log in or register to remove this ad

 

What are you reading this year 2020?

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
After all these years I've finally gotten around to reading Master & Commander (at least the 1st book of the series).
Right now I'm somewhere in Chapter 3 & it's looking to be a long slow read....
He is very detailed and historical, and the plotting is slow, but he somehow still managed to keep me interested. I've read the entire series, even the unfinished final book. I enjoyed them.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Still reading Terry Pratchett's Snuff.

Still reading William Tecumseh Sherman: In Service of My Country by James Lee McDonough.

Still reading Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.

Still reading Don't Burn This Book by Dave Rubin.
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
Finished Dread Companion by Norton, and The Good Soldier Schweik by Hasek, now starting Miners in the Sky by Murray Leinster: "Savage explorers of forgotten moons battle for treasure in the lawless rings of outer space."
 

I avoided Stephen King for decades. All because the biggest fan of Stephen King I knew was also someone that, while reading, would idly tear off the corners of the pages and eat them. For the longest time, I just couldn't get that image out of my head to read any Stephen King.

The early (first 3?) short stories collections are amazing. I'm still waiting for an adaptation of "Mrs Todd's Shortcut", and while I haven't read "Ladyfingers" for 30 years, it regularly creeps me the heck out. I've read very few of his newer books, but all of his earlier stuff when I was younger.
 


Nellisir

Adventurer
I avoided Stephen King for decades. All because the biggest fan of Stephen King I knew was also someone that, while reading, would idly tear off the corners of the pages and eat them. For the longest time, I just couldn't get that image out of my head to read any Stephen King.
lady fingers they taste just like lady fingers

(Read Skeleton Crew. And the story is "Survivor Type", not "Ladyfingers. My error. And...apologies in advance if you can't ever sleep again. Apparently that story even bothers Stephen King....)
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Just read War Dogs by Greg Bear. Pretty good. Doesn't break any new ground. Maybe 6/10?
Edit: Apparently I forgot to note I finished Artemis. I liked it a lot. 8/10

War Dogs is set (mostly) on Mars. Before War Dogs I read Artemis (set on the Moon), by Andy Weir, who wrote The Martian. War Dogs has a character named Alice. I also have a book to read called Sister Alice, by Robert Reed, who wrote Marrow (about what's inside a fake world/spaceship), and I have another book, Century Rain, by Alastair Reynolds about a link to another world inside a ruined Earth. And, cycling back to Artemis, the main character is an Arabic woman grifter/smuggler with shady connections who gets in trouble and has to hide from the bad guys, and the main character in Alif the Unseen is apparently an Arabic hacker who gets in trouble and has to hide from the bad guys. (This is all back-cover stuff, people, no spoilers.) Given that I pick what I read, it's not surprising there are similarities; I'm just feeling them resonate right now.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Reading Way Station by Clifford Simak. It was published in 1963, and amazingly has almost no racism or sexism in it, at least so far. I'm enjoying the story, although it has a similar

wherein the protagonist becomes the sole representative of Earth and Humanity in the face of a spanning galactic civilization. In Heinlein's Have Spacesuit will Travel, I didn't find the protagonist's argument particularly convincing, personally and overall thought the plot resolution weak.

We'll see if Way Station suffers from the same. I'm hoping not.

 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
Reading "The Stars Are Ours!" by Norton. I should read the short story collections by King again, such as Night Shift or Skeleton Crew.
 

I finished the urban fantasy novel I'd been reading and picked up another one by a different author but it looks like it's got another "sexy good vampire love interest" so I'll put that one on hold for awhile. So instead, I started the first of three novels (I'll bet there are more) by Deborah Blake in her "Baba Yaga" series. This one is called "Wickedly Dangerous," and in it Baba Yaga isn't just an individual, it's a title. Baba Yagas are women who deal with the weird stuff; the main character in this novel goes by Barbara "Baba" Yager, lives in an extradimensional Slipstream trailer, and has a large white mastiff who's really a shapechanged dragon in charge of the Water of Life and Death (which grants Baba Yagas their longevity; Barbara's apparently 81 years old or something despite looking like she's in her 30s). The plot involves a search for some missing children, in which she's helping to the local Sheriff in the small New York county where the kids went missing. I'm hoping it's good, because I've got Wickedly Wonderful and Wickedly Powerful lined up behind this one, in my waiting-to-be-read pile, each featuring a different Baba Yaga. (I got them for 50 cents each at a library book sale some months back - a small investment on my part.) But so far, so good; I'm several chapters in and the characters are interesting, the worldbuilding's intriguing, and I'm eager to see what happens next. What more can you ask for in a fiction novel?

Johnathan
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
Jim Butcher's Peace Talks came. I reread the preceding book, Skin Game, which I enjoyed - I remember when I first read it that I felt it was a pulling back of the sphere of important of what Harry was doing compared to the book before and had some reservations, but when I read it by itself just now I enjoyed it.

Anyway, I then read Peace Talks. I won't post any spoilers except to say that I am expectantly waiting for the next book, which I believe is this November. And I have a guess about why it was delayed so long.

