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D&D 5E What exactly is Feywild in your campaigns?

The Dreaming is a verdant, shifting mirror of the real world, which the fey call the Waking. Terrain and buildings and even cultural trends often match those in the real world, but beings native to there follow their own odd logic. Both time and distance seem to conspire for the sake of dramatic events rather than empirical truth. Depending on a traveler’s mood or their interactions with fey they meet along the way, the same journey on two different occasions might take a different number of days, perhaps with the sun stubbornly hanging in the same spot of the sky for an interminable time, or with the road impossibly bypassing difficult terrain.

Each country in the Waking is matched by an analogue in the Dreaming that reflects the beliefs of the inhabitants.
 

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AcererakTriple6

Autistic DM (he/him)
Your comment here has reminded me how I had the feywild/shadowfel transition, it was to do with it's relation to the positive and negative planes. The plane itself orbited around the prime, as it rose (and approached the positive energy plane/font of life) it transitioned into the Feywild. As it fell (and approached the negative energy plane/Entropy/The end of all life) it transitioned into the shadowfel. I recall having a planar set up where in the celestial planes above energy flowed outwards providing life to all the multiverse, celestials being the closest to this life giving energy. The energy then flowed down through the planes, passing through the elemental and prime planes (essentially on the same level but with the prime nested within the elemental planes) and then downwards to entropy. The lower planes were closest to entropy and the fiends there could draw upon its power.

No idea where I had this setting write up, I often come up with ideas and then completely forget where I left them but it doesn't seem to be in my google drive or onedrive. Might not have had much more than a planar layout.
That's pretty cool. So the "Feywild" and "Shadowfell" were more like seasons on the same plane of existence? That's interesting. I may have to take inspiration from this sometime in the future. I wonder what "Fall" (the Feywild transitioning to the Shadowfell, which actually fits well for the name Shadowfell) and "Spring" (Shadowfell transitioning to Feywild) would be like in that kind of world. It's an interesting concept. Thanks for sharing that!
 


I'll elaborate a bit on my take on the feywild. Within the feywild is an area known as the Path, or the Druid's Path. This is a route through the forest that only druids know, leading to their secret grove. Various druid circles each have their own grove somewhere within the feywild, and most only visit there to appear somewhere else (travel through plants), or to meet with other members of their circle. Few ever venture further into the feywild, for it is a dangerous and sacred place where humans are usually not welcome.

Those who venture further into the Feywild, can encounter any of the following areas:

forestheart-jpg.137953


The Forest Heart
The Forest Heart is a location deep within the forest known only to some druids, witches and fey. It is a pocket dimension found deep within The Path, and the home of the Lord of the Forest. It resembles a massive clearing under a canopy of leafs, shrouded in a dim blue light. Faint light-blue light leaks through the green roof up above, creating a dancing pattern of light spots on the forest floor. A small lake surrounds an island with a gigantic white tree on it. Surrounding the clearing are mossy stones covered in old crooked trees. A slanted cave lurks to the west, with ghostly whispers emanating from within. A series of waterfalls are just to the east, with another cave clearly visible behind them. Lights dance around the clearing and fairies and other fey-folk can be seen enjoying the peace and protection of the heart. The soft jingle of little bells can be heard occasionally, though the origin of the sound is unknown. Three paths lead towards this grand clearing, with one being shrouded in twilight.

Iridescent Lake
Various small streams lead up to this lake. No fish seem to live in this water, but drinking the water acts like a fountain of youth, although for only a few hours. Surrounding the lake are plants and trees shaped like humans, which are all former druids and witches, who chose to become one with the forest.

The Lord of the Forest
This large white stag is the guardian spirit of the forest. It has huge antlers that seem made of tree branches, and are covered in butterflies. He walks across water without even breaking the surface and glows with a bright white light. He is neutral good and can speak telepathically. When he speaks, he speaks with a male and female voice simultaneously. The Lord of the Forest has a memory that goes back many centuries, as he is the tree and the deer is but his avatar. The Lord of the Forest can see into the past and future, and if he chooses to show himself to you, can be a great source of advise. As he is a friendly being, he will warn mortals of the dangers in this realm.

