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What are your unpopular geek opinions?

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Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
I don't think The Big Lebowski is a good movie. And I say this as a guy whose favorite drink is a white Russian, who hates the Eagles, and wears a bathrobe every day (since COVID at least lol)*

Terry Brooks is probably my favorite author

Not a big fan of Studio Ghibli. Some of the movies are alright I guess, I'm just not a huge fan

Windows over Mac

Jack Vance had just as much influence on D&D as Tolkien, only way more people are familiar with Tolkien than Vance

The current popular topic, Don't Look Up, is a bad movie. Yeah, I get how it's supposed to be hammering home how the culture in the US turns its nose at scientists and experts while leaders ignore deadly scenarios for ratings. I got that in the first 5 minutes. I didn't need it browbeated into me for the next 2 and a half hours. It was more depressing than funny.


*as an anecdote, it took me 5 years before I even saw that movie after it came out, and wondered why my fiends kept calling me "the dude".
 

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Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I don't think The Big Lebowski is a good movie. And I say this as a guy whose favorite drink is a white Russian, who hates the Eagles, and wears a bathrobe every day (since COVID at least lol)*

This brings up an interesting question- does this actually constitute an unpopular geek opinion?

I recently lost an Iron DM round in part because I suck, and in part because the adventure I designed was a loving homage to the Coen Brothers and Blood Simple (and other films) which the judge did not recognize.

So what constitutes geek culture now? Star Wars and Star Trek and superhero stuff, for sure. But do the Coen Brothers count? Wes Anderson movies? P. T. Anderson?

Is there even a line?
 

payn

Legend
This brings up an interesting question- does this actually constitute an unpopular geek opinion?

I recently lost an Iron DM round in part because I suck, and in part because the adventure I designed was a loving homage to the Coen Brothers and Blood Simple (and other films) which the judge did not recognize.

So what constitutes geek culture now? Star Wars and Star Trek and superhero stuff, for sure. But do the Coen Brothers count? Wes Anderson movies? P. T. Anderson?

Is there even a line?
Geeks culture can cover any subject.

What is the difference between geek and nerd?



Image result for geek
A Nerd is someone who is passionate about learning/being smart/academia. A Geek is someone who is passionate about some particular area or subject, often an obscure or difficult one.

It just seems concentrated on a few subjects here at ENworld because its a particular geek culture site.
 

Terry Pratchett is overrated.

Starship Troopers was a great movie.

Super Nintendo is overrated, both when it was new and by retro game enthusiasts.

The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest is the best incarnation of Jonny Quest.

New York style pizza is a miserable acceptance of mediocrity.

EMCCD cameras will always have niche applications where they with outperform sCMOS sensors.

The Jedi were the bad guys of the Star Wars galaxy. The Rebels were terrorists.

The live action Speed Racer is a great movie, possibly the best live action remake of a cartoon ever made. Masters of the Universe also fits into this category.
 
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Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Geeks culture can cover any subject.
…. A Geek is someone who is passionate about some particular area or subject, often an obscure or difficult one.
.

It’s an idea, but I think it’s … retconning popular usage.

People can be obsessed about particular areas and. It be geeks. For example, someone obsessed about improving their acting is rarely called an acting geek (but someone interested in film studies might be called a film geek). A person who obsessed over the Kardashians is rarely said to be part of geek culture.

It tends to have a much more specific connotation, IMO.
 

MarkB

Legend
The current popular topic, Don't Look Up, is a bad movie. Yeah, I get how it's supposed to be hammering home how the culture in the US turns its nose at scientists and experts while leaders ignore deadly scenarios for ratings. I got that in the first 5 minutes. I didn't need it browbeated into me for the next 2 and a half hours. It was more depressing than funny.
That's a relief. I bailed on that movie after about 5-10 minutes (the White House scene) because it was far more depressing than amusing to me. Glad to know I wasn't missing anything.
 

payn

Legend
It’s an idea, but I think it’s … retconning popular usage.

People can be obsessed about particular areas and. It be geeks. For example, someone obsessed about improving their acting is rarely called an acting geek (but someone interested in film studies might be called a film geek). A person who obsessed over the Kardashians is rarely said to be part of geek culture.

It tends to have a much more specific connotation, IMO.
Im not following. I have always heard people use geek as an obsessed and intelligent pursuit. Also, heard it used as a pejorative but I think thats mostly in the past. I've not heard it used as an actual mass culture until here and now. Typically, nerd gets used in a pop culture sense. Nerd is encompassing, but geek is particular. IME.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
The Jedi were the bad guys of the Star Wars galaxy. The Rebels were terrorists.
This is really the only one I object to, especially the second part. I have a hard time believing that any decent person can watch the OT and see the Rebel Alliance as terrorists.

Fighting against an oppressive totalitarian regime isn’t terrorism.
 


This is really the only one I object to, especially the second part. I have a hard time believing that any decent person can watch the OT and see the Rebel Alliance as terrorists.

Fighting against an oppressive totalitarian regime isn’t terrorism.

There is zero on screen evidence in the original Star Wars trilogy that the Empire is an oppressive totalitarian regime.

The entire plot of prequel trilogy is based on the fact the Jedi and the Old Republic are a corrupt theocracy.
 

payn

Legend
This is really the only one I object to, especially the second part. I have a hard time believing that any decent person can watch the OT and see the Rebel Alliance as terrorists.

Fighting against an oppressive totalitarian regime isn’t terrorism.
An interesting take in a sort of terrorism against a oppressive totalitarian regime isn't terrorism way.
 



Cadence

Legend
Supporter
There is zero on screen evidence in the original Star Wars trilogy that the Empire is an oppressive totalitarian regime.

The entire plot of prequel trilogy is based on the fact the Jedi and the Old Republic are a corrupt theocracy.
And so it's ok to blow up entire planets as part of a torture session...

Edit: Ninja'd by @MarkB
 

You mean, aside from that time they dissolved the elected portion of their government and then blew up a planet?
It was established in the prequels that the senate was an illegitimate and ineffective form of government.

Alderaan was a military target. Literally every single on screen character shown from that planet is a militant terrorist. Tragic, yes, but no more oppressive or totalitarian than any other time one warring faction has destroyed the capital of their enemy.
 
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Geeks-vs-Nerds-vs-Dorks.jpg
 



Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Jack Kirby wasn't a particularly strong penciller (as opposed to layout and idea person) in the 60s and later.
 

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