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So what are you reading this year 2021?

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Hey congrats on completing a book lol (gentle ribbing, no harm meant)

Been interested in this series. If you are willing, would love to hear non-spoilery feedback on discount Armageddon and this one...
LOL It's actually been a decent week finishing books :) If I ignore watching all the streaming stuff I'm also trying to do...

The InCryptid series has so far been really enjoyable to read. It's light-hearted and doesn't take itself too seriously. I also started McGrath's other series October Daye. I was pointed to both when looking at Dresden stuff, and it really is a lot like Dresden, but sort of split up. All the hard core, gritty Dresden seems to be in October Daye, and all of the snarky, laugh out loud Dresden stuff is in the InCryptid series.

So the first two books (I'm only a little way into Midnight Blue-Light Special) feature Verity Price as the first person narrator. Verity is in her twenties living in a "semi-legal" apartment in New York. She comes from a family of cryptozoologists (people who study creatures of myth and legend, some of which are as sentient as humanity). Part of that is also culling the monsters if they start to be a threat to humans, though mostly they're scientists. Verity is trying to decide if she wants to continue full in with the family plan, or devote herself to her other passion, professional ballroom dancing. Meanwhile, she runs into a young Italian hottie who is a member of the Covenant of St. George, an order devoted to killing such creatures as evil abominations. Also devoted to killing Verity's family because they used to be Covenant three generations ago. And then they find out there might be a dragon, thought extinct for centuries, asleep under Manhattan.

One of my favorite parts of the series is each chapter has little epitaphs of quotes from Verity's grandmother usually, which kind of give an indication of just what kind of family she grew up in.

A couple from Midnight Blue-Light Special:

"The best thing I ever did was figure out how to hide a pistol in my brassiere. The second best was let Thomas figure out how to find it, but that's a story for another day." - Alice Healy (main character's grandmother)

"Well, that's not something you see everyday. Go tell your father that Grandma need the grenades." - Enid Healy

"Treat your weapons like you treat your children. That means cleaning them caring for them, counting on them to do the best they can for you, and forgiving them when they can't." - Enid Healy

"Any man who doesn't believe in carrying weapons on a first date is not a man worth knowing." - Frances Brown

Other books in the series go into other members of Verity's family, like her younger sister Antimony, or her brother and her "cousin" Susan (not really a cousin -- she's a cuckoo cryptid, a species that usually preys on humans, but she isn't evil, that was adopted. Susan loves ketchup. She puts it on everything. Mmmm...ketchup milkshake...)

Hope that wasn't too spoilery. Didn't really give anything plot wise you wouldn't get from reading the back of the book. Check it out. It was fun.
 

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KahlessNestor

Adventurer
I recently got into Brandon Sanderson's books. I love them.

Last month I read the Rithmatist, Way of Kings, Words of Radiance, and Oathbringer.

I just finished Mistborn.
Currently reading Rhythm of War (The Fourth book in the Stormlight Archive).

If you think you've read a long book before, look up the Stormlight Archive. Brandon Sanderson is planning on there being 10 in the series (he's working on the 5th book now), and all of them are well over 1,000 pages. I've read some long books and series before, but this is something else.

Awesome! I am wanting the Rithmatist sequel, but doubt that will end up happening, unfortunately.

And Stormlight is actually going to be two series of 5 books. There will be a big time jump after book 5.

Currently Skyward and finishing Mistborn Era 2 is up next. Skyward 3 is in November. Wax and Wayne finale is currently in revisions.
 

AcererakTriple6

Autistic DM (he/him)
Awesome! I am wanting the Rithmatist sequel, but doubt that will end up happening, unfortunately.

And Stormlight is actually going to be two series of 5 books. There will be a big time jump after book 5.

Currently Skyward and finishing Mistborn Era 2 is up next. Skyward 3 is in November. Wax and Wayne finale is currently in revisions.
Good to know. However, IMO, if the Stormlight Archive is going to be "two series of 5", I'm fine with just calling it one series of 10. Like how the Percy Jackson series has 10 full books in it (well, 15 if you count the Trials of Apollo). Thanks for letting me know about the time-skip, though!

I actually read at least the first Mistborn book when I was in Middle School, but I couldn't get into it back then. I'd also read the Rithmatist a few years later, but didn't realize that it was the same author until about a month ago. I don't have the rest of the Mistborn series right now, but I'll probably get them for my birthday later this month.

Yeah, I wish that the sequel to the Rithmatist was already out, and it's extremely disappointing that he doesn't seem to have it coming up anytime soon, but it's good for what it is right now. It was the book that got me into internally-consistent magical systems in the first place, and I'm glad to have reread it after these past few years.

Thanks for the info!
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Sanderson has said he realizes he needs to do a lot more research into Mesoamerica before he can write the Rithmatist sequel. Unfortunately, he doesn't know when he'll have time for that research. So the sequel is kind of...in limbo.

The Alcatraz final book is at least on his schedule. You could check out the Alcatraz series.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Currently reading:

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin. Wildly inventive, as I've come to expect from her.

Invincibles: The Entropy of Everything (Book 3) by Matthew Phillion. Delving more into the heroes-that-left - the previous generation that had abandoned Earth.

The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett. I have two words: Terry. Pratchett. How could you go wrong?
 

Finished Hawke's The Wizard of 4th Street. It was a fast-paced read, but I feel like that made it stumble a bit on the ending as it could used more time to make better sense of what was actually happening.

Also finished reading Carl Sagan's Cosmos. That was an amazing read - even 40 years later, it still feels exceptional, expanding my understanding of the universe and my wonder at it.