Fairy Falls
Six waterfalls cascade down mossy rocks into a small pool where fairies bathe. A gentle stream leads the water to the central lake of the clearing. The fairies are nude and vanish when approached by mortals, as they are very shy. But just because you can't see them, does not mean they are gone. A small path leads up towards one of the waterfalls and to another cave. Reaching the cave requires traversing slippery rocks.

The Whispering Cave
Mossy stones lie stacked on top of each other on a slanted slope. Trees grow on top of the stones, their roots twisting their way down to the forest floor. Beneath the rocks a small path leads into a dark and ominous looking cave. Familiar ghostly whispers emanate from within. It is very dark inside the Whispering Cave... too dark to see anything without a light source. The cave leads downward, and the rocky moss covered ground can sometimes be slippery and treacherous.
Deep within the cave is a room with a slab of obsidian in the center. The black obsidian is slightly cracked and semi-transparent. Anyone who steps onto the obsidian will see thin colored lines appear from where they are standing, and stretch to a couple of glowing standing stones. These standing stones are made from obsidian also. They are about half the height of a grown man, and are unevenly spaced out. Some are closer to the center while others are much further away to the back of the cave. Voices emanates from most of the stones and blurry images can be seen inside. These stones can be touched, listened to, or looked at to receive visions. These visions show people connected to you; friends, family, adversaries...

Ancestral Caves
These caves are the remnants of ancient tribes of druids. They are covered in cave paintings showing how the earliest druids took human children to raise them in the wild. It also shows how some druids made the ultimate sacrifice and turned themselves into trees. Bowls and urns are scattered about, containing the remnants of paint. On the ground is a strange spiraling symbol carved into the stone. It seems to have been used for calculating celestial configurations. Stones are placed on very deliberate spots on the symbol, marking the locations of planets and stars.

The Lonely Hut
Above the waterfall is a strange tree with a little hut between its branches. The tree leans over the side of the cliff. There does not seem to be any normal means to climb up to it. The hut is made from woven branches and dried wheat. The hut is home to the Forest Oracle, who is the last remaining druid chosen to watch over the Forest Heart.

Grave
Near the lake is a grave surrounded by white flowers. A stone slab lies on the ground with illegible writing. A stone statue of a lady overgrown with plants stands where a headstone would be. The grave belongs to the previous Forest Oracle, who was slain by enemies of the forest.

Stone Heads
These giant heads seem carved out of large rocks and are covered in moss. Their eyes can move slowly and they can talk. They were carved long ago by the fey that live here, who gave them a face and the ability to talk. The stone heads are friendly towards humans, as they have been among druids for many years. The Stone Heads adore everything that grows around and on top of them. They know much about the surrounding area, as theirs are the memories of ages.

Stone Circle
This circle of large stacked stones resembles stonehenge. There is a small clay bowl on the central stones and many flowers grow around the circle. Into each of the six standing stones a different swirling symbol has been carved, the meaning of which is unclear. The circle radiates magical energy.

Dais
A crumbling stone staircase leads up to a stone dais; a round platform with strange swirling lines carved into it. The dais provides a good overview of the forest clearing. In ancient times this dais could open up, revealing a path into the caverns below the forest. The knowledge to open it however is long lost. Six circles are engraved on the dais, each with a unique symbol also found on the standing stones of the stone circle. Each circle demands a natural element for it to activate.

The Heart Tree
This massive white tree dominates the clearing. Its thick roots cover the small island in the center of the lake, and dive into its water, only to emerge on the other side. They cover the forest floor of the clearing in every direction. In the center of the tree is a large vertical opening; a dark crack that leads further into a system of tunnels inside the tree. Each tunnel leads to another fey realm. The tree’s branches are covered in blue lights from fairies. Inside the tree the sound of a beating heart can be heard, because the tree is literally the beating heart of the forest. The tree has countless tunnels inside of it, all leading to small pocket realms. Navigating the tunnels can be difficult, and it is easy to get lost and end up somewhere you did not intend. But those who know how to navigate its winding tunnels, can travel to other realms of the Feywild.

The Illumine Crown
Deep inside the Heart Tree, a tall shaft leads upward to the top of the tree. Up above is a crown of lights where countless fairies swarm around a large hive. Strange sweet nectar gathers in pools surrounding the hive. Drinking this strange fluid brings a person into a strange trance where they can see the future. Branches can be climbed to reach the very top of the Heart Tree, where you can gaze across an endless forest beneath a pitchblack starless sky.

