Review What is the best chain fast food restaurant?

What is the best chain fast food restaurant?


Mannahnin

Scion of Murgen (He/Him)
Buffalo Wings are just

Butter
Gotta be "Franks" Hot Sauce!!

Maybe a bit of garlic and onion powder, Sriracha, paprika and Cayenne and chili powder - Thats what I do, I've made some awesome wings that they had great flavor but were super hot,
My home-made sauce is just butter, Frank's, and a bit of red wine vinegar.

And yes, season the wings a bit first too. My quick and lazy route is just to use Tony Cachere's.
 

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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
3. In addition, I really don't like the fact that tipping has spread throughout all sorts of places. Look, I get it. It's a way for people to make more money. But you know what else is? Paying employees. I finally hit the limit when I was at a concert and buying an outrageously priced shirt, and was prompted to tip the person who sold me the shirt.

I'm finally resisting giving tips at most of the restaurants that are serve-at-the-counter with no wait-staff (whereas during COVID I regularly was happy to).

One exception is the place I'm a super-regular at for breakfast where my tip at the counter is well over 20% and another is our favorite local Italian place where I will tip like 10% on pick-up. Everyone is a fellow human being on this planet, but if the place you work is a particularly vital part of keeping my day on track it feels bad to me not to acknowledge that.

And of course, if it's sitdown with a server I put in the 20% unless the service (not kitchen) was bad. The exception there is it's much more for the one place we have a regular waitress for Sunday brunch.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
And of course, if it's sitdown with a server I put in the 20% unless the service (not kitchen) was bad. The exception there is it's much more for the one place we have a regular waitress for Sunday brunch.

This may be an unpopular opinion, but absent some really weird circumstance, I always leave the minimum (20%) even if the service appears bad.

There was a time when I worked in the service industry some time ago, so I know what it can be like. And you never know what might be happening behind the scenes or with the server that might cause the perceived issues.

That said, quality of service will affect my future decisions.
 

3. In addition, I really don't like the fact that tipping has spread throughout all sorts of places. Look, I get it. It's a way for people to make more money. But you know what else is? Paying employees. I finally hit the limit when I was at a concert and buying an outrageously priced shirt, and was prompted to tip the person who sold me the shirt.
I went to a Panera a couple months ago and used the self service register. Upon completing my order, it prompted me for a tip. Panera, or at least this location, gives you a buzzer that goes off when your order is ready so you can go grab it. This effectively means the staff is preparing my food and placing it on a counter for me to come get with no other service being provided since I also have to clean up my table when I leave. What exactly am I tipping for again?
 

R_J_K75

Legend
My home-made sauce is just butter, Frank's, and a bit of red wine vinegar.
Red Wine Vinegar sounds good, never thought of that I'll have to try that next time I make sauce. You have to play to the room, if they don't like them hot then you have a harder job to make them tasty as opposed to face melting. When it comes to making my own wings I'm my worst enemy, I don't like wings to be super-hot or spicy but it's hard to find that line sometimes.
And yes, season the wings a bit first too. My quick and lazy route is just to use Tony Cachere's.
I always season my wings ahead of baking them. I season them with olive oil then put them in a 350-degree F oven for 30-45 minutes. Then I sauce them.

There was a place around here for a very long time called the Red Brick Inn until they closed 15-20 years ago. They had great wings. They put something in their spice that made them very unique. I've known a few people that worked there and owners never gave them the recipe. We've often suspected it was nutmeg, but I've never been able to recreate it even remotely.
 

Sure, but telling someone they have to pay 18% service fee and 20% tip? Even if it costs average out (the joint I went too was already above average in price for the city) just build it into menu costs.
That seems to be mostly a Minneapolis thing. I’ve yet to see it in St. Paul or any of the suburbs I’ve been to a restaurant at.
 


R_J_K75

Legend
It's a backronym therefore there is a 98% chance it's completely and totally false
I agree with you here, I looked before I posted that in the first place and found no mention of this and came to the same conclusion that it was a local term or just wrong.
Personally I tip 10-20% depending on the nature of the service in the UK, and 20% on food service in the US
I don't bother with the math, $10-$20 minimum depending on the situation.
I've almost never reduced a tip for service in the US
I have. Late March me and my girlfriend went to what I'd call middle tier restaurant and had a pretty bad experience. We had 7PM reservations. Got there 6:45 and expected a few minutes wait. We got seated at 7:30. 7:30 defeats the purpose of making a reservation. The waitress was very inattentive and slow. At one point I had to get up and go to the bar and get my own beer. They gave out complimentary bread and soup which we got shortly after being seated, but it took 2 hours to get anything we actually ordered. I went to the bathroom and when I came out my girlfriend said she told them to pack it up to go. I had about 8 Heinekens, she drank a whole bottle of Coppola, so I'd say our bill should have been about $300. When they brought it to us it was $98 and some change. I tipped the bus boy, the bar tender a hell of alot more than I tipped the waitress. If the kitchen was backed up, bad night whatever, she should've communicated it, which she didn't. As far as I can remember all she did was take our order and we never saw her again for 2 hours, so she didn't even deserve the tip she got.
Unfortunately in London there's been this recurrent pattern, for like, 15+ years, where a new restaurant will open, and it'll be excellent, like undeniably great. For six months, sometimes a year.
It's sad because whilst Papa Johns isn't remotely as good as [local pizza place] in the US, it was better than the vast majority of UK pizza places and no longer really is (which is sad, because it's a low bar).
As my brother likes to say it's the law of diminishing returns. The more you eat at a certain place the worse it gets. 1st time it's great, 2nd time it's OK, 3rd time its crap and all downhill from there. He's pretty spot on.
 

R_J_K75

Legend
A lot of restaurants are now charging "service fees" to pay for benefits for employees.
That seems to be mostly a Minneapolis thing. I’ve yet to see it in St. Paul or any of the suburbs I’ve been to a restaurant at.
Maybe, check your tabs anyways you might have been paying them all along.
Service fees which put the burden on the customer are naughty word. How about try paying your employees what they are worth and dont expect the customer to foot the bill. Pre-pandemic I had only seen gratuity added when its parties 8 people and over, Besides bar and pub food I've only gone out to dinner where I was paying the whole bill a handful of times within the last 2-3 years. I have not seen any pre-added/assumed gratuity.
 

Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Service fees which put the burden on the customer are naughty word. How about try paying your employees what they are worth and dont expect the customer to foot the bill. Pre-pandemic I had only seen gratuity added when its parties 8 people and over, Besides bar and pub food I've only gone out to dinner where I was paying the whole bill a handful of times within the last 2-3 years. I have not seen any pre-added/assumed gratuity.

Iirc from the news, service fees were used in some in cities that passed increased minimum wage or other requirements to indicate to the customer that it wasn't that they were charging "more for the food" but because "the city is making us". As if the customers don't realize that the usual charge isn't just for the food, but also for the employees (and not paying them dirt hopefully).

I can imagine some places wanting to put the extra costs of inflatoin or whatnot off as a service fee instead of, for example, preinting new menus.

In any case, I'm guessing that the paying of the employees is pretty much always passed on to the customers. It's just a matter of how much extra profit for the owner that passing on is mingled with.
 

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