Now I'm finally getting around to Stephen King's Firestarter.

Also, at some point I need to try the first Stormlight Archive book again. Despite liking all of Sanderson's other works, that one was a DNF for me.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
Finished Sheepfarmer's Daughter and started Divided Allegiance. I had forgotten how they are really just one long book. It is REALLY noticeable when reading the omnibus version and you just turn the page from one book to the next.
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
@Eyes of Nine sent me Machinehood by SB Divya (thanks!), it was good, well written, sort of the cyberpunky dystopia where everyone takes designer drugs like zip or flow to move and think faster to compete with machines. Ending was a bit anticlimactic.

Also re-read the Revelation Space trilogy, it was good, sort of same deal with the end though. Re-read Roadside Picnic, always awesome. Re-read Bujold's Shards of Honor, 1st of the Vorkosigan saga, easily it is sort of the weakest of the series, as she really hits her stride in the middle part. Now I think I am going to re-read Pandora's Star by Peter F Hamilton, same as with Revelation Space and Shards of Honor, I bet there are parts which I have completely forgotten. I would like to re-read Consider Phlebas by Banks, except I gave that one away.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Currently reading:

The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett. I have two words: Terry. Pratchett. How could you go wrong?
Yeah, can't really go wrong with Pratchett. I think the Maurice story would be an amazing animated film. Or even live action with CGI cat and mice.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Also, at some point I need to try the first Stormlight Archive book again. Despite liking all of Sanderson's other works, that one was a DNF for me.
Way of Kings does have a pretty steep learning curve to it, because it's probably the most "world building" he has to do, which slows things a little (though I still found it fascinating). But it is a world where you can't just "assume" a lot like in other fantasy. Flora and fauna are VERY different. The races are very different. And you get impacts of ancient history and religion that aren't immediately explained and you just have to take it in and move on. But it's all well worth it. Especially when you run across easter eggs like the first Interlude chapter with the strangers in the tavern or meet Wit and Zahel.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Changes by Jim Butcher.

Still reading A Lone Habitation by Seanan McGuire.

Still listening to Lux by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Black Widow: Forever Red by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading The Battle for Skandia by John Flanagan.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Sill reading Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell.

Still reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Started reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Started reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Can anyone recommend an entertaining biography of Richard Feynman? I've read two of his collected takes, "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman" and "What Do You Care What Other People Think", but I tried to read James Gleick's "The Life and Science of Richard Feynman" but it was so try. Yes, I'm looking for more actual accounts then just amusing anecdotes (though those are fun), but for someone portrayed as such a character in those first too books, none of that came across in Gleick's work and it was a chore to read.
 

It's definitely Sanderson's most ambitious bit of worldbuilding. And that part was definitely enjoyable. I think part of it was that I've been burnt on 700+ page fantasy novels ever since I did the whole of the Wheel of Time over the course of a year.

Way of Kings does have a pretty steep learning curve to it, because it's probably the most "world building" he has to do, which slows things a little (though I still found it fascinating). But it is a world where you can't just "assume" a lot like in other fantasy. Flora and fauna are VERY different. The races are very different. And you get impacts of ancient history and religion that aren't immediately explained and you just have to take it in and move on. But it's all well worth it. Especially when you run across easter eggs like the first Interlude chapter with the strangers in the tavern or meet Wit and Zahel.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Currently working my way through Bill Owen's book, Judges Guild's Bob & Bill: A Cautionary Tale, third edition. The history of Judges Guild is one I'm far less familiar with compared to TSR, and the plethora of illustrations is quite something as well. The extremely short chapters make it easy to peruse it in small bits when there's not much free time.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Currently working my way through Bill Owen's book, Judges Guild's Bob & Bill: A Cautionary Tale, third edition. The history of Judges Guild is one I'm far less familiar with compared to TSR, and the plethora of illustrations is quite something as well. The extremely short chapters make it easy to peruse it in small bits when there's not much free time.
Bob turned out to be somewhat... problematic. Any discussion of that in the book? I used to love that Judge's Guild stuff existed, although I always found it a bit thin, at least their early stuff.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Bob turned out to be somewhat... problematic. Any discussion of that in the book? I used to love that Judge's Guild stuff existed, although I always found it a bit thin, at least their early stuff.
As I recall, that was Bill Jr., not Bill Sr. I haven't finished the book yet, but given that this edition was published in 2014 (which was before the controversy broke out), I don't think it's going to mention that.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
Finished the Deed of Paksanarrion. Starts much stronger than it finishes. It's my third reading, and I've decided book three is my least favorite. The last third just doesn't excite me for some reason.
 

Richards

Legend
I'm starting a new series by Ruth Downie (an author I've never read before), four novels of which I picked up in hardback at the library book sale for a dollar apiece. This first one is called Medicus and it's the first in the series (published in 2006) so I shouldn't have too much trouble with the others I bought, given there are some books missing between them. But as it's a mystery series, I assume each book will be more or less standalone as far as not needing to have read all of the previous ones.

In any case, the main character is a down-on-his luck doctor in ancient Roman times, off to his new duties in the faraway land of Brittania, where he'll apparently rescue a young slave and soon after get involved in a series of murders involving prostitutes. I enjoy ancient Roman historical fiction and I've taken to mysteries, so this should be a good mixture of the two.

Johnathan
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Changes by Jim Butcher.

Still reading A Lone Habitation by Seanan McGuire.

Still listening to Lux by Brandon Sanderson.

Finished reading Black Widow: Forever Red by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading The Battle for Skandia by John Flanagan.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Sill reading Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell.

Still reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Started reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.
 

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