Taking Rules to Their Illogical Extremes

Fauchard1520

Explorer
The peasant rail gun. The bag of rats. The absurdity of minimalist disguises.

No sensible GM would allow this malarkey at a real table, but I've always always found great joy in taking rules to their illogical extremes. Most of the examples in my head come from D&D, but I'm curious what else is out there. What other "there's no explicit rule against it" type of shenanigans can you pull off?
 

Celebrim

Legend
@Ralif Redhammer : Spike Growth has been totally broken in tons of ways since the 3e era. The spell itself needs patching, and if they have retained all of its problems into the 5e era then yeah, it's pretty stupid. You don't even need to optimize in any particular way to use that spell to break games.
 

Staffan

Adventurer
Back in 3e, the rules for cities lead to absurdities like Waterdeep having thousands of galleons, not to mention billions of chickens, for sale.

The trap making rules combined with the crafting rules meant that building a camouflaged pit trap would cost 600 gp in raw material and take a reasonably-skilled craftsman (+10) 45 weeks to build. That's for a 10 ft deep pit.

(These two are my favorite examples to bring up when demonstrating that detailed rules do not necessarily mean realistic rules.)

Oh, and in the original version of TORG, you could easily make a regular human character that could run 250 meters in one 10-second combat round. You wouldn't be able to keep up the pace for long, but still...
 
Most of the examples in my head come from D&D, but I'm curious what else is out there. What other "there's no explicit rule against it" type of shenanigans can you pull off?
The Champions! filibuster: soliloquys take no time, so you could eat a whole gaming session with your turn, just by speaking in character for a few hours.
 

pemerton

Legend
These all seem to be the result of treating the mechanics as the primary input into the resulting fiction, rather than as a way of adjudicating whether or not an intent for the fiction comes about.
 

DrunkonDuty

Explorer
@Tony Vargas: No! Champions is the perfect game system! It can't possibly be abused...

Nah, I can't defend that.

One of my favourite Champions rules abuses is Mojito Man (or Woo Woo Woman; pick a cocktail best drunk from a banana lounge on a tropical beach somewhere.)

Basically it's mentalist who has sufficient telepathy to find a given target anywhere in the world. Once the target is located you start using you Scanners mind attack until the target's head explodes.
 

Phion

Explorer
Once I planted a bag of beans all at once, As far as I or the DM could tell the there was no issue with this.

It was Storms king thunder and we needed a diversion with the stone giants. 2 pyramids later bursting from the ground and a range of other wacky scenarios such as 2 mummies killing a few of the giants its safe to safe to say I did my job.
 
No! Champions is the perfect game system!
Skill Inflation. Being a lawyer in Champions II: 2pts. Lawyer package in FRED: like 60+ points.
It can't possibly be abused...
Nah, I can't defend that.
The thing I like about the Champions! filibuster is that it's strictly a rules hole, there's no system mastery or crazy builds or anything involved, and, in-game, it does nothing (your approximately 1-3 second 'phase' doesn't take any longer, even if you're reading from a phonebook* for hours at the table), it just allows you to be a huge jerk and hold the session for ransom (and it really doesn't, anymore, the GM can unilaterally invoke cloture, but it's funny).

Basically it's mentalist who has sufficient telepathy to find a given target anywhere in the world. Once the target is located you start using you Scanners mind attack until the target's head explodes.
There was an article in an AC about the craziest things you could do (pre BBB, when you kept getting 1/2 points for successive disadvantages, and could theoretically get like a thousand CP or something), one of them was The Landlord: his base is the entire world, everyone (it was only like 4 billion people at the time) is purchased as an agent, fanatically loyal to him! Or maybe it was the whole galaxy, I forget.

There are also things you can do in Champions! just by taking an unintuitive special effect, that /sound/ whacked but are actually fine. ;)
 
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DMMike

Game Masticator
Hmm. Good spot to break some of my own rules...

Modos 2 said:
Non-Actions: Your character isn't limited to a discrete set of actions each round. You can do anything else you want, as long as it wouldn't interfere with the other actions in the round...
So I can make three attacks with my three actions, open a door, go prone, get back up, check a chest for traps, cast a spell on myself, talk to my neighbor, ready my weapon, sheathe my weapon, knock an arrow, hide, craft a poison with which to coat my arrow...as long as I don't interfere with anyone else?

Modos 2 said:
Large Size Perk: You are much bigger than the average person. . .
Hmm. There's no table, or restriction. I'll take Storm Giant-size, please.

(Thank the gods for Rule Zero!)
 

Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
Basically it's mentalist who has sufficient telepathy to find a given target anywhere in the world. Once the target is located you start using you Scanners mind attack until the target's head explodes.
In Mutants and Masterminds that's the Bathroom Mentalist. It effectively lets your character participate while taking a shower, or using other facilities.
 

DrunkonDuty

Explorer
There was an article in an AC about the craziest things you could do (pre BBB, when you kept getting 1/2 points for successive disadvantages, and could theoretically get like a thousand CP or something), one of them was The Landlord: his base is the entire world, everyone (it was only like 4 billion people at the time) is purchased as an agent, fanatically loyal to him! Or maybe it was the whole galaxy, I forget.

There are also things you can do in Champions! just by taking an unintuitive special effect, that /sound/ whacked but are actually fine. ;)
Oh yeah! The Landlord! That was a good one.
 

Campbell

Relaxed Intensity
In games that reward participation experience the thing where everyone gets really interested in mundane matters because they need that one last special power before facing that big bad whatever.
 

hawkeyefan

Explorer
Falling damage in just about any edition of D&D.

Player: How far of a drop?
DM: 80 Feet.
Player: Ragnar jumps off.
DM: um it’s an 80 foot drop.
Player: Yeah, 8d6 maxes at 48 HP and I have 132. No biggie.
DM: But....but he’d almost assuredly die.
Player: Apparently not in this world.
DM: .....
 
Falling damage in just about any edition of D&D.

Player: How far of a drop?
DM: 80 Feet.
Player: Ragnar jumps off.
DM: um it’s an 80 foot drop.
Player: Yeah, 8d6 maxes at 48 HP and I have 132. No biggie.
DM: But....but he’d almost assuredly die.
Player: Apparently not in this world.
DM: .....
This isn't an illogical extreme, it's the rules functioning as intended.

Ragnar would not "almost assuredly" die from falling off an 80 foot drop, because he has 132 hit points, or less succinctly because he's a name-level warrior whom you would expect to walk away unscathed from the first couple of times he falls off a cliff in a given day.

How is this different than being able to tank a Colossal dragon's breath weapon and then beat the same dragon to death with his bare hands?

Captain America thinks parachutes are for girls. It's a feature.
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
To be fair, I've never seen anything like this actually work out in real play.

I've seen to quad-classed characters, seeking some optimal build. The one was fairly useless towards truly powerful opponents because their spell DCs and to-hit bonuses were so low. The other one was a one-trick-pony that didn't even get their one trick right. They were based around charming their opponents, and of course conveniently missed that the target gets advantage if other people have been attacking them.

Jesus. This is why I stick to low level D&D.
 

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