendergast" series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child) that now comes out first in hardback and then in the "tall" paperback format. So much for standardization on my bookshelf!

There's also an even larger format, about 5 1/4" wide and 8" tall, that's comparable to a hardback book but comes in paperback format. Is that the trade paperback size you referred to?

Johnathan
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
I'm unsure of the proper terminology, but the standard paperback book is about 4" wide and almost 7" tall. Lately, some of the better-selling books have been coming out in a taller format, still only about 4" wide but now 7 1/2" tall. I suppose it's to make them stand out more or something, but it irritates me, especially when I have a series that started out in standard paperback format (like the "Agent Pendergast" series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child) that now comes out first in hardback and then in the "tall" paperback format. So much for standardization on my bookshelf!

There's also an even larger format, about 5 1/4" wide and 8" tall, that's comparable to a hardback book but comes in paperback format. Is that the trade paperback size you referred to?
Trade paperbacks are the layout for the hardcover, so the page size is the same though as a whole it's smaller because the cover is flush, nto projecting. But it it's only half an inch taller, it might just be a mass market in a different format. Then look to the quality and thickness of the paper to tell if it's a large mass market or a small trade.

Here's a handy infographic I found about the differences between trade paperbacks and mass market paperbacks.

Mass-Market-VS-Trade-Paperback-Books-Infographic-624x1024.jpg

Source: Mass-Market Paperback Books Vs. Trade Paperback Books: A Guide For Self-Publishers |
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Just read The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher.

Honestly, as much as I love the Dresden Files, Ithink this book is just a stronger work. Either way though, Butcher is a master of making the reader care about what happens to the characters.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
It is getting slowly better. I'm in the second book.
It's disturbing viewed through today's lens, but it's not something present in any other body of work and the intensity that he mimicked the style fades as he continues. Though I think the vocabulary stays mostly true to that source even as the rest of the writing (and the protagonist) changes so if that's too much of a barrier you know it now.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Just read The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher.

Honestly, as much as I love the Dresden Files, Ithink this book is just a stronger work. Either way though, Butcher is a master of making the reader care about what happens to the characters.
I enjoyed Aeronaut's Windlass, but for me I put it above his earliest Dresden and some of the Codex Alera, but behind late Dresden and well behind middle Dresden. But I've agreed with a lot of your book assessments before and it's sitting ten feet from me after my wife read it, so maybe I'll give it a re-read.
 

Finished Alexander's The Book of Three. Still magical, still wonderful.

Now I'm re-reading Robert Asprin's MYTH-ing Persons. Haven't read that one since I was a kid.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I enjoyed Aeronaut's Windlass, but for me I put it above his earliest Dresden and some of the Codex Alera, but behind late Dresden and well behind middle Dresden. But I've agreed with a lot of your book assessments before and it's sitting ten feet from me after my wife read it, so maybe I'll give it a re-read.
Yeah that’s probably fair. I think that there are maybe some lessons he has learned that are easier to apply to a new series than an to the series from which you learned the lessons, if that makes sense?

And he is much better now, IMO, at writing women. But weirdly like, it’s more noticeable to me in Windlass than in Peace Talks and Battle Ground.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Just finished Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo, based ona recommendation from the Summer Reading thread. I enjoyed it, a solid 7.5-8 for me. It had been compared to The Lies of Locke Lamora, but didn't quite live up to that for me. One reason could be that except for a early scene that introduced three of the main characters, there was a lot more tell than show until halfway through the book. Of course, Lies is a very high bar - it's a standout that even the later books in the Gentleman Bastard's series haven't been able to match.

Would recommend, and planning to pick up more by Leigh Bardugo.

