log in or register to remove this ad

 

D&D 5E The New D&D Book: Candlekeep Mysteries: 17 Mystery Adventures [UPDATED!]

The cover of the upcoming D&D book has been revealed! Candlekeep Mysteries is an anthology of 17 mystery-themed adventures for character levels 1-16.

Screen Shot 2021-01-11 at 6.35.34 PM.png


The image has appeared on Penguin Random House's product page for the book.



UPDATE! Penguin's product page appears to have now vanished, but we now have the product description! Thanks to @Fezzwick for spotting that!

An anthology of seventeen mystery-themed adventures for the world’s greatest roleplaying game.

Candlekeep attracts scholars like a flame attracts moths. Historians, sages, and others who crave knowledge flock to this library fortress to peruse its vast collection of books, scribbled into which are the answers to the mysteries that bedevil them. Many of these books contain their own mysteries ̶—each one a doorway to adventure. Dare you cross that threshold?

· 17 mystery-themed D&D adventures, each tied to a book discovered in the famed library fortress of Candlekeep
· Easy to run as stand-alone mini adventures or to drop into your home campaign
· Adventures span play from levels 1 to 16
· Includes a full poster map of Candlekeep, plus detailed descriptions of the various locations, characters, and creatures that reside within it
· Introduces a variety of Dungeons & Dragons monsters, items, and non-player characters (NPCs)

Candlekeep Mysteries is a collection of seventeen short, stand-alone D&D adventures designed for characters of levels 1–16. Each adventure begins with the discovery of a book, and each book is the key to a door behind which danger and glory await. These adventures can be run as one-shot games, plugged into an existing Forgotten Realms campaign, or adapted for other campaign settings. This book also includes a poster map of the library fortress and detailed descriptions of Candlekeep and its inhabitants.


There have been mentions of an upcoming adventure anthology since 2019, with Kate Welch's name attached, along with other celebrity adventure writers including Critical Role's Marisha Ray, and actor Deborah Ann Woll. There were also suggestions that the authors might all be women. I guess we’ll find out tomorrow!

 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

No RPG can handle a Sherlock Holmes/Hercule Poirot style detective story well, since it either requires the PLAYER to be brilliant enough to assemble the clues, or reduces things to an unsatisfactory skill roll and the GM explaining the solution.
You sort of can, but it doesn't quite work out the same way narratively. The trick is you, and the players, have to be comfortable enough with the party failing (at least a little) and experiencing (some) frustration. This can be handled with partial successes rather than outright failures. E.g the party foil a crime, only to realise the whole thing may have been a distraction for something else. They round up a conspiracy, except for the one shadowy conspirator, who none of the others can clearly identify who slipped away.

Basically a long enough timeline can can take the place of brilliance, but you have to keep the game feeling like progress as they slowly get the chance to assemble the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. The trick is making sure the game doesn't get stuck for too long at the point where the players are just spinning their heels unaware of how to perceive. (Basically you need to be able to do the thing from the police drama where they cops get taken off the case to do something else until another opportunity arises to move forward).
 

log in or register to remove this ad

You sort of can, but it doesn't quite work out the same way narratively. The trick is you, and the players, have to be comfortable enough with the party failing (at least a little) and experiencing (some) frustration. This can be handled with partial successes rather than outright failures. E.g the party foil a crime, only to realise the whole thing may have been a distraction for something else. They round up a conspiracy, except for the one shadowy conspirator, who none of the others can clearly identify who slipped away.

Basically a long enough timeline can can take the place of brilliance, but you have to keep the game feeling like progress as they slowly get the chance to assemble the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. The trick is making sure the game doesn't get stuck for too long at the point where the players are just spinning their heels unaware of how to perceive. (Basically you need to be able to do the thing from the police drama where they cops get taken off the case to do something else until another opportunity arises to move forward).
Then it wouldn't be a Holmes/Poirot style story.

I.e. you stat from the assumption that the detective is not a genius.

