The Final Announcement from The Descent Live Stream: Eberron Hardcover

The final announcement at the end of The Descent stream is a hardcover book for the Eberron setting!
No details have been announced, but Nathan Stewart closed out the live stream event for The Descent by proclaiming the final book out this year would be a hardcover setting book for Eberron.
 
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Darryl Mott

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gyor

Adventurer
Not really. They play to different campaign hooks, themes, and even aesthetics.

Most of Khorvaire is actually rural. Many of the nations that broke away from the Five Nations of Galifar are also fairly non-urban too. And the nation of Cyre, which used to contain many major cities, also is now a smoldering wild magic wasteland. Across the ocean, both Aerenal and Xen'drik are mostly jungles. While the urban fantasy and cityscapes are commonly marketed for Eberron, it has a LOT of wilderness, nature, and rural areas.

The way it was intended? If you knew anything about Eberron, then you would know that is ignorance talking. Let's look at #1 on the list of 10 Things You Need to Know About Eberron (ECS p.8): "If it exists in D&D, then it has a place in Eberron."

Eberron was intentionally written to be inclusive of all D&D content at the time of 3E. In fact, 3E arguably does not even represent Eberron "the way it was intended" once you realize how much was changed, inserted, and rewritten from Baker's initial draft and sales pitch to the final product. WotC basically reworked Baker's Eberron for 3E fairly extensively. Fairly certain, for example, that shifters, warforged, and kalashtar were actually "forced" into Eberron by WotC because Wizards wanted Eberron to feature new character options. Halflings riding dinosaurs also came into the picture at the point when WotC was editing the project. This is not to discredit the creative genius or input of Keith Baker, but Eberron was a a team effort and "the way it was intended" emphasizes point #1 above: Eberron is inclusive of whatever D&D content you want to use.
How do you know what was forced into Eberron by WotC? Just curious.
 
"Tens of thousands of years ago the dragons of Argonessen established a garrison of dragonborn in what is now Q'barra."
-Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
How do you know what was forced into Eberron by WotC? Just curious.
Sure. Now the word "forced" is admittedly a bit of a strong word, which is why I put it in quotes. It is more accurate to say that WotC had a "shaping hand" on how Eberron developed. Keith Baker has made various statements online (e.g., his blog, Twitter, etc.) about how Eberron changed from his initial drafts to the final product under the guidance of Bill Slavicsek and with James Wyatt.

This fairly recent blog post interviewing Bill Slavicsek delves into a little bit of how Eberron developed. It's worth noting that the intent of Eberron from the beginning - and what made Eberron attractive as a choice for Slavicsek - was how Eberron did not attempt to invalidate D&D content.
 
So I noticed a few comments on how people think the new Eberron book will just rehash the Wayfinder's Guide. So I thought, just for people's use, I might compare what's actually in the Guide compared to the new structure of hardcover setting books set with Ravnica.

Wayfinder's Guide;
- Ch 1: What is Eberron? (General Setting Lore), 16 pages
- Ch 2: Welcome to Khorvair (Lore about the continent), 38 pgs
- Ch 3: Races of Eberron, 30 pgs
- Ch 4: Dragonmarked Houses, 24 pgs
- Ch 5: Magic Items, 10 pgs
- Ch 6: Sharn, City of Towers (Lore on the city and backgrounds), 41 pgs

Hardcover Setting Book:
- General Setting Lore, 4 pgs
- Ch 1: Character Creation (races, classes, subclasses), 18 pgs
- Ch 2: Guilds (for Eberron this will likely be more backgrounds/dragonmarks material), 70 pgs
- Ch 3: City Lore, 24 pgs
- Ch 4: Creating Adventures, 50 pgs
- Ch 5: Treasures (Magic items and more), 10 pgs
- Ch 6: Friends and Foes (Monsters/NPCs), 73 pgs

You can avoid a lot of overlap by following the new hardcover format, if you include new material for lore, Dragonmarked Houses, backgrounds and magic items. Then fill the rest with creating adventures and statblocks and you’ve got a book.
 

Parmandur

Legend
So I noticed a few comments on how people think the new Eberron book will just rehash the Wayfinder's Guide. So I thought, just for people's use, I might compare what's actually in the Guide compared to the new structure of hardcover setting books set with Ravnica.