The Forest of Faces
Surrounding the Heart of the Forest is an endless forest called the Forest of Faces. The trees of this forest are covered in many haunting faces. The trees are sentient and hostile to intruders. Beneath their roots are many smaller hearts of other forests in the world.

The Weaver Domain
A system of webbed tunnels, where Queen Dantomere reigns. This realm connects to the Twilight Vale and the Mirror Realm. The spider queen watches over the Loom of Creation, where her fate spinners build connections to other worlds.

Queen Dantomere
A spider queen who lives inside the Heart Tree. This gigantic spider lives inside a system of tunnels where she is tended to by her spider servants. Queen Dantomere is true neutral, and views life as a matter of eat or be eaten. She has a tendency to use webs and other spider related words in her speech to explain her thoughts. She also speaks much of weaving, shedding, picking and battening. The spider queen is completely ammoral, and does not have a sense of right or wrong, she respects only survival. She and her minions will not be hostile to visitors however, though she talks gleefully that her visitors could be blessed by becoming food for her, and becoming part of the eternal circle of life and death. She even promises them a nice view when they are cocooned in her chamber, if they volunteer to be food. The spider queen can be a powerful ally or enemy, depending on how she is treated, and whether her children are attacked. She maintains the connections between dimensions and knows much about gateways to other worlds.

The Twilight Vale
A creepy looking path leads into the oldest part of the forest. The path is crooked and muddy. Branches and roots seem to constantly be in the way, trying to trip intruders. The air is fetid and sickening. Strange flowers and mushrooms grow here. Ghostly child-like voices can be heard all around; the voices of unseelie fairies. This forest is full of strange looking colorful plants, many of which are very poisonous and/or hostile. This forest is home to evil fey, who can be quite dangerous to human intruders. The Twilight Vale harbors the anger of all forests and fey. Dead leafs rain from the treetops of a forest that is shrouded in permanent twilight. Hundreds of eyes watch from every hole and crevice with malice and hatred. This area connects to the Weaver Domain and Shadow Realm.

The Shadow Realm
The entrance to this realm is a gateway of pure darkness. Strange echoes emanate from within. The realm itself resembles a distorted version of the topside world, where everything looks like shadowy silhouettes. All sound sounds as if it is underwater; dampened and muffled. A shadowy shape watches any visitors with great curiosity. This realm connects to the Twilight Vale. The shadows here are most interested in life outside their realm and would gladly switch places with mortal visitors.

The Lord of Shadows
This shadowy figure assumes the silhouette and voice of someone you are familiar with, and who has visited the shadow realm before. He has all of that persons knowledge and memories, but none of their emotions and feelings. The shadow figure cares about his host body, the one who walks the world of light, and knows that his host cares about his friends. Therefor, he understands that his host would like for him to assist those who are dear to his host, depite not sharing any such feelings himself. When people traverse the shadow realm, a shadow takes their place in the world of light. There for he is one of many. Time moves slower in the shadow realm, allowing a person with a physical body to seemingly jump instantly from one place to another.

The Mirror Dimension
The entrance to this realm is a massive mirror that stands at the end of a tunnel, supported by a wooden frame with carved wooden legs that can move. Above the mirror is a wooden face shaped like a lion, that roars in the distance. The mirror itself casts a purple light into the tunnel and its surface is made of a purple crystal.

Beyond the surface of the mirror a strange world can be seen with floating crystal platforms, glass shards and many more mirrors. Many people get lost inside the realm as it is very disorienting, and are often never seen again. This area connects to the Weaver Domain.

Gem
A girl often found within the Mirror Dimension. This 10 year old girl is gifted with powerful magic but does not understand her powers. She also seems heavily autistic and often uses her magic by accident. The mirror realm is a world she traverses often, despite it being very dangerous to do so. Gem often talks to inanimate objects, such as rocks, who are her friends.

Palewood Copse
A path surrounded by dead trees and plants, leads to the forest of dead trees known as Palewood Copse. The path is foggy and the air is cold and moist. It is completely quiet in this part of the forest. Strange ghostly vapors fly through the fog, pulling at the clothes of intruders and sounding ghostly cries. Not even spiders dare to venture here. The Palewood is where the spirits of deceased fey go before they are reborn. Will ‘o Wisps try to lure intruders further into the woods so they get lost. The fey refer to them as corpse lights. The Palewood is home to undead fey, showing that undeath is not always unnatural. A dangerous environmental effect of the copse is forgetting where you came from and why you are there. The forest messes with a person’s mind, altering their memories and their perception of time. This area also connects to the Twilight Vale.
 

