What is missing in 5E that you had in other editions?

Raith5

Adventurer
I do miss some of the things and ideas from 4e, especially the more complicated/surprising monsters, more tactical options for martial classes and more options for customizing character. One thing I notice that I miss in 5e are out of turn options in combats. I know the could slow things down, and I doubt that I would want to return as having as many out of turn options in 4e, but some would be nice to make combats a bit more dynamic.
 

ssvegeta555

Explorer
-Pets and summons

-monster templates

-proper supplements that that aren't a mish mash of random stuff thrown together like 5e books tend to be.

-actual campaign setting books

-spells and magic item compendiums

-incarnum

-Prestige classes

-more base classes

-psionics

-manual of the planes

-full fledged MMs, not half MM half whatever

-varied weapon stats

-alternate class features

-cure x wounds spell names, I know it's not needed for 5e but I really love the progression those spell names.

-+5 weapons/armor

-subsystems galore that was prevalent in 3.5.

In fact, I missed so much of that stuff I found it easier to return to 3.5 and just backport my favorite stuff from 5e over (HD healing, concentration limit, full attack after moving and more). ;) I felt at home again running 3.5 after over 10 years. :)
 

Shiroiken

Adventurer
I think the only thing I really miss would be multi-classing with demi-humans in AD&D. I do not like the 3E style multi-classing personally, but I understand why it was kept for 5E. I think the best way to represent this would be to take the classic "multi-class" options and create sub-classes for them. They've already done this with Eldritch Knight for the classic Fighter/Magic-User, and the War Domain is a solid Fighter/Cleric type. I wouldn't mind seeing this continued for things like the Fighter/Thief/Magic-User and such.

Oh, something else that I miss is tables with the value of magic items, rather than the overly broad system we have now. I don't want players buying magic items, but I'm okay with them selling or trading.
 

Al2O3

Explorer
A class where I can cause a lot of damage each round on my turn without having to be the one picking classes, feats and weapons for it. When I feel like "everyone else can do more powerful attacks than I", the solution should be "let the others do more attacks on my turn, but do it better". Throw in some healing and similar utility.

In short, I want the 4e Warlord back.
 

Jacob Lewis

The One with the Force
There are plenty of things I miss from old editions. Most have been mentioned already in this thread. But in all honesty, I would not change a thing. 5e serves its purpose well getting new people and interest into the hobby. This edition is for the new generation of gamers who are not burdened by the wants and wishes of editions past. I have plenty of old material and options to fulfill my wishful needs for a more complex and dynamic game, and the experience and wisdom to combine and adjust the rules from every edition to suit my tastes.

More importantly, if 5e gets too good then no one will ever want to try different games. Lately, I have been finding more people wanting to talk about different systems because they have grown bored with D&D. I can relate to them having been there myself. If it wasn't for 5e, I might not have discovered some truly innovative and alternative styles of play that have become my preferences; namely the Star Wars RPG, which has rekindled my passion for Star Wars in general, and more board games.

For this reason, I think 5e is perfect with all the missing pieces. Rather trying to scratch every possible itch, I think it has finally settled on a niche and has agreed to stay in its lane. Let everyone customize to taste, and allow gamers to try something different without trying to satisfy every alternative on their own. That just creates more division within the community, which it still suffers because we can never let go of our past. Let 5e be 5e. And let more gamers discover more games.
 

muppetmuppet

Explorer
Mechanical support for intelligence. While the new skill system is good, now that int is divorces for that system it really feels like the dump stat of the edition.

4e bloodied condition and mechanics for it.

4e monsters. Now there were problems with early monsters but ultimately I found as a dm it was easier to use stock 4e monsters and have interesting combats. Certainly can do it in 5e, just takes a bit more work and imagination.

3e charge. It’s probably the common rule my players “forget” is not in 5e
I use all these in my 5th e.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
What's missing? Well, in my personal opinion (feel free to disagree)
  • Generic classes that felt bland and only supported one play style preference because they tried to make all classes equal and gave everyone "powers" that for many people felt supernatural and somehow limiting as well.
  • Overly complex rules bloat that led to a high barrier of entry; system mastery allowed people to build PCs that were vastly more powerful. Rules upon rules that tried to dictate how to resolve everything that never really worked.
  • Quadratic power for fighters, exponential power for casters which was supposedly balanced by wizards being only slightly tougher than your average commoner at lower levels.
  • Weird backwards math, having to look up whether you hit on a chart.
  • Racial and gender limitations on what type of class you could have and how strong you could be (which in some cases was kind of logical, but it's a game)
  • If you wanted to be a fighter/wizard you had to be an elf.