Wayfinder's Guide;
- Ch 1: What is Eberron? (General Setting Lore), 16 pages
- Ch 2: Welcome to Khorvair (Lore about the continent), 38 pgs
- Ch 3: Races of Eberron, 30 pgs
- Ch 4: Dragonmarked Houses, 24 pgs
- Ch 5: Magic Items, 10 pgs
- Ch 6: Sharn, City of Towers (Lore on the city and backgrounds), 41 pgs

Hardcover Setting Book:
- General Setting Lore, 4 pgs
- Ch 1: Character Creation (races, classes, subclasses), 18 pgs
- Ch 2: Guilds (for Eberron this will likely be more backgrounds/dragonmarks material), 70 pgs
- Ch 3: City Lore, 24 pgs
- Ch 4: Creating Adventures, 50 pgs
- Ch 5: Treasures (Magic items and more), 10 pgs
- Ch 6: Friends and Foes (Monsters/NPCs), 73 pgs

You can avoid a lot of overlap by following the new hardcover format, if you include new material for lore, Dragonmarked Houses, backgrounds and magic items. Then fill the rest with creating adventures and statblocks and you’ve got a book.
The Unearthed Arcana material that they took from the book totals 22 pages. I would expect, based on what WotC has said, that is most of the 175 pages that will see re-use. And it is already free!
 

Aaron L

Adventurer
While I really don't care for Eberron as a setting (the "magic as technology" trope is just too twee for me and rubs me the wrong way) I am very happy for the people who do love the setting, and look forward to the book because, even though I'm not a fan of the world, I'm assuming there still be at least a few things in the book that will be interesting new additions to use in my games.

As for the psionic Mystic class, don't forget that Eberron has an entire PC race consisting of the shards of psionic spirits cohabitating with human souls in psychically empowered human bodies. I wouldn't at all be surprised if the Mystic class was included in the Eberron setting book so you can play full-on psychic Kalashtar. My only wish for the Mystic (and my only grievance with 5E psionics, which I absolutely adore) is that they would use a different goshdang name for the class(!); Mystic is just so wrong for the name of the Psionic power-using class. Why not just use the good old name "Psionicist?" Or even better yet, why not just call the psychic class "the Psychic?" Naming a class based on psychic powers "the Psychic" is seriously kind of a no-brainer, while calling the psionic class "the Mystic" is just slightly extremely confusing. In my experience, the term "mystic" as used in modern fantasy/speculative fiction of all stripes has just about always been associated with magic.

But now that we know an Eberron setting book is coming out, I think it's a fairly safe bet that all the work on 5E psionics has been for that book rather than for a Dark Sun setting book, and to my mind that kind of explains the reason behind "the Mystic" name: it's being named for Kalasthar mysticism. I still don't like it, and would much, much prefer they just called the psychic class "the Psychic," I can at least understand why they've done it, as much as I totally disagree with it.

While I absolutely love the mechanics they've created for 5E psionics, the name of the class really irks me.
 

lkj

Explorer
While I really don't care for Eberron as a setting (the "magic as technology" trope is just too twee for me and rubs me the wrong way) I am very happy for the people who do love the setting, and look forward to the book because, even though I'm not a fan of the world, I'm assuming there still be at least a few things in the book that will be interesting new additions to use in my games.

As for the psionic Mystic class, don't forget that Eberron has an entire PC race consisting of the shards of psionic spirits cohabitating with human souls in psychically empowered human bodies. I wouldn't at all be surprised if the Mystic class was included in the Eberron setting book so you can play full-on psychic Kalashtar. My only wish for the Mystic (and my only grievance with 5E psionics, which I absolutely adore) is that they would use a different goshdang name for the class(!); Mystic is just so wrong for the name of the Psionic power-using class. Why not just use the good old name "Psionicist?" Or even better yet, why not just call the psychic class "the Psychic?" Naming a class based on psychic powers "the Psychic" is seriously kind of a no-brainer, while calling the psionic class "the Mystic" is just slightly extremely confusing. In my experience, the term "mystic" as used in modern fantasy/speculative fiction of all stripes has just about always been associated with magic.

But now that we know an Eberron setting book is coming out, I think it's a fairly safe bet that all the work on 5E psionics has been for that book rather than for a Dark Sun setting book, and to my mind that kind of explains the reason behind "the Mystic" name: it's being named for Kalasthar mysticism. I still don't like it, and would much, much prefer they just called the psychic class "the Psychic," I can at least understand why they've done it, as much as I totally disagree with it.

While I absolutely love the mechanics they've created for 5E psionics, the name of the class really irks me.

So, I've got a good news/bad news thing here for you.

The good news: Mearls, back when he was doing Happy Fun Hour and working on psionics, changed the name from Mystic to Psion. While this wasn't a final, final decision, it seemed like the way they were leaning.

The bad news: Mearls was doing a major re-work of psionics. He'd created several psionic subclasses and was completely reworking the psionic classes. So if you like the original UA, you might not like the new direction. That said, I really thought he was putting together something very cool.