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hopeless

Adventurer
I picture the Feywild being vital to the worlds they border on.
The very essence of nature and life is what they provide so closing off such portals can only have a detrimental effect to that world.
I like the idea of the Shadowfell being the dark dreary landscape of what that world might look like at the end, whilst the Feywild its original state before people started moving in and eventually ruining things...
 

cbwjm

Hero
That's pretty cool. So the "Feywild" and "Shadowfell" were more like seasons on the same plane of existence? That's interesting. I may have to take inspiration from this sometime in the future. I wonder what "Fall" (the Feywild transitioning to the Shadowfell, which actually fits well for the name Shadowfell) and "Spring" (Shadowfell transitioning to Feywild) would be like in that kind of world. It's an interesting concept. Thanks for sharing that!
I'd say that while closest to the positive energy it is a plane filled with mirth and joy, harmless pranks played on each other and rarely would a harsh word be heard or sadness be felt. As it moves away from the positive to the negative, pranks take on a more malicious bent as creatures of the feywild start to lose the joy they usually feel. Some fey twist and change, nymphs become hags, playful gnomes become hateful recaps. Eventually the feelings of joy and love they once had in abundance change to feelings of sadness, loss, and hatred over what they once had as they move fully into the power of the negative.
 

jgsugden

Legend
In my world, I have two planes: the mortal world, and the spirit world. So I borrow elements from the feywild, the shadow fell, and the elemental planes for the spirit world.
Would you mind expanding on how that works in your setting? I'm a fan of simplification, and combining these (and perhaps the Ethereal) is a step further than I've gone. What would a long trip within this plane be like?
 

hopeless

Adventurer
Out of curiosity that brief explanation above was it inspired by Avatar TLA?
It feels reminiscient I'm not sure if Korra might be a better comparison?
 

Yaarel

Mind Mage
I am digging all of this recent official attention to the Fey. The Fey Goblin, the rethinking the Fey Drow cultures, the Fey Witchfire adventure, the Strixhaven setting that is Fey enough for me, hopefully officially a Fey setting.
 

King Babar

God Learner
In my world, I have two planes: the mortal world, and the spirit world. So I borrow elements from the feywild, the shadow fell, and the elemental planes for the spirit world.
I do something similar for my own homebrew world, taking inspiration from works such as Glorantha, Artesia, and Princess Mononoke, to name a few. Essentially the spirit world exists in parallel with the material world, and spirits (elementals, fey, ghosts, etc.) can phase between the two as they wish, but experiencing the spirit world as a mortal is a treacherous and difficult proposition.

I find the Feywild, and most of DnD cosmology to be overly rigid. I prefer a more esoteric approach, some my "planes" are fewer and more fuzzily defined.
 

Hriston

Dungeon Master of Middle-earth
I agree in that I think of the Shadowfell and Feywild as immaterial as thought is immaterial. The Feywild is preserved within the memory of the world, whereas the Shadowfell is that which must be forgotten and cast into oblivion.

The fey, to me, are outsiders who have “gone native” in the Prime Material.

I think of the Shadowfell as something like the land of the dead that Odysseus sails to, and I think of the Feywild as the continent of Aman in the Silmarillion — a reflection of the earthly paradise, or the Garden of the Hesperides, but fallen as the world is fallen, and preserving a spark of renewal from the beginning.
 
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doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
So, we have the announcement of two new 5e books, Witchfire and Strixhaven. I am super-excited about these two.

The first one is an adventure in the Plane of Feywild. The second one is from the Magic The Gathering multiverse, likely a setting. As a Potter-esque plane of wizard colleges, Strixhaven is pretty much how I have already been running the Feywild since 4e.

What exactly is Feywild?

4e and 5e have written a number of conflictive descriptions about the Feywild. The concept of the Feywild seems to still be evolving. I emphasize the themes that resonate with me. I make the Feywild my own.