Which brings me to a tangential question. Shadow and Bone by the author has been made into a Netflix series that's gotten good reviews from friends. Has anyone that has consumed both suggest if I should read then watch, or watch then read?
There's a whole thread here that's not super spoilery.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I'm unsure of the proper terminology, but the standard paperback book is about 4" wide and almost 7" tall. Lately, some of the better-selling books have been coming out in a taller format, still only about 4" wide but now 7 1/2" tall. I suppose it's to make them stand out more or something, but it irritates me, especially when I have a series that started out in standard paperback format (like the "Agent Pendergast" series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child) that now comes out first in hardback and then in the "tall" paperback format. So much for standardization on my bookshelf!

There's also an even larger format, about 5 1/4" wide and 8" tall, that's comparable to a hardback book but comes in paperback format. Is that the trade paperback size you referred to?

Johnathan
Yes, the 4" x 71/2" format lots of Stephen King books are in this format now. Still a mass market pb; but just... larger. Annoying for the bookstores that were maximizing their shelf space with shelves that were exactly tall enough to fit the classic mmpb size book, like my local used bookstore.
 



Khelon Testudo

Cleric of Stronmaus
It's disturbing viewed through today's lens, but it's not something present in any other body of work and the intensity that he mimicked the style fades as he continues. Though I think the vocabulary stays mostly true to that source even as the rest of the writing (and the protagonist) changes so if that's too much of a barrier you know it now.
Thanks. Yeah, it's annoying, but the vocab is part of the genre he's using, or rather mashing with the fantasy genre. The actual treatment of characters is sort of improved in the second book, but I don't think the term "fridging" had been coined at that point. Because of that improvement, and because I'm by turns amused and intrigued by his versions of fantasy 'races', I'm keeping on reading.
 

MYTH-ing persons was fun and quick. One thing new that I caught was that the Woof Writers were clear references to Wendy and Richard Pini. Not having read Elfquest until my twenties, that went over my head as a kid.

I then read Manly Wade Wellman's The Golgotha Dancers short story. Effective and quick, it felt like it could've done with a little more expansion.

Now I'm reading Abraham Merritt's Creep, Shadow!
 

Richards

Legend
I finished Lisa Gardner's The Third Victim and all of my hopes for the book were met: good characters, intriguing plot, logical resolution. It helps that I was on an all-day courier trip on a military plane on Tuesday, but I finished the 373-page book in almost one sitting - I had only the last 50 pages or so to finish up Wednesday and Thursday nights at bedtime. So now I'm starting the next of hers that I own: Touch & Go, about a missing family - possibly abducted - and the attempts to find out what happened to them, with uncovered pieces gradually painting a much different picture of the apparently perfect family than the neighbors ever saw. I enjoyed the previous book enough that I'm not worried that it'll be good; I'm a dozen pages into it and I'm already liking it.

Johnathan
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading Bobby Fischer Goes to War: How a Lone American Star Defeated the Soviet Chess Machine by David Edmonds and John Eidinow.

Still reading Turn Coat by Jim Butcher.

Still reading Emma by Jane Austen.

Still reading Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Strange Death of Europe by Douglas Murray.

Still reading Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Tasha's Cauldron of Everything by Wizards of the Coast.

Still reading The Burning Bridge by John Flanagan.

Still reading The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Started reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
 

Khelon Testudo

Cleric of Stronmaus
Still reading Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading Bobby Fischer Goes to War: How a Lone American Star Defeated the Soviet Chess Machine by David Edmonds and John Eidinow.

Still reading Turn Coat by Jim Butcher.

Still reading Emma by Jane Austen.

Still reading Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Strange Death of Europe by Douglas Murray.

Still reading Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Tasha's Cauldron of Everything by Wizards of the Coast.

Still reading The Burning Bridge by John Flanagan.

Still reading The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Started reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
Do you read at least some pages of each of these every day, week, or month? Or are all these books just bookmarked, and you just read a few to completion at a time?

To contribute: I've put aside Garrett: PI after the second book for now. I'm reading Glen Cook's Port of Shadows, a fixer-upper of some of his later short stories about the Black Company. I'm liking the writing better, but women don't fare much better than in the detective series. With the exception of Her Ladyship, they're pretty much victims and/or whores.
 

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