I'd also say the bad news #2 is that it seems very unlikely all that work was for Eberron. The only setting Mearls mentioned as needing psionics at the core was Dark Sun. And the state of the mechanics as he left them definitely needed a lot more playtesting (since they were brand new). And we haven't seen any of that.

If you're interested in what he was doing, this page has a nice summary:

https://thinkdm.org/hfh/


But it's important to remember that these were mostly first passes where he was working through ideas. Not anywhere near final.

AD
 

Parmandur

Legend
While I really don't care for Eberron as a setting (the "magic as technology" trope is just too twee for me and rubs me the wrong way) I am very happy for the people who do love the setting, and look forward to the book because, even though I'm not a fan of the world, I'm assuming there still be at least a few things in the book that will be interesting new additions to use in my games.

As for the psionic Mystic class, don't forget that Eberron has an entire PC race consisting of the shards of psionic spirits cohabitating with human souls in psychically empowered human bodies. I wouldn't at all be surprised if the Mystic class was included in the Eberron setting book so you can play full-on psychic Kalashtar. My only wish for the Mystic (and my only grievance with 5E psionics, which I absolutely adore) is that they would use a different goshdang name for the class(!); Mystic is just so wrong for the name of the Psionic power-using class. Why not just use the good old name "Psionicist?" Or even better yet, why not just call the psychic class "the Psychic?" Naming a class based on psychic powers "the Psychic" is seriously kind of a no-brainer, while calling the psionic class "the Mystic" is just slightly extremely confusing. In my experience, the term "mystic" as used in modern fantasy/speculative fiction of all stripes has just about always been associated with magic.

But now that we know an Eberron setting book is coming out, I think it's a fairly safe bet that all the work on 5E psionics has been for that book rather than for a Dark Sun setting book, and to my mind that kind of explains the reason behind "the Mystic" name: it's being named for Kalasthar mysticism. I still don't like it, and would much, much prefer they just called the psychic class "the Psychic," I can at least understand why they've done it, as much as I totally disagree with it.

While I absolutely love the mechanics they've created for 5E psionics, the name of the class really irks me.
I have good news, and bad news.

The good news is they are not using the name "Mystic," and are going with "Psion" moving forwards.

The bad news is they scrapped what they had done and went back to the drawing board. The Psion is nowhere near primetime. The Kalashtar do not necessitate the full Class, any more than the Gith in MToF do.
 

Satyrn

Villager
[MENTION=42037]Ik[/MENTION]j and [MENTION=6780330]Parmandur[/MENTION] managed the incredibly difficult feat of a two-poster double-post.

You get a cookie! And you get a cookie! (And no one else gets a cookie! I ain't Oprah.)
 

ModernApathy

Explorer
I stopped playing TTRPG's around the time Eberron was originally being released for 3E, so I've never really knew much about it (other than the warforged).
Having come back to D&D with 5E, I was always interested in Eberron as one of the few settings I was unfamiliar with, and so I picked up the Wayfinders pdf when it released, and I was impressed with it. I could see pretty quickly why it won the comp to design a setting back in the day, it seemed to overflow with cool ideas. I'm happy to see that expanded on in a hardcover.

So, yeah, I would have loved some old 2E settings like Planescape updated for 5E, but I'm looking forward to getting this when it comes out.
I really hope they put out a line of mini's to go with it.
 

Staffan

Adventurer
I'm hoping this means that Wizkids will put out some Eberron-themed Nolzur miniatures. Some warforged, shifters, changelings, and artificers, perhaps (kalashtar are pretty much identical to humans, at least on a miniatures scale).
 

Staffan

Adventurer
Since psionics is not a central feature of Eberron (at least not of campaigns that take place in Khorvaire), a simple option would be to make a Mind Mage sorcerer. I don't think there's enough depth in the sorcerer class to cover psionics in a psionics-heavy setting like Dark Sun, but it should work well enough for having the occasional dude with weird mental powers.
 
Since psionics is not a central feature of Eberron (at least not of campaigns that take place in Khorvaire), a simple option would be to make a Mind Mage sorcerer. I don't think there's enough depth in the sorcerer class to cover psionics in a psionics-heavy setting like Dark Sun, but it should work well enough for having the occasional dude with weird mental powers.
I feel like if they do Psionics (at that feels like a given at this point, but hey, WotC headquarters could explode before they get it out) they're gonna bundle Dark Sun with it, like they're doing with the Artificer and Eberron.
 

Azzy

Cyclone Ranger
I feel like if they do Psionics (at that feels like a given at this point, but hey, WotC headquarters could explode before they get it out) they're gonna bundle Dark Sun with it, like they're doing with the Artificer and Eberron.
Yeah, I see this as the most likely path they'll take.
 

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