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So what are you reading this year 2021?

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Finished reading all of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe (and related) books. There weren't many where I actually found myself paying attention to the clues because the characters were so front and center and engaging. I'm trying to reread and see if anything jumps out that I missed the first time through.
 

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Finished reading Headley's Beowulf translation. The language is modern and muscular, but still maintains the alliteration and cadence. It practically begs to be read aloud, loudly.

After reading the history of Sword & Sorcery volume, I found myself with an itch to re-read some R.E. Howard. So I am now reading Kull, Exile of Atlantis.
 


I finished off Dean Koontz's Breathless in less than 24 hours - it was 337 pages long, but the print was almost at Large Print size and I'd bet in a normal-sized print it would have been closer to about 200 pages. A good read, but not one of his better novels, as he had about four different characters having their own story and some of them didn't get pulled together into the main plotline until the very end. And the deal with the twin at the farmhouse made no real sense at all; it almost seemed like that plotline didn't really need to have been in this book at all.

Anyway, now I'm trying out Superhuman by Michael Carroll. It deals with the first supervillain, an immortal superhuman from 4,000 years ago who's being brought into the present day somehow, where he'll end up being fought off by a band of young heroes who have recently discovered their own powers. I'm not sure if this is a Young Adult novel or what, but at fifty cents from a library book sale I figured it was worth a shot.

Johnathan
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Private Investigator series by Glen Cook. It was a fun little book, if you can get by some sexism and racism (aimed at other fantasy races)......I also own the second one in the series, so I'll likely read that in the coming weeks.
There's a lot of the Garret P.I. books. They absolutely build on each other though each book is self contained. They're of varying quality between fun and pretty good. I've collected them over the years, mostly from second hand stores.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
There's a lot of the Garret P.I. books. They absolutely build on each other though each book is self contained. They're of varying quality between fun and pretty good. I've collected them over the years, mostly from second hand stores.

I love the first six volumes (and think it has a lot of inspiration for D&D like games). I think seven through nine are worth reading, but they make me a little sad because the plot ideas and most of the writing is strong, but there are spots in each where the (non-graphic) writing about interpersonal relationships with the opposite sex felt juvenile and repetitive. Re-editing a few pages could have made them as good as the first six to me. I wish 10 never happened, and it don't think it really regains its footing after that (although a character introduced in nine really starts shining, and another character who was definitely not shining gets shown the door).
 

Mallus

Legend
I'm still reading Agatha Christie, following our early pandemic binge-watch of every episode of the David Suchet Poirot series. Death on the Nile is a terrific good book (as opposed to her The Big Four which is a terrific bad book). So in my early 50s I am finally discovering the appeal of the mystery genre.

Perhaps I should have read fewer books with dragons, spaceships and mutants on the cover?
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
I'm still reading Agatha Christie, following our early pandemic binge-watch of every episode of the David Suchet Poirot series. Death on the Nile is a terrific good book (as opposed to her The Big Four which is a terrific bad book). So in my early 50s I am finally discovering the appeal of the mystery genre.

Perhaps I should have read fewer books with dragons, spaceships and mutants on the cover?
No. But check out Raymond Chandler.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I'm still reading Agatha Christie, following our early pandemic binge-watch of every episode of the David Suchet Poirot series. Death on the Nile is a terrific good book (as opposed to her The Big Four which is a terrific bad book). So in my early 50s I am finally discovering the appeal of the mystery genre.

Perhaps I should have read fewer books with dragons, spaceships and mutants on the cover?

Or potentially, you read the exact right number of books with dragons, spaceships and mutants on the cover so that at exactly at this moment in time your brain was perfectly poised to love the murder mystery genre.
 

I finished R.E. Howard's Kull, Exile of Atlantis. Way better than I remembered. I used to think of Kull as a dry run for Conan, a less interesting prototype. But Kull is, more than any other character, a reflection of R.E. Howard's depression. He broods, he suffers from melancholy, he philosophizes, ponders existence.