Which works perfectly well in D&D. But the "genius detective" trope is the one that has lodged in many people's minds, and what leads them to the false assumption that D&D can't do mysteries.

Of course, any adventure where the players don't know exactly what they will be fighting from the start is technically a mystery.
 

Not particularly excited about this. I already have tons of premade adventures and can easily make my own. Just like I have more than enough monsters to run entire campaigns without the players encountering the same monster twice.
I really would love to see some other settings, though.
 



TheSword

Legend
Supporter
People raged about dungeon magazine bring canned and lamented it’s loss because it had short 10-16 page adventures, easily fitting into a campaign, and giving an opportunity to new talent...

...We had a thread a couple of months back, inspired by a top tier designer. How poorly new designers were treated by big firms and how hard it is to break into the industry...

...Along comes an anthology by up and coming designers by the largest RPG company in the world... chorus of “I’m not buying that”.

You know what? I’m not planning on buying a Gucci handbag but I don’t crow about it on the internet.
 

TheSword

Legend
Supporter
D&D has Diplomacy, Deception, Intimidation, Perception, Investigation, History, Arcana, Religion, Nature, class abilities that improve these things, fantastic creatures, fantastic places, fantastic organizations, investigation magic, and things that prevent investigation magic. Most importantly, PCs have opportunities to interact with the world. There are plenty of opportunities to convert earlier editions adventures or other systems, because let’s be honest most mysteries are system agnostic.

I’m currently running an adventure where someone in the party gets given a parcel by a courier who has confused the name slightly. This starts a mystery of who was the parcel really for and why do the want the highly controversial contents. It could easily be adapted for 5e.

[Edit] I’m also half way the second part of the Rise of the Runelords adventure path. That has a very well detailed haunted house to explore and try to get to the bottom of what happened.

Don’t tell me 5e can’t do mysteries.
 
Last edited:

tetrasodium

Hero
Supporter
No RPG can handle a Sherlock Holmes/Hercule Poirot style detective story well, since it either requires the PLAYER to be brilliant enough to assemble the clues, or reduces things to an unsatisfactory skill roll and the GM explaining the solution.

Fortunately, most mystery stories are not like that. From the Hard Boiled detective subgenre*, to the Famous Five, to modern police procedurals, most mystery stories simply involve following a trail of fairly obvious clues (just like a treasure hunt) punctuated by regular fights, chases, or other action sequences that put our dogged detectives in jeopardy. D&D can do that perfectly well.


* The Dixon Hill parody in Star Trek TNG calls this out - every story begins with someone bursting into the office with a gun.
Fate can do it because sherlock's player can do things to create clues and such. Plus depending on a bunch of things the players might know just as much as the GM
 

People raged about dungeon magazine bring canned and lamented it’s loss because it had short 10-16 page adventures, easily fitting into a campaign, and giving an opportunity to new talent...

...We had a thread a couple of months back, inspired by a top tier designer. How poorly new designers were treated by big firms and how hard it is to break into the industry...

...Along comes an anthology by up and coming designers by the largest RPG company in the world... chorus of “I’m not buying that”.

You know what? I’m not planning on buying a Gucci handbag but I don’t crow about it on the internet.
Well maybe on a forum dedicated to haute couture?
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
We now have a product description thanks to @Fezzwick!

An anthology of seventeen mystery-themed adventures for the world’s greatest roleplaying game.

Candlekeep attracts scholars like a flame attracts moths. Historians, sages, and others who crave knowledge flock to this library fortress to peruse its vast collection of books, scribbled into which are the answers to the mysteries that bedevil them. Many of these books contain their own mysteries ̶—each one a doorway to adventure. Dare you cross that threshold?

