log in or register to remove this ad

 

What is the most detailed setting available?

GreyLord

Legend
I would say Frog God Games The Lost Lands, just for the amount of material. Their setting guide is also available to subscribe as a World Anvil world, which is very nice.

I got some items for that I think, Rappan Athuk? and Barakus?

How much stuff is on it?

Could you give me a list of the different books (or at least a starting point). I think I found the ideas intriguing from what I read originally, but no idea how much more there is out there or where to start.

Thanks
 

log in or register to remove this ad


zarionofarabel

Adventurer
If looking for detailed mapping, look no further than Kingdoms of Kalamar. It has an atlas that is hundreds of pages. It features borders, roads, trails, villages. The detail is unbelievable.
 

If looking for detailed mapping, look no further than Kingdoms of Kalamar. It has an atlas that is hundreds of pages. It features borders, roads, trails, villages. The detail is unbelievable.
It isn't bad, but both Harn and Runequest maps are much better quality.

And the latter is free: Argan Argar Atlas - Chaosium | RuneQuest Classic | Jonstown Compendium | DriveThruRPG.com

The Harn region map is free: Harn Region Map - Columbia Games Inc. | Atlas Maps | Kingdoms and Regions | HarnWorld Promotion Items | DriveThruRPG.com

You can buy national maps of the kingdoms of Harn, and even smaller, high detail maps of about 1:25,000 quality of the inhabited areas.
 
Last edited:

Jacob Lewis

Ye Olde GM
Faerûn is littered with many city-states, as well as proper kingdoms, states, and regions of governed and ungoverned populations that can be drawn with political boundaries.

But is this topic about the most detailed maps, or the amount of content written for a particular setting? Because I can tell you a lot about The Blade and Stars Inn, for example. It is located in Baldur's Gate, charges 3 cp for a pint of ale, and that it gets its name from the enchanted sign board looted from a ruined village in Amn after a trade-war. On cold nights, the proprietor, Aundegul Shawn, serves ruby cordial on request—a sweet, syrupy concoction of cherries dissolved in sugared red wine. (Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast, page 19).

Or, Hiexel trees are very common in the Dales, growing in thickets in ravines and on hillsides. They are rarer in the North, but can be found scattered there everywhere south of the Nether Mountains, particularly in the Rauvin and Delimbiyr vales. (Silver Marches, page 39)

Or, Midsummer and Shieldmeet are the most sacred days of the Oghmanyte calendar since they occasions when agreements are made or renewed and many contracts, bonds, and the like are drawn up. However, a priest of Oghma must observe two solemn rituals every day: the Binding and the Covenant. The Binding is a morning service wherein the symbols of Oghma are written in the dirt, in ashes upon a stone altar, or in the mind if a clergy member happens to be shackled or otherwise unable to write, while a silent prayer of loyalty and praise is made to Oghma. The Covenant is an evening service during which a passage from some work of wisdom is read aloud or recited from memory, a song or poem is offered up to Oghma, and some item of knowledge that the clergy member has learned during that day is spoken aloud to the god and to any fellow clergy present. (Faith's and Avatars, page 133).

But I suppose maps that lack political borders are stifling to the imagination. Hope this helps! ;)

political1.jpg
 

Attachments

  • political1.jpg
    political1.jpg
    246.4 KB · Views: 8

pming

Legend
Hiya!

Not sure if anyone mentioned this...but what about Mystara? It's got all manner of interesting fantasy countries/races/regions/etc. Just the Gazateers alone give us about, what, a thousand pages? And this doesn't even go into the extra boxed sets like Dawn of Alphatia, Hollow World and all it's books, or the 2e "Red Steel" ones. Mystara's got it all, really. If you want a campaign with any "semi-real-world fantasy flavour", Mystara's got it. :)

^_^

Paul L. Ming
 

Faerûn is littered with many city-states, as well as proper kingdoms, states, and regions of governed and ungoverned populations that can be drawn with political boundaries.

But is this topic about the most detailed maps, or the amount of content written for a particular setting? Because I can tell you a lot about The Blade and Stars Inn, for example. It is located in Baldur's Gate, charges 3 cp for a pint of ale, and that it gets its name from the enchanted sign board looted from a ruined village in Amn after a trade-war. On cold nights, the proprietor, Aundegul Shawn, serves ruby cordial on request—a sweet, syrupy concoction of cherries dissolved in sugared red wine. (Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast, page 19).