After that I read some short stories in the collection The Ogre's Wife. The author has "fable" down pat as a story type - and I find that I'm not into fables. It's not that they are bad, short stories aren't my thing to start with, and this format isn't for me. It's not the stories in the book.

(Yes, I just did a "It's not you, it's me" for a book.)
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I finished the urban fantasy novel I'd been reading and picked up another one by a different author but it looks like it's got another "sexy good vampire love interest" so I'll put that one on hold for awhile. So instead, I started the first of three novels (I'll bet there are more) by Deborah Blake in her "Baba Yaga" series. This one is called "Wickedly Dangerous," and in it Baba Yaga isn't just an individual, it's a title. Baba Yagas are women who deal with the weird stuff; the main character in this novel goes by Barbara "Baba" Yager, lives in an extradimensional Slipstream trailer, and has a large white mastiff who's really a shapechanged dragon in charge of the Water of Life and Death (which grants Baba Yagas their longevity; Barbara's apparently 81 years old or something despite looking like she's in her 30s). The plot involves a search for some missing children, in which she's helping to the local Sheriff in the small New York county where the kids went missing. I'm hoping it's good, because I've got Wickedly Wonderful and Wickedly Powerful lined up behind this one, in my waiting-to-be-read pile, each featuring a different Baba Yaga. (I got them for 50 cents each at a library book sale some months back - a small investment on my part.) But so far, so good; I'm several chapters in and the characters are interesting, the worldbuilding's intriguing, and I'm eager to see what happens next. What more can you ask for in a fiction novel?

Johnathan
That sounds awesome. I just read all the novel descriptions on GoodReads, and Barbara Yager returns in Book 4 (as do the other 2 BY's from books 2 and 3). Need to get an income stream that gives me 8 hours a day to read books that I want to read...
 

trappedslider

Adventurer
Anyway, I then read Peace Talks. I won't post any spoilers except to say that I am expectantly waiting for the next book, which I believe is this November. And I have a guess about why it was delayed so long.
September 26th,and the initial draft of Peace Talks turned into a David Eddings level Doorstopper. The publisher gently suggested to Butcher that perhaps it would be better served as a two-part story. Butcher split up the character developments, came up with a second Action Plot and re-wrote both parts into the final Peace Talks and Battle Ground.

The other reasons behind the gap between Peace Talks and Skin Game were Jim had gotten divorced, his dog had died, he'd remarried and moved to another state but then got stuck living in a crappy apartment with no writing space for years while an even crappier contractor failed to build him a house.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Finished Gypsy in Amber/Canto For A Gypsy, by Martin Cruz Smith. They're early books by him (1971/1972 respectively), but still really enjoyable/good reads. (And yes, he deals with the gypsy stuff respectfully and, insofar as I can tell, well.) I really like his stuff.

Probably Sister Alice, by Robert Reed, next.
 

carrot

Explorer
Anyway, I then read Peace Talks. I won't post any spoilers except to say that I am expectantly waiting for the next book
Me too :)
It was nice to get a Dresden fix. I'm glad its not too a long wait for the next one though.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Was going to take a break from novels for a bit and read some game books (hello Eberron HC!) and graphic novels. But then some books I had reserved at the library came in so...
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
September 26th,and the initial draft of Peace Talks turned into a David Eddings level Doorstopper. The publisher gently suggested to Butcher that perhaps it would be better served as a two-part story. Butcher split up the character developments, came up with a second Action Plot and re-wrote both parts into the final Peace Talks and Battle Ground.

The other reasons behind the gap between Peace Talks and Skin Game were Jim had gotten divorced, his dog had died, he'd remarried and moved to another state but then got stuck living in a crappy apartment with no writing space for years while an even crappier contractor failed to build him a house.
That was my guess - that it ended up getting split.

I had heard some of his trials and tribulations but not all of them. That sucks. Thanks for the info.
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Finished Terry Pratchett's Snuff. Have to wait for payday (Friday) to get Raising Steam.

Finished William Tecumseh Sherman: In Service of My Country by James Lee McDonough.

Still reading Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.

Finished Don't Burn This Book by Dave Rubin.

Starting The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe by Heather MacDonald.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Read several graphic novels this weekend.

Invisible Kingdom Vol 2 by G. Willow Wilson and art by Christian Ward

Ether Vol 3 the Disappearance of Violet Bell by Matt Kindt and David Rubín

Usagi Yojimbo Bunraku and other stories by Stan Sakai

Listed above in the order I enjoyed them from least enjoyable to most.

Just started:
An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon
Glass Houses by Louise Penny
Mouse Guard RPG by David Peterson and and Luke Crane
 

I finished Weis and Krammes Spymaster. A quite enjoyable read, and a world apart from Dragonlance, with its Golden Age of Piracy meets Dragons meets magic meets airships. There's a lot going on, but it all flows together pretty seamlessly. Will definitely be following up on this series.

Next up is back to something older, with Gardner Fox's Kyrik: Warlock Warrior.
 

NOW LIVE! 5 Plug-In Settlements for your 5E Game

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top