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What is your biggest RPG heartbreak?

S'mon

Legend
any idea why?

I think I know how to set up and run a typical D&D-fantasy style campaign: starter village, local dungeon, more dungeons etc on a wilderness map. PCs get XP and loot from exploring the dungeons; rinse and repeat. With SF I don't really have the same competency; campaigns tend to feel linear, which doesn't generate the same energy. Compared to fantasy sandbox campaigning I think there is a profound lack of material for SF sandboxes, at least material that works for me.
 

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I think I know how to set up and run a typical D&D-fantasy style campaign: starter village, local dungeon, more dungeons etc on a wilderness map. PCs get XP and loot from exploring the dungeons; rinse and repeat. With SF I don't really have the same competency; campaigns tend to feel linear, which doesn't generate the same energy. Compared to fantasy sandbox campaigning I think there is a profound lack of material for SF sandboxes, at least material that works for me.
maybe it is the scale of sci fi anything more than a solar system and it gets hard to build stuff well.
 

John Dallman

Adventurer
Compared to fantasy sandbox campaigning I think there is a profound lack of material for SF sandboxes, at least material that works for me.
The difficult thing with "generic SF" is that different settings have very different technology and assumptions. You could write generic adventures for Star Trek-like settings, and you might be able to make those work for Traveller-like settings too, but getting them to work for Star Wars as well would be very hard.
 

S'mon

Legend
maybe it is the scale of sci fi anything more than a solar system and it gets hard to build stuff well.
Yes, scale is a big issue. Also SF has lots of different scales - planetary & space, notably. With fantasy you have limited mobility and I find it easy to create a fantasy sandbox with a home base, not so in space.

Mind you I haven't really done a fantasy seafaring campaign/sandbox either, maybe you need to be able to do that before you can work up to doing it in space.
 


Retreater

Legend
Tried to run a SF GURPS game one time. Characters ended up having tech that could just completely negate every challenge I could imagine. Oh, I can unlock that door. Oh, I can find any missing person or object. Oh, I can cut my way through those walls. Oh, I can remotely disable the engines of that escape pod. Oh, I can exist in the vacuum of space.
This is why I don't run SF.
 




MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
My first time going to Gen Con when I was in high school I got a chance to play a short demo of Gary Gygax's new game with Gary as game master. It was awesome to met and speak with him, but the game was...

Cyborg Commandos

I lied about liking the game and said I was going to buy it after getting money from my parents, which was another lie.
 


My first time going to Gen Con when I was in high school I got a chance to play a short demo of Gary Gygax's new game with Gary as game master. It was awesome to met and speak with him, but the game was...

Cyborg Commandos

I lied about liking the game and said I was going to buy it after getting money from my parents, which was another lie.
I was probably 20 and went to Gen Con in Milwaukee. I had my AD&D players and other books ready for an autograph, just in case.

In a booth was Gary Gygax and one other individual. There was no line at this moment. I debated with a friend about getting his autograph and ultimately decided not to bother him.

a quarter century later I am still annoyed with my youthful social anxiety. Some years later I sent an email and got a response from him.

He said if you are at a con “do buttonhole me.”

classic gygax. I had to look up “buttonhole” though I was able to infer the meaning. But bottom line: he would have gladly signed my books. And now of course it’s too late.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I was probably 20 and went to Gen Con in Milwaukee. I had my AD&D players and other books ready for an autograph, just in case.

In a booth was Gary Gygax and one other individual. There was no line at this moment. I debated with a friend about getting his autograph and ultimately decided not to bother him.

a quarter century later I am still annoyed with my youthful social anxiety. Some years later I sent an email and got a response from him.

He said if you are at a con “do buttonhole me.”

classic gygax. I had to look up “buttonhole” though I was able to infer the meaning. But bottom line: he would have gladly signed my books. And now of course it’s too late.
Was the other individual Dave Arneson?
 

Two systems that I was really excited about but alas:

MERP. Awesome lore! Not so awesome rules IMO. At least I can reuse those awesome maps.
Oh, but the rules are awesome, too. Just not a good fit for the awesome setting work!

The rules, as a game not set in Middle Earth, are excellent. At least at low levels, which is as much as I've played/run.

It's Rolemaster Light. With a number of streamlining elements making it approachable. Run some D&D modules with it, and it shines.
 


Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
Minor Heartbreak: I played a lot of Infinity the miniature game. Loved the rules, loved the setting. When Corvus Belli announced a RPG I was super hyped. But when I saw it would use the 2d20 system by Modiphius I was turned off. Infinity already has a d20 roll under system integrated in it. They should have used that as basis for their RPG.
 

Two systems that I was really excited about but alas:

MERP. Awesome lore! Not so awesome rules IMO. At least I can reuse those awesome maps.

Dangerous Journeys. Probably the less said the better.
We played MERP for years. What a taxing system, but for some reason, we didn't mind it when we were young. (Magic system was so terrible too.) Then, we switched to Dangerous Journeys. We used Thunder Rift from D&D as the setting. It might have been some of the best gaming we have ever done. We loved the ruleset. That said, it was lopsided to say the least for assassins and magic-users that had that special bonus (forgot what it was).
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I was probably 20 and went to Gen Con in Milwaukee. I had my AD&D players and other books ready for an autograph, just in case.

In a booth was Gary Gygax and one other individual. There was no line at this moment. I debated with a friend about getting his autograph and ultimately decided not to bother him.

a quarter century later I am still annoyed with my youthful social anxiety. Some years later I sent an email and got a response from him.

He said if you are at a con “do buttonhole me.”

classic gygax. I had to look up “buttonhole” though I was able to infer the meaning. But bottom line: he would have gladly signed my books. And now of course it’s too late.

That's a bummer but also cool that he responded to your e-mail so positively.

I did get him to sign my issue #1 of Polyhedron. Not sure why that, it is just what I had handy, I suppose. I wish I would have brought one of the Greyhawk booklets from the boxed set or a module like Through the Looking Glass.
 


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