• Feywild and Shadowfell are "echoes" of the Material World.
• Fey and Shadow are polar opposites of the Material. In some sense they are opposites of each other. But exactly how seems unclear.
• The Material Plane is matter.
• Inferably, the Fey and Shadow are both immaterial "spirits".
• Shadow spirits are something like ghosts. Fey spirits are ... this is one of the questions.
• We have a clearer concept of the Shadowfell, more familiar with the concept of ghosts, and maybe with Hel or Hades or Sheol.
• Shadowfell is something like memories about the dead.
• The realm of the dead is a gloomy place of rest. The dead mainly rest, but can be restless.
• The opposite of the dead in Shadowfell, is not the living people of the Material. But rather, the opposite of dead is Fey.

• For me, Shadowfell is about the past, and oppositely, the Feywild is about the future.
• The Shadows are the memories of yesteryear, slowly being forgotten within the oblivion.
• Oppositely, the Fey are oracles about future years to come, the possible timelines that clarify as their time approaches.
• The concept of timelines corresponds to the concept of "Fate".
• The term Fey is a variant of Fay, from Faie, meaning ‘Fate’.
• A Faie is literally a spirit of Fate. Fairie or Fairy is the realm of the tapestry of Fate.
• Because the Fey can foretell the future in prophesies, there is also the sense the Fey can change reality by means of words.
• Thus, the Fey are personifications of magic words.
• The word "Fairie" literally means "magic", and is synonymous with the later term "magic" (from Magi).
• A Fairie creature means a "magical creature".
• I view the Fey as made out of magic itself.
• I view the immaterial Fey spirits as living constructs made out of arcane energy.

• I view both the Feywild and the Shadowfell as different "frequencies" sotospeak of Ether, and the Ethereal Plane as arcane energy.
• The Feywild is the aspect of the Ether that the Plane of Positivity energizes.
• The Shadowfell is the aspect of the Ether that the Plane of Negativity unravels.

• In ancient times, some Fey Eladrin chose to materialize into the Material Plane, magically taking on bodies of flesh and blood, whence Elf.

• Some times D&D describes the Feywild as "arcane", unnatural wizardy − other times as "primal", natural druidry.
• For me, the Feywild is unnatural, and is more about arcane magic.
• The main reason for the unnaturalism of the Feywild is its disconnect from the features of Material nature.
• The Shadowfell closely overlaps the Material, to the extent one can navigate the Material accurately despite the gloomier version of it.
• By contrast, the Feywild overlap warps extremely: time, distance, and even places, often lack a Material counterpart.
• Consequently, there is little or no link between a specific natural feature like a rock or a tree in the Material and a Fey spirit in the Feywild.
• For example, there is little feeling that a tree in this world is actually a specific Dryad in the spirit world.
• Thus, the Feywild works less well for a reallife animistic worldview, where each rock is a mind, and each tree is a mind.

• I personally use Psionic to represent any animistic traditions, in the sense rocks and trees exhibit mental influences forming communities.
• Animism is always about the Material world, and is never about somewhere else.
• The aspect of Psionics that focuses on the minds of the features of nature, rather than the minds of humanoids, is what Primal is.

• I am happy to focus on the Feywild as an unnatural realm of magic and a place of magically potential realities.
• The Eberron setting has an excellent version of the Feywild, corresponding to Thelanis.
• Thelanis focuses on the theme of fairytales, where like in a Twilight Zone, the stories that humans tell take on life of all their own.
• Thus the Feywild is literally made out of words and stories. Fey creatures are characters, who repeat a story.
• However, the Eladrin and a few other spirits have some autonomous reality to them, as tellers of tales.

• Eberron Thelanis lacks a sense of future timelines, in the sense of Fate, but it portrays well magic words becoming reality, in the sense of Fairie.

• In terms of adventure encounters, I emphasize magic.
• All Fey creatures are spellcasters, or similar. Fey are especially arcane, but out of curiosity about magic itself, might be divine or psionic.
• There are no Fey who have levels in a martial class, unless they learned them while in the Material Plane.
• I tend to run the Feywild as moreorless the Potterverse Wizard World. Everyone is different kinds of mages.
• The Fey culture revolves around the academic life of the magical schools.
• There are Fairy Courts, including the seasons, where magical power is social power.
• Different courts evolve different governmental structures, some are monarchy, some are democracy, but all are magical meritocracies.
• Plus I add courts for Norse Alfar in the sky, Scottish Sith in the glens, and English Shakespearean Fairy (who are mainly children with some teens).
• When Strixhaven arrives − cant wait! − I will probably add these colleges as courts within the Feywild.



