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So what are you reading this year 2021?

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Finished The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, from 1996. Like most of Stephenson's work, it's got a ton of interesting ideas in it. That tugged me along slowly for first 250 pages or so. But then finally the protagonist became clear, and her arc also became roughly clear, and I gobbled up the remaining 249 pages. I would recommend, although
there is sexual assault towards the end that is mostly hand-waved, which I think sadly is a pretty 90's cis-male approach
.

Next up more zines! Oh also the Green Lantern graphic novel written by NK Jemisin, Far Sector.
 

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Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Finished The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, from 1996. Like most of Stephenson's work, it's got a ton of interesting ideas in it. That tugged me along slowly for first 250 pages or so. But then finally the protagonist became clear, and her arc also became roughly clear, and I gobbled up the remaining 249 pages. I would recommend, although
there is sexual assault towards the end that is mostly hand-waved, which I think sadly is a pretty 90's cis-male approach
.

Next up more zines! Oh also the Green Lantern graphic novel written by NK Jemisin, Far Sector.
Diamond Age is a wonderful mess. I've re-read it a good number of times, as the experience changes when you know what's going on. It's perhaps top 3 and definitely 5 top of his works for me.

Oh, if you've read Snowcrash, there's a pseudo-confirmed by Author cameo by a quite old YT.

Onto the second part - NK Jemisin wrote Green Lantern? She's absolutely one of my favorite author's that's I've been exposed to in the last 5 years. I had no idea she did that though, thank you for mentioning it!
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Haven't been doing as much reading. I have more half-finished books then I like. Finished the 3rd Indestructables book, The Entropy of Everything. It ... was weaker than the first two. Had some quite good areas, but the stakes were raised to a point that the characters couldn't accept them if everything went pear shaped - and had a handy escape mechanism so wouldn't have to. Between those, it didn't hold the tension. There was some good character growth, but that's what you read teen superhero books for, so I hope so. ;)
 


Richards

Legend
I'm reading The Mask of Loki by Roger Zelazny and Thomas T. Thomas. I'm not sure how I missed this one, as I had thought I'd read just about all of Zelazny's novels. In keeping with his favorite topic - updating various mythological beings to the current or future day - this one deals not only with Loki in the near future, but also a Templar plotline involving recurring battles against assassins over the centuries.

Johnathan
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Diamond Age is a wonderful mess. I've re-read it a good number of times, as the experience changes when you know what's going on. It's perhaps top 3 and definitely 5 top of his works for me.

Oh, if you've read Snowcrash, there's a pseudo-confirmed by Author cameo by a quite old YT.
Yes I caught that and very much enjoyed the easter egg. It's been a very long time since I read Snowcrash (within a year or two of it's publication); but I will never forget the skateboard with the wheels that stuck to the road (being an active skateboarder at the time).
 

BookTenTiger

He / Him
We just had a baby, so I've been reading a lot in between / during feedings. Lately I finished:

Beautiful World Where Are You, by Sally Rooney

If you are a Rooney fan (and I am), this is a must read. She's much more experimental in this novel than her others, and I think it really pays off.

Hamnet, by Maggie O'Farrell

This is subtitled A Novel of the Plague, making it strangely appropriate to read now. It's about Shakespeare's wife and kids (including his son Hamnet, which was synonymous with Hamlet at the time). It's a beautiful, emotionally devastating book, full of neat historic details, and I'm not sure reading it at the birth of my son was a good idea!

Best Short Stories of 2021: O'Henry Prize Winners

I get this collection every year, and it never disappoints. This was the first year they used translated stories, as well as the usual stories published in English. A really wonderful collection, each story worthy of the prize.
 




Ryujin

Legend
Got my advanced copy of Todd Downing's "Raiders of the Red Storm", book 6 of the "Airship Daedalus" pulp series, and am digging into it.
 

I just finished re-reading Fletcher Pratt's The Blue Star. I liked it more than the first time I read it, but that's somewhat damning it with faint praise. It's still got an unpleasant cynicism to it. Though I suspect that was the point, it grated on me.

Now I'm onto another re-read The Return of the King. It's been almost six years since my last readthrough.
 



Mallus

Legend
I’m about 150 pages in Anthony Doerr’s new book Cloud Cuckoo Land. He’s got a wonderful storyteller’s voice. I’m too brain-frazzled to describe it better right now, but if you liked his earlier book All the Light We Cannot See definitely give this one a go.

As long as your up for a story that takes place, so far, in and around 15th Century Constantinople, present day Idaho, 1940s Idaho, and outer space aboard a generation starship.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading The Battle for Spain by Antony Beevor.

Still reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Still reading An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading Critical Role: Tal’dorei Campaign Setting by Matthew Mercer.

Still reading Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire.

Still reading The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones.

Still reading The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon.

Still reading Black Widow: Red Vengeance by Margaret Stohl.

Still reading Royal Assassin by Robin Hobb.

Still reading Sly Flourish’s The Lazy Dungeon Master by Michael E. Shea.

Still reading Matchlock and the Embassy: A Thirty Years’ War Story by Zachary Twamley.

Still listening to Skyward by Brandon Sanderson.

Finished reading Sunreach by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson.

Still reading The Black Ice by Michael Connelly.

Still reading Rise of the King by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading The Sorcerer of the North by John Flanagan.

Still reading Ghost Story by Jim Butcher.

Started reading ReDawn by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson.
 

Richards

Legend
I finished The Mask of Loki and it turns out I had read it before. It was eminently forgettable and I had apparently done just that, because I didn't remember a thing about it as I read through it...except for one bit involving King Guy and his Crusaders in the Holy Lands, drinking from a small pool of water that had been contaminated on purpose with the carcass of a dead sheep. Other than that one scene, none of it was familiar and it was easily my least favorite novel that Roger Zelazny ever had a hand in. I do not recommend it.

So next up, as a palate cleanser, I'm going with Hull Zero Three by Greg Bear, a science fiction novel about a man who wakes up early on a generation ship, traveling to an unknown destination - unknown to him at least, as he awakens with no memory of who he is or how he got there. So there will be mysteries unfolding as he learns about the environment he wakes up in...sounds interesting.

Johnathan
 


Jmarso

Adventurer
Going back and forth between the Seth material and a Song of Ice and Fire. With a LOTR re-read (+Silmarillion) thrown in about mid-year for good measure.
 

wicked cool

Adventurer
Just finished Lumley's The Transition of Titus Crow. While the first one was very much a love letter to pulp horror, this one is more a love letter to weird fantasy. But I found it less enjoyable; it was fine, but not great. The plot sort of ambles along until it finishes.

Also finished Time-Life Books' Night Creatures, from The Enchanted World line. Oof, is the book filled with some nightmare fuel. Turning the page feels like you're an interloper stumbling on some horrid sight:

View attachment 145750

Now I'm reading Tolkien's The Nature of Middle-Earth.
i love his vampire books!
 

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