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Taking Rules to Their Illogical Extremes

Tom B1

Explorer
There's also a meta-game issue, where it feels like the player is being punished by having to play a broken character, when they would be allowed to bring in a healthy new character if the first character had actually died. You can solve that by requiring any new character to enter the game at a lower level (or whatever) than the old character, but the disparity has to be pretty significant for the player to actually appreciate being broken rather than dying entirely, and that can feel like a no-win situation.

We let people retire injured characters if they wished, but new PCs came in with 2/3 avg party XP so they usually came in 1-2 levels down and stayed behind a while.

We also generally were more of a gritty group so scars and missing eyes and fingers were things that showed your character's experience and his ability to survive bad things. We had one character get a dwarf-made multi-socket for his missing hand - he could snap in a sword, axe, hammer, a primitive gripper, a spring loaded dagger, or some other bits. Sometimes he just used a huge fist as his second weapon.

And when people had gargoyle claw furrows on their heads, the locals knew they were tough and didn't usually give them much fuss. (I think we gave increased intimidation mods for some serious scarring).

It also applied to NPCs, repeat villains, and foes. So if you broke a major foes' arm, that meant you were more able to take him down.

The truth is some of the middle level PCs (our party was usually scattered over 4 levels from lowest to highest at any given time) and that didn't matter. Generally, how smart you played and how well you could figure out what the enemy du jour was up to was more critical than your stats. Sure, the strongest fighter could stand the longest and take the biggest hits, but he didn't advance the larger picture as often as the rogue or the mage.

Aside: Not game breaking, but hilarious -> One of our Champions PCs who had a public identity as a super successful athlete / hero decided at one point he had a few points to spend and got the insane notion to buy "Faster-Than-Light Travel, usable only in a vacuum' along with some other strictures so it was pretty cheap. Now, we were not playing a star hopping game. We were city bound. The PC had no flight or life support. When asked why, he smiled like the Cheshire Cat and said "Lance fast!". (lol!)

I once played a tactical space combat ruleset called Red Chicken Rising (I am not making that up). It was the only wargame rules to date to begin with a shower scene I believe. It was a bit tongue and cheek but played okay. However, that was if you used the standard pre-designed ships. They had beam weapons, shields, and boarding parties (some of each). When one of our guys looked at the build system, the designers had made thrust and boarding parties pretty cheap (vs. guns and shields) and most of the time, boarding didn't happen.... unless you designed custom large ships with LOTS of thrust and LOTS of boarding parties and nothing else. Then your fast moving boarding torpedo with a batttalion embarked that could be purchased for half the cost of a cruiser made for a game breaker. "Hi, we're taking your ship. Resistance is futile."
 

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DrunkonDuty

Adventurer
Aside: Not game breaking, but hilarious -> One of our Champions PCs who had a public identity as a super successful athlete / hero decided at one point he had a few points to spend and got the insane notion to buy "Faster-Than-Light Travel, usable only in a vacuum' along with some other strictures so it was pretty cheap. Now, we were not playing a star hopping game. We were city bound. The PC had no flight or life support. When asked why, he smiled like the Cheshire Cat and said "Lance fast!". (lol!)

LOL indeed.
 

I recall in the 1E of Legend of the Five Rings, one of the samurai techniques allowed you to move and make another attack if you killed a creature, with no listed limit. Theoretically you could have a line of hinin/eta (non-people social caste) lined up, and move across the empire in 5 seconds.

Falling damage in just about any edition of D&D.

Player: How far of a drop?
DM: 80 Feet.
Player: Ragnar jumps off.
DM: um it’s an 80 foot drop.
Player: Yeah, 8d6 maxes at 48 HP and I have 132. No biggie.
DM: But....but he’d almost assuredly die.
Player: Apparently not in this world.
DM: .....
This is why I immediately house ruled back to the original falling damage, which was cumulative (I cap at 45d6). Falling 80 ft would be 1d6+2d6+3d6+4d6+5d6+6d6+7d6+8d6= 36d6. While the average would just barely allow them to survive (126 damage), the max would obliterate them. This makes falling actually threatening at high level, rather than allowing every character perform a super-hero landing.
 

Halloween Horror For 5E

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