· 17 mystery-themed D&D adventures, each tied to a book discovered in the famed library fortress of Candlekeep
· Easy to run as stand-alone mini adventures or to drop into your home campaign
· Adventures span play from levels 1 to 16
· Includes a full poster map of Candlekeep, plus detailed descriptions of the various locations, characters, and creatures that reside within it
· Introduces a variety of Dungeons & Dragons monsters, items, and non-player characters (NPCs)

Candlekeep Mysteries is a collection of seventeen short, stand-alone D&D adventures designed for characters of levels 1–16. Each adventure begins with the discovery of a book, and each book is the key to a door behind which danger and glory await. These adventures can be run as one-shot games, plugged into an existing Forgotten Realms campaign, or adapted for other campaign settings. This book also includes a poster map of the library fortress and detailed descriptions of Candlekeep and its inhabitants.
 
Last edited:

tetrasodium

Hero
Supporter
People raged about dungeon magazine bring canned and lamented it’s loss because it had short 10-16 page adventures, easily fitting into a campaign, and giving an opportunity to new talent...

...We had a thread a couple of months back, inspired by a top tier designer. How poorly new designers were treated by big firms and how hard it is to break into the industry...

...Along comes an anthology by up and coming designers by the largest RPG company in the world... chorus of “I’m not buying that”.

You know what? I’m not planning on buying a Gucci handbag but I don’t crow about it on the internet.
A lot of people said that because d
Wotc still isn't ready to give up the death grip that FR has on everything they publish
 

This has made me to remember there is RPG "Hardboiled" about investigations, by the Spanish publisher "La Marca del Este". And time ago TSR published "gang-busters", didn't it? And I had forgoten the children books about little investigators, for example the famous five, the five find-outers, Alfred Hitckos and the three investigators, or the TV serie "the adventures of Shirley Holmes". I mean thys type of mistery stories have to be different, not only to avoid mature content, but also children detective can't use expensive technology to search clues.

And I am afair an investigation game may be too railroad. It is not easy to continue when the PCs don't find those necessary clues.

I guess here WotC's goal is to get more experience about mistery modules, because later these will be neccesary when Ravenloft had got its revival.

* Now FR is the most powerful D&D brand, and I guess because thanks those smash-hits videogames. We could bet if a no-FR videogame also is a superhit, then that world also will come back to the printers.
 

Any short adventure is going to be a railroad.

The element of choice comes in:

a) The party can decline the case;

b) The party can fail to solve the case.
 

Nilbog

Snotling Herder
I'm really excited for this, as I find these type of adventures more difficult to create than dungeon crawls, also as I DM PF2E the fact that adventures that aren't so crunch heavy are easier to convert, it should make it fairly easy for me to drop them into my campaign.

👍
 


People raged about dungeon magazine bring canned and lamented it’s loss because it had short 10-16 page adventures, easily fitting into a campaign, and giving an opportunity to new talent...

...We had a thread a couple of months back, inspired by a top tier designer. How poorly new designers were treated by big firms and how hard it is to break into the industry...

...Along comes an anthology by up and coming designers by the largest RPG company in the world... chorus of “I’m not buying that”.
I'm buying it. It's just the sort of thing I can use.
You know what? I’m not planning on buying a Gucci handbag but I don’t crow about it on the internet.
Too late, you just did! :p
 


Not particularly excited about this. I already have tons of premade adventures and can easily make my own. Just like I have more than enough monsters to run entire campaigns without the players encountering the same monster twice.
I really would love to see some other settings, though.
I don't follow the logic in that. You can get through lots of adventures and monsters, but you only need one setting.
 

akr71

Adventurer
I have seen a few comments that new players or younger players may have trouble with a 'mystery' adventure. Not all WotC publications are geared toward new players - 5E is entering year 7 (I think ... haven't finished my coffee yet). Nor should they be. Even WotC has said that level 5-10 is the sweet spot, so even experienced players start over at level 1 every now and again.
 

HawaiiSteveO

Explorer
Color me intrigued! Like others, I hope it's all new content not rehashed stuff. 'Mystery-themed' is broad enough, guessing the adventures were designed more with focus on the exploration and social interaction pillars of the game?

On top of that, will likely be $30 on DDB, so I'll be getting 17 shorter adventures for around $2.25 CAD each which is cheaper than Dmsguild!
Sweet GIF by swerk
 

Advertisement1

Latest threads

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top