D&D 5E What are the highlights of D&D 5th edition for you?


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Argyle King

Legend
Yet the point remains, Backgrounds are not being removed from the game, and that was never discussed or hinted at.

I've addressed that previously, so I would prefer to not derail the thread.

Suffice to say that the new version is not the same thing and does not function the same way.

If 5.5 were to start using 3d6 as a resolution system but refer to those 3d6 as still being a d20, that would not make it so and there would be differences in function - even if a similar range of results could be theoretically possible.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I've addressed that previously, so I would prefer to not derail the thread.

Suffice to say that the new version is not the same thing and does not function the same way.

If 5.5 were to start using 3d6 as a resolution system but refer to those 3d6 as still being a d20, that would not make it so and there would be differences in function - even if a similar range of results could be theoretically possible.
But, it does fun tion the same way...?

It's more like saying "yeah, I like Subclass, too bad they are getting rid of it in the new rules"
 

Argyle King

Legend
I like that 5E (at least for a little while) embraced the idea of community and getting together with a group of friends.

Digital Tools are cool.
Virtual Tabletops are something I'm thankful to have to keep in touch with friends who are long distance.

But, for me, one of my favorite parts of D&D has always been community and sitting at a table with friends (especially post Covid and especially in a real-world that has become increasingly attached to staring at digital screens).

Early 5E did a good job of capturing the essence of community and rejuvenating the excitement of getting together with a group. I gained good friends from the the playtest sessions.
 

Chalice

Explorer
Advantage/disadvantage, backgrounds, one save per ability, somewhat less gonzo high level casters (than 3e, which was my previous played version of D&D).
 
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BookTenTiger

He / Him
Something I've come to really appreciate after many years of playing is the split of Actions, Bonus Actions, and Reactions.

At first I was really thrown off by the idea of certain classes not necessarily having a bonus action or reaction each round, while others really rely on them. But over time I've seen it as a really elegant design that makes playing different classes actually feel different.

4e was pretty revolutionary in strictly defining actions as Standard, Move, and Minor. It really felt great each round to have three things to do. And when I first shifted to 5e I was really confused about there being things called Bonus Actions and Reactions, but not necessarily having anything to fill those slots.

But now, in reflection, I really like it.

For a multi-year campaign I played as a Divination wizard focusing on non-lethal spells. I pretty much never used a Bonus Action or Reaction. But my spells had big effects in and out of combat.

On the other hand, my friend played a Rogue Thief and he used Actions, Bonus Actions, and Reactions every turn. It allowed him to do some fun, crazy stuff.

I like the fact that our play experiences were different because the classes we chose used Actions differently.
 

Clint_L

Legend
Backgrounds are still in the game, they have significantly more pages dedicated to them, each has its own art, and they serve the same purpose. Anyone using the book will have no problem understanding them or thinking of ways to link them to their character's story arc.

Sheesh.
 

JEB

Legend
Backgrounds are still in the game,
Sure.

they have significantly more pages dedicated to them,
Not according to the preview screenshots @Parmandur showed. They take up a few pages in 2014 5e, and only part of a page each in the 2024 previews. They're also down to basically a paragraph of flavor text.

each has its own art,
They already had their own art.

and they serve the same purpose.
Purpose, perhaps, but they provide a lot fewer tools to achieve that purpose. (And that's if you don't regard them as largely becoming a lore justification for a starting feat.)
 

Micah Sweet

Level Up & OSR Enthusiast
Sure.


Not according to the preview screenshots @Parmandur showed. They take up a few pages in 2014 5e, and only part of a page each in the 2024 previews. They're also down to basically a paragraph of flavor text.


They already had their own art.


Purpose, perhaps, but they provide a lot fewer tools to achieve that purpose. (And that's if you don't regard them as largely becoming a lore justification for a starting feat.)
My main interest in 5.5e is seeing what the biggest RPG company wants us to think D&D is like.
 

1. I first played D&D at the tail end of 1E. 5E is the most accessible version of the rules I encountered. Yet it still retained enough complexity to get the character optimization part of my brain going.

2. The light domain cleric. That was MY class in the PHB. As soon as I started playing one I loved it. I've played the class four times with everything from a serene cleric of Lathander to a fire and brimstone cleric of Kossuth whose catch phrase was "you will be purified!"

3. Eldritch blast (and agonizing blast). This quickly became my favorite cantrip of all time.

4. As others have said, seeing D&D reach a level of mainstream popularity I never thought possible. The game benefited from being released at a time when fantasy had become much more mainstream successful (Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, etc.)

5. Advantage and Disadvantage is an elegant mechanic.

6. Utility magic. From misty step to tiny hut to pass without trace 5E fired up my mind thinking about how spells could be used to overcome problems.
 

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