I have other musings about the 5e Feywild. But this is probably plenty for now.

How do you make sense of the Feywild Plane in your campaigns?

What kind of themes do you run for Fey adventures? Do some of you play up the comical aspects of some fairytales, the alien aspects of severe ettiquette of some encounters with the Fair Folk, the things-are-never-quite-what-they-seem of some folktru encounters, or your own thing?
Great stuff. I’m at work so for now I’ll just paraphrase Tolkien. The Fey are supernatural in that they are the most natural. They are part of nature in a way and to a degree that mortals cannot even fully imagine, much less understand. A dewdrop fairy literally is the moment when dew settles on a flower petal or leaf, and is also a creature who makes the dewdrop.
 

Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
I tend to index the fey a little more to mortals than some of you guys do. I mean yeah, natural world whatnot, but I find the dreams/nightmares vector a little more rewarding at the table. YMMV.
 

Xeviat

Community Supporter
Supporter
Would you mind expanding on how that works in your setting? I'm a fan of simplification, and combining these (and perhaps the Ethereal) is a step further than I've gone. What would a long trip within this plane be like?
Oh, sure!

So, I do an animistic spiritual system. Everything has a spirit. The spirits of bigger, more important things are more powerful than the spirits of smaller, less important things (mountain vs Hill, river vs stream, forest vs tree). Worship and veneration empowers the spirits as well, so that the sling stone that slew a giant and is now enshrined is likely host to a more powerful spirit than the spirit of any other pebble (whose spirit is probably not sentient).

"Deity" is a title given to spirits generally more powerful, more important, or more active than others in the area, but this can vary. "God" is used generally to refer to deities that people worship to out of reverence and to gain their blessings. "Demon" is used generally to refer to deities that people worship out of fear, to appease, or to direct their wrath.

Furthermore, spirits can be nature spirits or ancestral spirits.

More pure areas of the spirit world are more like the Feywild. More corrupt areas are more like the Shadowfell.

That's kind of the gist.
 

Uni-the-Unicorn!

Adventurer
Honestly, I don't have a feywild. I don't use fey as enemies (unless they are specifically called for by a published adventure). In my mind they are wimpy, whimsical, and don't really feel appropriate for the type of fantasy I run. Probably my least favorite creature type.
Oh, I think of the Fey as much more dangerous than that, perhaps the most dangerous of all.
 

Yaarel

Mind Mage
Oh, sure!

So, I do an animistic spiritual system. Everything has a spirit. The spirits of bigger, more important things are more powerful than the spirits of smaller, less important things (mountain vs Hill, river vs stream, forest vs tree). Worship and veneration empowers the spirits as well, so that the sling stone that slew a giant and is now enshrined is likely host to a more powerful spirit than the spirit of any other pebble (whose spirit is probably not sentient).

"Deity" is a title given to spirits generally more powerful, more important, or more active than others in the area, but this can vary. "God" is used generally to refer to deities that people worship to out of reverence and to gain their blessings. "Demon" is used generally to refer to deities that people worship out of fear, to appease, or to direct their wrath.

Furthermore, spirits can be nature spirits or ancestral spirits.

More pure areas of the spirit world are more like the Feywild. More corrupt areas are more like the Shadowfell.

That's kind of the gist.

It is spot on that more important things are more powerful.

Generally, there is no "worship" in animism, regarding hunter-gatherer cultures. Worship implies a master-slave (lord-servant) relationship, and these didnt start coming into existence until cultures started to build towns and form bureaucracies.

Animism is more about families. There can be "veneration", but it is in the same way as one venerates ones own grandparents.

That said, a polytheistic spiritual system that involves nature worship often continues various customs from the more-ancient animistic past.
 

I've stolen the name of the Feywild from 4e Dark Sun for my Dungeon World game, but given it a completely different concept/structure.

I haven't nailed down all of its cosmology yet--an intentional effort on my part to keep it mysterious and, more importantly, not purely my idea, because it makes me lean into the ideas of my players more.

