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So what are you reading this year 2021?

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading Changes by Jim Butcher.

Still reading A Lone Habitation by Seanan McGuire.

Still listening to Lux by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading The Battle for Skandia by John Flanagan.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Sill reading Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell.

Still reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Started reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.
 

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I finished Barker's Books of Blood, volume 1. For being some of his earliest works, the stories still hold up. I think they're at their best when they have a wry and oh so dark sense of humor, like The Yattering and Jack (which apparently was adapted into a Tales from the Dark Side Episode in 1987, something I had no idea about until now).

Now I'm reading Clark Ashton Smith's Hyperborea.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
Read Atomic Habits in a few hours. Lots of obvious advice, but some real nuggets also. I wouldn't pay full price, but at a discount it's a decent book on habits.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Read Atomic Habits in a few hours. Lots of obvious advice, but some real nuggets also. I wouldn't pay full price, but at a discount it's a decent book on habits.
I've got a friend who swears by this. Maybe I'll get it sometime. I've been meaning to look at used bookstores - I'm with you wouldn't want to spend full pop on it...
 

I finished reading Clark Ashton Smith's Hyperborea. CAS has become one of my favorite pulp/Appendix N-ish authors. Hyperborea is weird and beautiful and horrific all at once.

Now I'm reading P. Djeli Clark's Ring Shout.
 


KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading Changes by Jim Butcher.

Still reading A Lone Habitation by Seanan McGuire.

Finished listening to Lux by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading The Battle for Skandia by John Flanagan.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Sill reading Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell.

Still reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Still reading The Black Echo by Michael Connelly.

Started reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
Plot and Structure

Or, the long title:

Write Great Fiction - Plot & Structure: Techniques and Exercises for Crafting and Plot That Grips Readers from Start to Finish​

Skimmed/read it one night. I didn't read the exercises or all the basic plots (I'm not writing a love story!)......there are some real nuggets in here for sure. I'll be going back over this one with a highlighter.

I also finished Stephen King's Memoir on Writing (or somesuch title). Some good stuff. I wasn't sure at first how much biography I wanted, but when I look back at my life, I can see how it shaped me to want to write about glass ceilings (which seems to be a them in all three books I've started, in very different genres).

I have Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life and Steering the Craft: A Twenty-First-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story next up in terms of "how to write" books. And I'm reading Aurora for fiction (which, frankly, as I read, I think.....I write this well. But my characters aren't this good).
 

I finished Clark's Ring Shout. Crackling good, cinematic action, with plenty of emotional heft. And seeing racists get their due is tops in my book.

Now I'm reading Brian Lumley's second Titus Crow novel, The Transition of Titus Crow.
 
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Mallus

Legend
I'm reading a mystery about a flock of philosophical sheep who solve a murder. Of a shepherd, obviously. Leonie Swann's Three Bags Full. Take a shot of Douglas Adams, a shot of Richard Adams, toss a few cubes of Agatha Christie, shake vigorously...
 
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KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading Changes by Jim Butcher.

Finished reading A Lone Habitation by Seanan McGuire. - A good series, but tends to be...dark. Even when she solves a case, Toby is usually pretty beat up, and lots of people die. Was a sad ending. Bittersweet. But I guess that’s what the Fae will do to you.

Still reading The Battle for Skandia by John Flanagan.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Sill reading Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell.

Still reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien. - Going to drop this for now. I’ve read it twice, I’m reading it on Kindle, and I have lots of new books on Kindle I need to read, two of which I need to get done before Brandon Sanderson’s book comes out next month.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Still reading The Black Echo by Michael Connelly.

Started reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.

Started listening to Skyward by Brandon Sanderson. - I want to reread the two Skyward novels before the next one comes out next month, so I decided to do it via audiobook.

Started reading Sunreach by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson. - Preparation for Cytonic out next month.
 

Richards

Legend
I'm now onto the third book in Ruth Downie's series of novels about a Roman military doctor (medicus) who keeps getting involved in solving murders. This one's called Persona Non Grata and has the protagonist returning to his family home in Gaul where he'll have to deal with the many people his family owes money to, and he'll naturally get involved in another murder along the way. It's a good series and I'm enjoying it, but after this one I only have the fourth book next in my lineup.

Johnathan
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
I finished reading Clark Ashton Smith's Hyperborea. CAS has become one of my favorite pulp/Appendix N-ish authors. Hyperborea is weird and beautiful and horrific all at once.

Now I'm reading P. Djeli Clark's Ring Shout.
I'll have to add that to my list. I'm finally getting around to reading Jack Vance's Dying earth. Everyone should read this. Not because of the tie ins with DnD and how heavily this book influenced the game (beyond the vancian magic), bit period books like this are a treasure trove of vocabulary that has died out and you don't see in modern books any more. That to me is the best treat.
 


Blue Orange

Adventurer
I'll have to add that to my list. I'm finally getting around to reading Jack Vance's Dying earth. Everyone should read this. Not because of the tie ins with DnD and how heavily this book influenced the game (beyond the vancian magic), bit period books like this are a treasure trove of vocabulary that has died out and you don't see in modern books any more. That to me is the best treat.

Vance wasn't just taking words from his period, though. The guy actively sought out obscure and obsolete words in his vocabulary to give the feeling of something that sounded like English but he could give a new meaning to. A deodand was a pre-20th century legal term for a thing that was given up because it had caused a person's death; Vance turned it into a monster.
 


dragoner

Dying in Chargen
I'll third a vote on Dying Earth, it is so good:

"I am more inclined to punish Hurtiancz for his crassness, said Ildefonse. But now he simulates a swinish stupidity to escape my anger. Absolute falsity! roared Hurtiancz. I simulate nothing! Ildefonse shrugged. For all his deficiencies as polemicist and magician, Hurtiancz at least is candid."
 


KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading Changes by Jim Butcher.

Started reading An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire. - Next October Daye novel.

Still reading The Battle for Skandia by John Flanagan.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Sill reading Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Finished reading The Black Echo by Michael Connelly. - First Harry Bosch book.

Still reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.

Still listening to Skyward by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Sunreach by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson.
 

By far, Gene Wolfe, Jack Vance, and CAS are the three authors I find myself most having to look up the meaning of words. But the one thing I find with them is that it's not so much using obscure terminology, but obscure terminology that evokes a certain feeling.

For those interested in archaic and unused words, according to Luke Gygax, Poplollies & Bellibones was a volume Gary Gygax frequently had on hand.

I'll have to add that to my list. I'm finally getting around to reading Jack Vance's Dying earth. Everyone should read this. Not because of the tie ins with DnD and how heavily this book influenced the game (beyond the vancian magic), bit period books like this are a treasure trove of vocabulary that has died out and you don't see in modern books any more. That to me is the best treat.

Gene Wolfe did that a lot too, especially in his "Torturer" series.

Johnathan
 

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