D&D 5E The popularity of horror adventures/settings for 5e

Mixture is possible, for example the movies of Resident Evil could be action horror. Castlevania anime could be dark fantasy. The movies of Blade the vampire-hunter would be urban dark fantasy. Buffy the vampire slayer would be horror+comedy. Ash in Evil Dead + Army of Darkness is horror with touchs of comedy.

When the players get older then the "pokemon" enemies become "boring", like the teenage who wants to listen different musical styles, or a different clothing style.

Ordinary "D&D monsters" could be really dreadful in the hands of the right creator, for example a group of ordinary peasants who have to survive the raids of gnolls.

And players would rather to face, not enemy more powerfuls, but whose concept is dreadful.
 

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Robin F

Villager
One reason I like horror in TTRPGs is that I get to experience the horror atmosphere, but it never gets truly scary like in horror movies. I can't stand those. So it's like this space where I can experience horror tropes while not getting scared shitless.
 

There are no rules in the DMG for turning a combat encounter into a chase, so the chase rules only work if they decide not to fight before they know whether or not the enemy is actually a serious threat to them. That's not remotely helpful.
I just looked at the DMG and it seems pretty straight forward to me how to transition from combat to a chase. One group flees (becoming the quarry) and the other chases (becoming the pursuer). What else do you need?
 
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There are no rules in the DMG for turning a combat encounter into a chase, so the chase rules only work if they decide not to fight before they know whether or not the enemy is actually a serious threat to them. That's not remotely helpful.
It's not so hard.

Players: We run away!
DM: Ok, we'll switch to the chase rules.

(The real problem is that the chase rules are less than great, but at least they exist)
 

GrimCo

Adventurer
Level 5 party creeps to the house. They slowly open the door. Inside, they see vampire chomping on farmers wife and pale bloodless corpse of farmer. Players: Ooo, naughty word! That's a vampire.
DM: Vampire stops feeding and turns to the door alarmed by the sound of creecking. His piercing blood red eyes stare at you.
Players: We're getting hell out of here, on the double. They shut the door and start runing
DM: As you start runing, you hear laugh and words from the house : Run away sweet morsels, we'll meet again some other night. Muahahahahah!

You don't need to start combat to know if the creature is threat or not. Also, creatures, especially intelligent creatures, won't attack on sight if they aren't feeling threatened or if players aren't much of nuisance to them.
 

Rystefn

Explorer
I just looked at the DMG and it seems pretty straight forward to me how to transition from combat to a chase. One group flees (becoming a the quarry) and the other chases (becoming the pursuer). What else do you need?
It's not so hard.

Players: We run away!
DM: Ok, we'll switch to the chase rules.

(The real problem is that the chase rules are less than great, but at least they exist)
It's fascinating to me how often people point to the DMG's chase rules when it's painfully obvious that they've never used them, or even thought very much about how it might go down if they tried. What you're saying might work out just fine if you were playing with side initiative and both teams lined up across from each other like a Final Fantasy game. But that's not 5e. So at what point in the round are you allowed to do this conversion from combat to chase? Any time you like? Can you take all the PC turns attacking, then flee before the enemy gets a turn? Do you get to Dash away, then call for retreat and get to start with a free extra 60ft head start? If you're completely surrounded, can you still declare a flee action and teleport through enemy spaces? If you're mostly surrounded, can you declare a flee action to avoid taking half a dozen opportunity attacks? Or do you still take the opportunity attacks anyway? If you do, what happens if the opportunity attack has the ability to stop movement, like sentinel feat or a monster attack that grapples on hit? What about Warcaster and Booming Blade? If you declare that you're fleeing, and the enemy pops you with Booming Blade, are you committed to the chase and automatically take the damage, or can you abort it?

Most hilariously, if you start from melee range, then the distance between the pursuer and the quarry is zero. Congratulations, you've now caught the quarry and the chase is over.

Yes, they exist, but they're not just less than great. They're absolute garbage, and whoever wrote them also literally never considered how to transition from a combat to a chase during and actual game. And, on top of all that, they still mostly come down to "whoever has the highest movement rate wins." And I know someone is about to say something about the stealth checks to escape, but you don't get to make those unless you can break line of sight, and you can't break line of sight unless you can create some distance from the pursuer, and you can't create that distance unless you either started with it, or you're faster than whatever is chasing you. Oh look, that's a whole page of rules that says "the rogue can use Cunning action to get away, then Stealth Expertise to hide. Everyone else is either a crap shoot, or has basically zero chance to escape." You know... the same thing you get if you just don't use the chase rules at all.
 

Rystefn

Explorer
Level 5 party creeps to the house. They slowly open the door. Inside, they see vampire chomping on farmers wife and pale bloodless corpse of farmer. Players: Ooo, naughty word! That's a vampire.
DM: Vampire stops feeding and turns to the door alarmed by the sound of creecking. His piercing blood red eyes stare at you.
Players: We're getting hell out of here, on the double. They shut the door and start runing
DM: As you start runing, you hear laugh and words from the house : Run away sweet morsels, we'll meet again some other night. Muahahahahah!

You don't need to start combat to know if the creature is threat or not. Also, creatures, especially intelligent creatures, won't attack on sight if they aren't feeling threatened or if players aren't much of nuisance to them.
Uh huh... that's assuming the players know that the vampire is a CR they can't effectively fight against. I don't think "just metagame around it" is quite the trump card you want it to be here.
 

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
Level 5 party creeps to the house. They slowly open the door. Inside, they see vampire chomping on farmers wife and pale bloodless corpse of farmer. Players: Ooo, naughty word! That's a vampire.
DM: Vampire stops feeding and turns to the door alarmed by the sound of creecking. His piercing blood red eyes stare at you.
Players: We're getting hell out of here, on the double. They shut the door and start runing

Level 5 party creeps to the house. They slowly open the door. Inside, they see the pale bloodless corpse of farmer.
Players: we cautiously go in to investigate the corpse
DM: Something moves above you, the corpse of the farmers wife drops and you see the Vampires blood red eyes as it dives towards you (surprise)
Players: oh no! We're getting hell out of here, on the double.
Disengage and dash
DM: the Vampire Dashes after you - you’re still in melee range
 
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