The official Brag On Your Players thread

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I'm home, sick with a chest cold. Help me feel better with some wholesome feel-good vibes about your friends. Tell me a story about your players, and something awesome they did in character (or out-of-character).

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Here's mine.

Background: we were rolling up brand-new characters for the start of a year-long campaign. We used the 4d6 method, and I have a house rule that says you can reroll your stats if the total of all your ability bonuses and penalties is +4 or lower.

So anyway, one of my players rolled fairly well, except for a natural 4. I reminded him that he could reroll his stats if he wanted to, but he shrugged and said "nah, I'm good. It's just a number anyway." Then he put it in Dexterity, of all things, like a boss. Other players told him that was a bad move, dex is one of the most important stats in the game, etc., and he just shrugged and said "yeah, but I'm into it. I've got a cool idea about how my character mangled his leg in a tunnel accident."

And so begins the tale of Tili Anvil-Born, the dwarven cleric with a steel leg brace.

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So brag about your players. Tell me a story about them being awesome.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker
It's not exactly like that--it's not about a player accepting that stiff a disadvantage--but I have a player in the two campaigns I run who takes extensive notes on the sessions, and posts them where people can see them. Campaign 1 is 42 sessions in, and the notes run to 489 pages in Google Docs; campaign 2 is 9 sessions in, and the notes are 69 pages long through session 8 (the amanuensis is working on session 9, next session is this coming Wednesday). It makes my life much easier, because I improvise a lot, and the sessions are every other week, and all I have to do is go look at the notes to find what I did four or fourteen sessions ago. I wouldn't be able to run these campaigns anything like the same way without the notes.
 

Bitbrain

Adventurer
My players gave me a standing ovation last session.

It may not seem like much, but I was in a pretty bleak place (emotionally speaking) at the time, and the sight of them looking down and smiling at me did a lot of good and helped me get through the next week.
 

pogre

Adventurer
I have a group of decent human beings who cooperate to make the game a positive experience for everyone at the table. Seems like a minor thing, but something I have really come to appreciate over the years.

Plus, they bring snacks! I have big table and yet sometimes I have to move tons of snack just to lay down more scenery!
 

Jediking

Explorer
I've run for the same group for nearly 4 years now - five players who have careers, fiances/girlfriends, family lives, other hobbies. Plenty of other things to spend time and energy on in this wide world of ours.

But (nearly) every single Tuesday, they decide that rolling some dice and playing make-believe with bad accents is the best choice they can make, and we have been consistent and are now on our 3rd extended campaign. So I feel something must be going right.



On a more "player" note, one guy is always a "Neutral-Good" character who really tends to go scorched-earth on perceived evil doers. He is currently playing a Human Light Cleric who had lost her family in a fire, and now views flames as a cleansing way to die. And she sure likes to cleanse others.
 
Probably the most noteworthy thing that comes to mind was in my first 5E campaign. I was running a Greyhawk campaign using a series of awesome adventures that I tied together into a fairly cohesive story. During one of the adventures, they rescued a female wood elf ranger who was captured by giants (she was the survivor of a failed scouting mission). After the adventure, I decided to have her stick around as a love interest to the high elf PC (eldritch knight archer), and gave her PC type stats.

Several sessions later, they're in the Hall of the Fire Giant King, and the party is trapped by a patrol of giants. They're hidden behind a secret door in a passage, but the hall is the only way out. Resources are low, and a long rest is impossible, as some of the giants know about the secret passage. The NPC offers to move to the other side of the secret passage, create a diversion, then run back into the secret passage, giving the others time to escape as they chase her. With her stealth, she could evade capture on her own, and would (theoretically) escape afterwards.

The distraction didn't work, as the giants managed to roll better initiative (-1 vs. +9) and killed her in one round (dead dead, not unconscious). The party burst out of the secret passage and attacked with everything they had. It was a furious battle, and I couldn't figure out why. After a few rounds, I heard one of the players say "hurry up, we've only got a few rounds left!" They were attacking the giants in a near suicidal run... so the Paladin could cast Revivify on the NPC! I was amazed at how much they cared for her; despite not being a PC, she was "one of their own."

It's not exactly like that--it's not about a player accepting that stiff a disadvantage--but I have a player in the two campaigns I run who takes extensive notes on the sessions, and posts them where people can see them. Campaign 1 is 42 sessions in, and the notes run to 489 pages in Google Docs; campaign 2 is 9 sessions in, and the notes are 69 pages long through session 8 (the amanuensis is working on session 9, next session is this coming Wednesday). It makes my life much easier, because I improvise a lot, and the sessions are every other week, and all I have to do is go look at the notes to find what I did four or fourteen sessions ago. I wouldn't be able to run these campaigns anything like the same way without the notes.
We had someone who tried this, and it didn't go well. The lag on loading the documents was awful! I've usually been a careful notetaker, so I always appreciate it when a player takes really good notes.
 
Infiltrating a lizardfolk warcamp to assassinate lizard king and his disguised night hag advisor.

Party slips in through the swamps via water breathing, then wizard casts Mordenkainen's private sanctum while underwater but near ruins where recon reported the lizard king and night hag to be. This prevents the night hag from escaping to another plane.

Invisible gaseous form paladin backstabs lizard king dead. But it's a decoy!

Wizard nukes the night hag after blocking her physical escape route. Night hag is dead.

Real lizard king flees on quetzalcoatlus. Rogue rides hasted druid wildshaped into giant eagle, catches up to real lizard king, who tries to teleport-grapple rogue. Rogue shakes him off. Lizard king floats down to ground safely. Rogue dive tackle kills him (and flays his corpse as a trophy).