Or, Hiexel trees are very common in the Dales, growing in thickets in ravines and on hillsides. They are rarer in the North, but can be found scattered there everywhere south of the Nether Mountains, particularly in the Rauvin and Delimbiyr vales. (Silver Marches, page 39)

Or, Midsummer and Shieldmeet are the most sacred days of the Oghmanyte calendar since they occasions when agreements are made or renewed and many contracts, bonds, and the like are drawn up. However, a priest of Oghma must observe two solemn rituals every day: the Binding and the Covenant. The Binding is a morning service wherein the symbols of Oghma are written in the dirt, in ashes upon a stone altar, or in the mind if a clergy member happens to be shackled or otherwise unable to write, while a silent prayer of loyalty and praise is made to Oghma. The Covenant is an evening service during which a passage from some work of wisdom is read aloud or recited from memory, a song or poem is offered up to Oghma, and some item of knowledge that the clergy member has learned during that day is spoken aloud to the god and to any fellow clergy present. (Faith's and Avatars, page 133).

But I suppose maps that lack political borders are stifling to the imagination. Hope this helps! ;)
Harn lists the heraldic arms, crop acreage, and servile population for every landed knight in every kingdom.

As well as the full details of every tavern in every capitol, most major cities, and scores of others.

Plus every business of any sort in every capitol and most major cities.

I've never bothered with the religious system, but the book is over a hundred pages on a small pantheon. Plus there are amendments listing the most popular hymn-books, prayer books, and religious journals. Others listing shrines and holy sites.

It details the political and military maneuvers of two major wars and several smaller ones, both past and future.

The military forces of every kingdom are detailed down to arms, armor, and location.

Plants, trees, and beasts are covered in great detail, particularly dogs and horses.

And the maps depict borders. Down to 1:25,000 scale.

And everything is carefully inter-related and well-researched. You don't have a region housing a half-dozen sentient races and twenty+ 'monsters' in populations too small to be a sustainable gene pool.

:cool:

That said, I use Faerun myself on occasion, because if you toss in a fantasy post-apoc history and take a chainsaw to the monster listings, it can work. And the maps are free.
 

Bluenose

Adventurer
An issue with Glorantha - and I say this as a fan - is that there's a lot of repeated material across different editions. There's large parts of the world with a bare minimum of information, others which have had multiple books including repeating information that was in previous books. The information is often detailed and addresses aspects that most setting books don't, but the volume is a little misleading in terms of what actually is new.

Of course other settings - like FR - have the same issue.
 

Aldarc

Legend
This isn't 'what setting is best'; it is just people presenting settings with the most detail, and discussing them.
Tékumel is an inspiring setting that has many elements that I enjoy from a world-building perspective, but I don't actually think that Tékumel is the best setting. It's a highly detailed one. At times while reading through the materials, it feels as if one needs an anthropology and linguistics degree to penetrate the dense layers of Tsolyani society. I remember needing a chart, for example, that layed out Tsolyani clan and family relations, such as who counts as your sibling, mother/father, aunt/uncle, cousin, or not. The social values and structures of Tékumel are quite alien to contemporaneous Euro-American societies.
 
Last edited:

Its only one book and a few supplements, but A/State has a depth of detail that is very hard to top. It is the only RPG book I've ever read for reading's sake.
 

Tékumel is an inspiring setting that has many elements that I enjoy from a world-building perspective, but I don't actually think that Tékumel is the best setting. It's a highly detailed one. At times while reading through the materials, it feels as if one needs an anthropology and linguistics degree to penetrate the dense layers of Tsolyani society. I remember needing a chart, for example, that layed out Tsolyani clan and family relations, such as who counts as your sibling, mother/father, aunt/uncle, cousin, or not. The social values and structures of Tékumel are quite alien to contemporaraneous Euro-American societies.
I'm not deeply familiar with the nuts and bolts of the setting, but wasn't Tékumel written by high-voltage academics?
 


AtomicPope

Adventurer
RPG settings that were RPGs first and not adapted from a different medium, it's difficult but I'd have to go with Forgotten Realms. The problem is a lot of settings repeat information, update it for editions, and advance the timeline without really adding much. Some RPG worlds have a ton of information, modules, and supplements, but they're not popular. The old 3e Gamma World from the mid 80's had lots of information, modules, fluff, articles, and was completely different from any other game at the time, but it was a cult classic. When you consider what else was happening in RPGs, Gamma World 3e was cutting edge of sci-fi/fantasy. However, it does take place in an alternate future of Earth so the foundation isn't fully imagined. For this reason I'd leave out settings like Vampire the Masquerade completely because they are more a filter or lens to used to reimagine history than a created setting.
 

reelo

Adventurer
RPG settings that were RPGs first and not adapted from a different medium, it's difficult but I'd have to go with Forgotten Realms. The problem is a lot of settings repeat information, update it for editions, and advance the timeline without really adding much. Some RPG worlds have a ton of information, modules, and supplements, but they're not popular. The old 3e Gamma World from the mid 80's had lots of information, modules, fluff, articles, and was completely different from any other game at the time, but it was a cult classic. When you consider what else was happening in RPGs, Gamma World 3e was cutting edge of sci-fi/fantasy. However, it does take place in an alternate future of Earth so the foundation isn't fully imagined. For this reason I'd leave out settings like Vampire the Masquerade completely because they are more a filter or lens to used to reimagine history than a created setting.
The Forgotten Realms can't hold a candle to Hârnworld, sorry. The amount of minutiae is simply staggering.
 