Now I've finally moving to the conclusion of N.K. Jemisin's Broken Earth trilogy, with The Stone Sky. Been slowly savoring this series, but it's time to see how it ends.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Have been getting surprisingly little reading done. Lost my current book to just find it last night. Mostly I've been re(-ish)reading the Cortex Prime book.

I kickstarted it, so I've read early editions of it but not the current one. So it's a combonation of reading and re-reading that I just coined re-ish-reading. Where do I go to collect my royalties when people use this much-needed word?
 

I just started a trio of novels in a collection called Guards of Haven: The Adventures of Hawk and Fisher by Simon R. Green. It's the novels Wolf in the Fold, Guard Against Dishonor, and The Bones of Haven and the two main characters are a married couple of Guard Captains in a fantasy city (the eponymous Haven). I'm just a few chapters into the first novel but I'm already liking it: it's a D&D-style fantasy with the added twist of being a kind of police procedural.

Oh, and Super Human (the book I just finished up) was apparently young adult after all (despite not being labeled as such) and not much to my liking: I think I'll ignore any more in that series.

Johnathan
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Have been getting surprisingly little reading done. Lost my current book to just find it last night. Mostly I've been re(-ish)reading the Cortex Prime book.

I kickstarted it, so I've read early editions of it but not the current one. So it's a combonation of reading and re-reading that I just coined re-ish-reading. Where do I go to collect my royalties when people use this much-needed word?
I do like Cortex Prime. Just haven't had a chance to play it a lot. Played a couple games of Marvel Heroic, but nothing since then.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Exploring Eberron by Keith Baker.

Still reading Small Favor by Jim Butcher.

Finished reading The Companions by R. A. Salvatore.

Still reading Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson.

Still reading The Queen's Gambit by Walter Tevis.

Still reading Unmasked: Inside Antifa's Radical Plan to Destroy Democracy by Andy Ngo.

Still reading Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow.

Still reading The Ruins of Gorlan by John Flanagan.

Started reading Night of the Hunter by R. A. Salvatore.
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
Finished Bone Silence, last of Reynolds' Revenger trilogy; to me Revenger is great, Shadow Captain good, and Bone Silence is OK. I think sometimes these series get drawn out by the publisher's attempts to capitalize on writers, forcing them to drag out or shoehorn in ideas that don't always fit good.

Next is a collection of Samuel R Delany shorts, his complete nebula award winners. I have read most before, but it's good enough I will read again.
 


Zaukrie

New Publisher
I thought once Tales of the Dying Earth got into the 2nd book, and it was an actual story, I'd like it more.....but it is till just kind of (FOR ME) stupid with stupid names. And the way women are treated is getting harder to take as I go along.....(I get it is a product of its time, but still). I am not sure I will ever finish it. Going to put it aside and read something else from the shelf.
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest
I just finished Antony Beevor's 2012 The Second World War and based on that and a recent documentary, I've checked Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich by Normal Ohler.
I also have Beria, My Father: Inside Stalin's Kremlin by Sergo Beria on request from the library.

Just one of my occasional deeper dives into WWII history...
 

Mercurius

Legend
Over the last six months or so I've been collecting a ton of mass market paperback science fiction and fantasy, mostly from the 60s-70s era. I am particularly drawn to that era of "New Wave" writing.

The last two books I read were Isle of the Dead by Roger Zelazny and Roadside Picnic by the Strugatsky brothers, which is the book that the Tarkovsky film Stalker was based on.

I just started Fourth Mansions by RA Lafferty. Great, very unique writing.

Next up... I don't know, but maybe another Strugatsky or JG Ballard or Richard Cowper or Kate Wilhelm or Joanna Russ. Or...
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
I just finished Antony Beevor's 2012 The Second World War and based on that and a recent documentary, I've checked Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich by Normal Ohler.
I also have Beria, My Father: Inside Stalin's Kremlin by Sergo Beria on request from the library.

Just one of my occasional deeper dives into WWII history...
Sounds interesting. Beria, though. shudder That man was creepy AF.
 

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