Oh wait ... was this supposed to be a list of what I miss? Because that's not what the title says. Hmm. Okay: nostalgia for games I used to play that in their own way were fun but also flawed just like every other game in existence.
 

DMZ2112

Chaotic Looseleaf
The thing I find most compelling about D&D5 is the fact that anytime I sit down with the books to do campaign planning, I am reminded in a flood of all the things it does not do that D&D4 did, or that D&D3 did, or that Pathfinder does, or that AD&D2 did...

...but when I sit down at the table with my players and the session begins, none of that matters.

What I miss the most is personalization. D&D5 has good customization, but it doesn't have the breadth of options necessary for real personalization. AD&D2 and D&D3 both excelled at that (and were often waking nightmares as a result).
 

The Old Crow

Explorer
I miss really simple stat blocks for monsters. So simple they could often be reduced to a single line in some cases. Made adventure writing so much easier, and compact. I really, really miss this.

Oh, and wimpy orcs. Never read Tolkien, so AD&D orcs are my metric. 5 hp, a sword or spear, and no strength bonus damage. Could have a horde of them; it was quantity not quality when it came to orcs. Perfect fodder for 1st level parties.
 

DM Dave1

Adventurer
I miss really simple stat blocks for monsters. So simple they could often be reduced to a single line in some cases. Made adventure writing so much easier, and compact. I really, really miss this.
I know what you mean. At lower levels while running 5e, I was able to mostly get by with notes that included AC, HP, Attack and damage stats for each low level creature. Once Saving throws start coming into play, all bets are off. Need that stat block. Now I try to have my monster stat blocks printed off or bookmarked ahead of time. Keep things flowing.

Oh, and wimpy orcs. Never read Tolkien, so AD&D orcs are my metric. 5 hp, a sword or spear, and no strength bonus damage. Could have a horde of them; it was quantity not quality when it came to orcs. Perfect fodder for 1st level parties.
If you read Tolkien, you’d know that wimpy orcs are called goblins. :p

But, for serious, just assign them the minimum HP (8) as detailed in their stat block (2d8+6). Or, assign all members of the orc band 5 HP each as they’ve just come from a skirmish before the party stumbled upon them. And maybe have them carry clubs instead of their typical weapons. The wimpiness level is really in your hands as a 5e DM.
 
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77IM

Explorer!!!
Astral Diamonds.

No, seriously, they were a unique D&D thing, and I thought it was cool that the most valuable gem was so rare it had to be mined on another plane of existence. And in the 5E treasure tables, the highest-value gems (diamonds, rubies, etc.) are worth 5,000 gp, so it would be easy to make the next highest level be the astral diamond worth 10,000 gp.

I don't miss residuum, though. F@#$ that s%&*.
 

Draegn

Explorer
Astral Diamonds.

No, seriously, they were a unique D&D thing, and I thought it was cool that the most valuable gem was so rare it had to be mined on another plane of existence. And in the 5E treasure tables, the highest-value gems (diamonds, rubies, etc.) are worth 5,000 gp, so it would be easy to make the next highest level be the astral diamond worth 10,000 gp.

I don't miss residuum, though. F@#$ that s%&*.
I remember these too. I also remember that if you were fast enough you could cut out the heart of a demon or devil and get a black diamond or fire ruby worth 1000 gp per hd.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
What I miss the most is personalization. D&D5 has good customization, but it doesn't have the breadth of options necessary for real personalization. AD&D2 and D&D3 both excelled at that (and were often waking nightmares as a result).
One man’s waking nightmare is another’s paradise.
 

aco175

Adventurer
Printed modules that cost only a few bucks and I did not mind writing in.

Weapon leveling to +10 and item creation rules

4e monster rules

multi-classing that worked well and did not make me feel like the PC is falling behind
 

Ratskinner

Adventurer
The only thing about 5e that irked me when running it was the monsters. I'd have preferred a more 4e style of monster design. (IMO, the single best thing about 4e). With the glossing-over of a lot of the tactical detail, they could be super-simple stat blocks.
 

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