So there is a Land Between the Winds. To that place, the ancient El-Adrin went, long ago, just before the world was "changed" as a result of the coming of "the Burning Eye," some kind of entity that was imprisoned on their planet long ago. They referred to this being/entity by a title which, when translated from their language into the Common Tongue of the Tarrakhuna, reads as Azimech al-Saqqit: "The Uplifted And Fallen One." The seers of the El-Adrin had foretold that, when Azimech al-Saqqit came, it would spell the end of their civilization, because the fundamental nature of magic and the planet's cosmic essence would be altered somehow. Rather than accept that their civilization would come to an end, they undertook a great work to--somehow--translate their entire civilization, or at least their capital city and its surrounding territory, into a different reality: The Land Between the Winds.

The party has discovered a few of the lingering bits of infrastructure from the El-Adrin capital. They've also found a...thing, which is sort of, kind of like the magical equivalent of an extremely advanced "Virtual Intelligence" from Mass Effect (or, if you prefer, the non-sapient but vastly intelligent computer of the Enterprise-D), the "Guardian of the Threshold," which awaits two things: the destruction of Azimech al-Saqqit, and the return of the three "keys" that will signal the El-Adrin to return from the Land Between the Winds: the Sword, the Jewel, and the Mirror. Our party Battlemaster started with the Sword, the legacy of his elven forebears (which we now know to be the "changed" descendants of those El-Adrin who remained in the mortal world). He has received the Jewel from a trusted ally, who found it while on vacation in his distant homeland with his fiancee (who is a Tarrakhuna native). Now, he seeks the Mirror, which the party has reason to believe may be found in a swampy area near the northern border of the Tarrakhuna region, where it begins to verge into the jungles further north.

The El-Adrin were apparently very magically-inclined, and trafficked significantly with planar creatures--including celestials, which up to this point have explicitly never been documented as seen (that is, not seen within the last 2000 years, when mortals of the Tarrakhuna threw off the yoke of the genie-rajahs who ruled them...and, not-so-coincidentally, about the time when the Burning Eye/Azimech al-Saqqit was imprisoned in their world.) The party has previously met exactly one celestial being, a couatl, who very expressly was there without proper "authorization" so to speak, but she couldn't be specific about how or why. Unraveling these mysteries and discovering the lost history of the El-Adrin is an important plot-point, both for the group overall, and the half-elven Battlemaster specifically.

I'm extremely excited to see where it goes.
 

For me, Feywild is "Fey + Wild" so Faerie + Lost World, Oberon & Titania meet King kong & dinos

The Feywild is "the begining", a place of light, action, youth and ambition when the Shadowfell is "the end", a place of shadows, apathy, old age and lost memories.
 

Laurefindel

Legend
• For me, Shadowfell is about the past, and oppositely, the Feywild is about the future.
That’s an interesting twist. “Traditionally”, the realm of the dead is where people looked to to divine the future (the initial meaning of necromancy) while fairies were stuck in the past, unable of progress to the point of being allergic to iron and “new” monotheist religions, able to perfectly recreate art but unable of imagination (and therefore had to abduct humans for that).

both places are timeless, but if you asked me, the realm of the dead is where knowledge of future lies while the faerie realms is were the past survives modernity.

but all this is probably post-Napoleonic wars, a pivotal period in history where past and modernity were being redefined.
 

Yaarel

Mind Mage
That’s an interesting twist. “Traditionally”, the realm of the dead is where people looked to to divine the future (the initial meaning of necromancy) while fairies were stuck in the past, unable of progress to the point of being allergic to iron and “new” monotheist religions, able to perfectly recreate art but unable of imagination (and therefore had to abduct humans for that).

both places are timeless, but if you asked me, the realm of the dead is where knowledge of future lies while the faerie realms is were the past survives modernity.

but all this is probably post-Napoleonic wars, a pivotal period in history where past and modernity were being redefined.
Heh, I am surprised about the other way.



For me:

• Fey = fate ( ≈ future)
• Dead = fading memories ( ≈ past)

When I saw the reverse, I could see where they were coming from, but it surprised me

• Fey = pristine nature ( ≈ past)
• Dead = threat of destruction ( ≈ future)



Regarding traditionally, in Norse lore, when shamans want to know the future they themselves are psychic and can foresee the future. Now there are stories, where a future was particularly difficult to discern, so a shaman went to consult an other shaman to see if they can discover it. Sometimes, the other shaman is Alfar. Sometimes the other shaman is a dead Jotnar. And so on. But it is always one psychic getting help from an other psychic.
 

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