log in or register to remove this ad

 

What are you reading this year 2020?

Finished my re-read of Zelazny's Jack of Shadows. As I've read more Zelazny since then (though still only having scratched the surface), this one still remains my favorite of his works.

Now I'm finally getting to Novalyne Price Ellis' One Who Walked Alone, about her time with Robert E. Howard. I saw the movie adaptation (The Whole Wide World) a while ago and have been meaning to read this ever since.
 

log in or register to remove this ad



Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I just got Early Riser by Jasper Fforde, and all of my other readings are cancelled until I get through this one. :) I love me some Fforde.
I tried reading the first book of his... whatever the series is - ah yes, the Thursday Next series. You would think it was right up my alley - SF/Fantasy, Mystery, and English lit references dropped like chicken poop all over the coop (as an English Lit major, that should be my bang). With a tone that reminded me of Sir Terry Pratchett (who I loved for the first 20 novels or so).

But for some reason it was a bit too much "wink wink nudge nudge" for me. I don't think I finished the first book.

And yet...

Maybe there's another series I can start with to ease my way into his oeuvre?
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
I think Thursday Next The Eyre Affair was his first; he might have softened or refined his technique later...but to be honest, he deals with absurdity by adding more and more. "Thursday Next" is the series, and protagonist. There's just a high degree of ridiculousness to deal with. I was actually just thinking that he doesn't really deal in fantasy worlds, or our world with secret oddities - he deals with outright alternate worlds, where England is a subsidiary of Manchester Chocolates & Upholstery Inc, thanks to an unusually good year in upholstery in 1953 and a really bad bet on the Prime Minister's part involving a chicken, two dice, and the contents of a 14thC. soup tureen that had been unearthed in the car park.

Just to give a fictitious example.

Shades of Grey is really good and less absurd, but part one of a trilogy that hasn't seen a part two in a decade plus.

Maybe the two Nursery Crime Division books?
 

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
I've been actively seeking out fantasy and science fiction from non-white-dude authors, with a focus on fantasy that doesn't use European history as it's touchstone.

I started on a few that didn't grab me. Sisters of the Deep Black by Lina Rather wasn't rivetting, but was really interesting, and a quick read. I just started on Children of Blood and Bone by Toni Adayemi. I like the way it's written and it seem promising.

Next on the to-try pile is The Dragon Republic, by R.F. Kuang

Oh, and I read the pretty massive graphic novel Grass by Keum-Suk Gendry-Kim and it was very, very good.

Also: am assortment of Bronze Age comics that I find in my collection, and semi-random comics on Hoopla.

Try Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys. It's based in West Indian/Caribbean and West African story traditions.
 


Gah! I finished A Time to Love - the novel, at least, if not the story: that's continued in A Time to Hate by the same author! This one didn't even have a proper ending, it just cut off with a "to be continued" in mid-story. And it's not even like the story was that interesting in the first place, definitely not interesting enough for me to hunt down the rest of the tale contained in the sequel. Total, massive fail!

I think I'm going to go reread some Jack Vance short stories to cool down from this fiasco. Thanks for nothing, Robert Greenberger! You've earned yourself a place on my "never read anything else by this author" list.

Johnathan
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Reread Glen Cook's "A Cruel Wind" omnibus. Contains 3 of the 8 Dread Empire books - A Shadow of All Night Falling, October's Baby, All Darkness Met. In some places they almost read like sketch of novel, but they have some nice world building. Taking a break for some Appendix N reading, and then will jump back into the prequels.
 
Last edited:

KahlessNestor

Adventurer
Reading Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett.

Finished reading Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.

Still reading How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps by Ben Shapiro.

Still reading the Star Wars Adventures core rule book.

Still reading Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson.

Starting to read The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang.
 



Nellisir

Adventurer
Just finished 2020 Hugo Award winner A Memory of Empire. Would recommend.
I think that's on my list to get. I'll prioritize it.

I just finished Early Riser, by Jasper Fforde. Good, enjoyable, but not as...(dynamic?) as some others. I don't think alternative worlds is really what he dabbles in, more like...nonsense worlds. In Early Riser people hibernate. The world is largely glaciated. Wales is a vacation destination on the Albion Penninsula. You can take a day excursion to a mammoth farm and milk a mammoth. Tom Jones exists, and Rawhide, and Canada.

It's a little hard to pigeonhole, actually. Not a comedy. Mostly mystery?
 



Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Inspired by

Shorter Appendix N

I ordered and finished Three Hearts and Three Lions. I thought it was better executed (or maybe just more serious) than De Camp and Pratt's Harold Shea, and I can see where it influenced D&D. In spite of my love of 6/7ths of Narnia, and one-time really liking Thomas Covenant, I apparently have more trouble getting in to Crossworlds Fantasy than the just in that one world kind.
 


I like the breezy tone of Harold Shea, but Three Hearts and Three Lions is absolutely one of the key texts of Appendix N. And I don't think anyone would disagree with the statement that Anderson was the better author than De Camp and Pratt.

I ordered and finished Three Hearts and Three Lions. I thought it was better executed (or maybe just more serious) than De Camp and Pratt's Harold Shea, and I can see where it influenced D&D. In spite of my love of 6/7ths of Narnia, and one-time really liking Thomas Covenant, I apparently have more trouble getting in to Crossworlds Fantasy than the just in that one world kind.

I finished reading One Who Walked Alone. An absolute must for any fans of R.E. Howard. It's a fascinating view into who he was, but Novalyne Price is also pretty interesting. Driven, opinionated, with strong views on equality.

Next up, what else could I read but some R.E. Howard. It's Conan the Usurper. With the aforementioned De Camp.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
I ordered and finished Three Hearts and Three Lions. I thought it was better executed (or maybe just more serious) than De Camp and Pratt's Harold Shea, and I can see where it influenced D&D. In spite of my love of 6/7ths of Narnia, and one-time really liking Thomas Covenant, I apparently have more trouble getting in to Crossworlds Fantasy than the just in that one world kind.

Try The Broken Sword too, also by Anderson. I read both earlier this year.

 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Finished rereading Glen Cook's Dread Empire prequels, The Fire in HIs Hands and WIth Mercy Towards None. Reading the three books in the main sequence and the prequls back to back shows how much his writing imporved from 79 to 85. The Fire in His Hands is particularly well done.

Storm Bringer/Stealer of Souls hasn't arrived yet, so I'm starting the next Dread Empire book instead.
 
Last edited:

Halloween Horror For 5E

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top