Bluenose

Adventurer
I'm not sure how Traveller's Third Imperium setting rates in this. On the one hand, there's an absolutely massive amount of material from the various companies (and their own Open material) that have made products over the years. On the other hand - there's 11000 worlds in the Imperium, many haven't more than a short code describing them, one's outside often have less, so the detailed areas are rare. True also of course for other settings, but more obvious on the scale of a small patch of the Milky Way.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I got some items for that I think, Rappan Athuk? and Barakus?

How much stuff is on it?

Could you give me a list of the different books (or at least a starting point). I think I found the ideas intriguing from what I read originally, but no idea how much more there is out there or where to start.

Thanks
FGG books are insanely large and detailed.

It is a rather kitchen-sink type campaign world and the world itself is less flavorful than the adventures. But it is designed to give lots of space for DMs to add their own content if they want, while still having so much material you really don't have to do much world building at all.

I would start with buying the PDF or physical copy of the Lost Lands Setting guide. See if you like the flavor. If you already use World Anvil, you could also try to subscript to the Lost Lands world in World Anvil. You can do that with a free World Anvil account but you do have to pay Frog God Games for the subscription. The cross linked articles, the interactive map, and search functions make it a great way to full up setting information in-game or when prepping games.

After that, there are a variety of massive regional and city setting guides and even their adventure books have a wealth of setting information for the various regions. Some of the more popular are:

Bards Gate - large, detailed book for the City of Bards Gate
Borderland Provinces - setting guide for a large European-inspired fantasy area on the Eastern cost of one of the two main continents.
The Grand Duchy of Reme - a plains people setting
Tehuatl (Inca/Mayan inspired setting)
The Northlands Saga (viking inspired setting)
Razor Coast (pirate themed, island hopping setting)
City of Brass - huge setting and sandbox adventure for the City of Brass (other plane - connected to plane of fire)
Cyclopean Depths (underdark setting)

and there are many many more.

You mentioned Rappan Athuk. I'm in the third year of running a Rappan Athuk campaign. This is just one mega dungeon located in one of the provinces from Boarderland Provinces. But the already massive book has many linkages so that players can go from Rappan Athuk to the Cyclopean Depths, or to the City of Brass, or to Bard's Gate, or other areas. For my Rappan Athuk game I have also regularly used the Bard's Gate and Borderland Provinces books for regional setting material. I've also referenced the Cyclopean Depths and City of Brass books although the party has not yet gone to either location.

There are some areas where the setting could collect information from all their various books, flesh out some more, and put them into one source book. In particular, information on the cosmology and religions. They've been talking about kickstarting a book on the Regligions and Gods of the Lost Lands for a while now, and I am eager for them to do this. I would rather have this at this time rather than the alchemy book and magic items book they've recently published.
 

Voadam

Legend
I got some items for that I think, Rappan Athuk? and Barakus?

How much stuff is on it?

Could you give me a list of the different books (or at least a starting point). I think I found the ideas intriguing from what I read originally, but no idea how much more there is out there or where to start.

Thanks
Most everything but the most generic mechanics books from Frog God Games and Necromancer Games is set in the Lost Lands.

There are a number of setting books but the big one is the 518 page World of the Lost Lands.
 

Voadam

Legend
I've never bothered with the religious system, but the book is over a hundred pages on a small pantheon. Plus there are amendments listing the most popular hymn-books, prayer books, and religious journals. Others listing shrines and holy sites.
One of the parts of FR that I really enjoyed was reading the hundreds of pages on the pantheons in 2e: Faiths & Avatars, Powers & Pantheons, and Demihuman Deities.
 

I'm not deeply familiar with the nuts and bolts of the setting, but wasn't Tékumel written by high-voltage academics?
Many have compared Professor MAR "Phil" Barker favorably to Professor Tolkien... except that Phil Barker adopted RPGs as a secondary outlet for his worldbuilding.
I've not gotten into Tekúmel, myself, so I can't make a personal judgement. I can say those I've met familiar with Tekúmel compare it directly to Middle Earth in terms of worldbuilding, but note that it's set on a lost colony of a spacefaring Earth.
 

Committed Hero

Explorer
I'm not sure how Traveller's Third Imperium setting rates in this. On the one hand, there's an absolutely massive amount of material from the various companies (and their own Open material) that have made products over the years. On the other hand - there's 11000 worlds in the Imperium, many haven't more than a short code describing them, one's outside often have less, so the detailed areas are rare. True also of course for other settings, but more obvious on the scale of a small patch of the Milky Way.

The Imperium deserves special mention because you could set a campaign at a great number of times. There is playable setting material for the Interstellar War period, Year 0 of the Imperium, the Golden Age, the Rebellion, the New Era, and the alternate history where the Rebellion didn't happen.
 

Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top