Total party win.
 
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Stormonu

Hero
I had gotten to the point in my life where I was feeling like playing RPG games was a thing of the past. Been there, done that - put the t-shirt in a drawer somewhere.
A coworker got the D&D bug and I tentatively offered to DM a game, expecting he'd switch to the local FLGS group. Almost a year later and the expanded group I'm playing with has been a joyous blast as we burn through Ghosts of Saltmarsh - it's been years since I've enjoyed a good game of D&D and I am thankful for my enthusiastic crew who makes it a delight to see the game through the wonderment of a group of players encountering all this stuff for the first time.
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
We had one player who wanted to RP a certain character class/race, that at the time had one of the hardest min requirements needed. In that campaign, if your PC died, you cannot get the exact same class again.

We had it where you roll the 4d6, assign them afterwards, and can subtract 2 from one score to add 1 to another, etc.

You could see the pain in his eye, his scores were not high enough.

Ok, this will be your backup PC, try again.

The player was not successful on its first try. Nor the second, nor the third, nor the fourth.

Another player wondered if the dice were cursed. His picked them up and rolled: 3 sixes and a five.

Back then, for that campaign we had it that if you wanted to RP a certain class/race, you had to roll until you made the mins. We already did one where you roll the dice then pick a class your rolls allow you to RP.

I think it was his ninth try he finally got the numbers he needed to make the mins.

Why not just give him the mins?

I found that by having him ROLL his stats, he was more invested in the PC. And his RP'ing afterwards showed that as well. He wanted this PC to survive and grow. He put so much into the PC since we from the start made it that difficult.

He was one of the first and only players that created a portrait of his PC. He then also took the results of my generic back ground generator, and used those results to write a short story out of it.

He said it was his best PC and enjoyed every moment of it.
 

dnd4vr

Keeper of the Seven Keys
Ok, this was early on in our game.... We were infiltrating an orc stronghold/cave complex. Things were going well until--of course-the **** hit the fan!

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A couple orcs escaped us. Two character pursued as others were engaged in combat. The next round the others also gave chase, only to find we walked into a trap! One of the two who ran ahead was already down, the other badly injured. We moved in to try to rescue them, but then from hidden passages others cut off our retreat. We were surrounded and it was looking like a TPK.

The fights raged on for many rounds, one by one the PCs continued to drop. The few that stood fought their way back to the entrance, but the cost was heavy. Guarding their rear, allowing their flight to succeed, was a single dwarf...

A lone dwarf in plate armor and shield, wielding his trusty warhammer, was the last one standing against the tide. Literally a dozen orcs moved in on him. Round by round, minute by minute, he crushed one and then another, taking each blow with a resolve born from deep within his mountain home.

He shrugged off the blows as he armor and shield were beaten, dented, and smashed. He suddenly grew to twice his size! His Duergar magic was his last hope as his strength and life was waning. His mastery of his armor and shield proved his only lifeline as his friends continued their fight on the other front.

Each time one of the orcs swung, it got harder and eventually he knew he would not survive--he would die and so would his friends. He gasped for hope and air in the stagnant darkness of the orc-infested caverns, finding both. His strength slightly bolstered, he fought on bravely!

The orcs began to despair as their numbers dwindled. His hope grew more and more as each foe fell. The last that faced him dropped below the weight of his mighty hammer. Bloodied, aching, and war-torn, the dwarf stood glaring at the single orc that had retreated before he could kill him.

In his stunted common the mongrel spoke, "Drop you weapon or I kill you friend!"

Defeated, his shoulders slumped and he dropped his warhammer. The clunk-like sound echoed in the silence of the cave halls. The orc grinned, a broken tooth forcing his lips into a sneer.

"Now you both die," the orc uttered.

Head bowed, the dwarf replied, "Yep, I guess we will..."

This handaxe whirled through the air, slicing the darkness with its razor's edge, and struck deeply into the orc's chest. Its eyes opened wide in shock as its legs lost all feeling, and it collapsed into the blood-soaked earthen floor.

"But you'll die first."

Gathering his weapons, the dwarf slowly trudged to the entrance, to find his friends had cleared the way out and cheered when he walked into the summer sunlight. They had thought he had died to cover their escape, but seeing him step out from the tunnels was like watching him being born again.

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The DM took the one player aside to play it out while the rest of us sat back and watched. It looked bleak at many times, but Heavy Armor mastery saved the dwarf's life. The battle, literally, took over three hours to play out, over 30 ROUNDS of combat, and the dwarf had killed over 20 orcs in battle by himself, and he had only 3 hit points left.

I've rarely seen anything like it. I have one other story to share, about love and sacrifice, but that is for Sunday maybe when I have more time. :)
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I found that by having him ROLL his stats, he was more invested in the PC. And his RP'ing afterwards showed that as well. He wanted this PC to survive and grow. He put so much into the PC since we from the start made it that difficult.

He was one of the first and only players that created a portrait of his PC. He then also took the results of my generic back ground generator, and used those results to write a short story out of it.

He said it was his best PC and enjoyed every moment of it.
I think that enjoyment is undervalued during character creation. The Internet has all kinds of advice on how to optimize your character, which races subclasses to choose, what combinations of feats and subclasses and spells to go with, etc., but none of these "optimized build" websites has any advice on how to make a character fun to play, for you. Sometimes you just gotta let numbers be numbers, and let characters be characters.
 
So, some years back, I joined a local open table. I had a lot of fun, but soon there were more players than could be easily managed at the table. With no one else stepping forward, I volunteered to start a second table (which is still going to this day).

Come that holiday season, my new table of players gave me a gift as thanks, with the following card:

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