What's the future of the Forgotten Realms?

What will WotC do with the Forgotten Realms?

  • Eberron Treatment in 2019, possible hardcover later on

    Votes: 2 2.6%
  • Eberron Treatment in 2020+, possible hardcover later on

    Votes: 3 3.8%
  • Hardcover Setting Book in 2019

    Votes: 4 5.1%
  • Hardcover Setting Book in 2020+

    Votes: 5 6.4%
  • Nothing - Leave as default and expand through story arcs

    Votes: 58 74.4%
  • Game Over, Man - They're done with the Realms after Waterdeep/Undermountain, the last hurrah

    Votes: 6 7.7%

  • Total voters
    78

TwoSix

Lover of things you hate
Forgotten Realms will continue to be what D&D is, unless you choose to play somewhere else.
 

jgsugden

Explorer
What I think they may eventually do is take the ORIGINAL boxed set and rerelease it in 5E with 5E stats and slight updates (probably in a hardcover) - FR Classic, if you will. That would appeal to many players - FR the way it started.
 

Henry

Autoexreginated
My 3rd edition FR guide still works perfectly well.
Indeed, the last FR game I ran for 5e I set in DR 1372, because there’s just not enough info out there for the realms at large post-4e time jump, whereas for the 3e FR book, I know rulers, I know current threats, I know NPCs, etc. the Sword coast guide only gives me this for a fraction of what the FRCS did. I know tons about the sword coast, but if I want to run in, say waterdeep, or the dalelands, or hillsfar, i’m Out of luck, so back to 1372 I go!
 
As much as I'd love for them to move away from it entirely for at least a while, just to give the other settings some AP love, what I expect to happen is that they'll continue exactly as they have been. It'll remain the default, it'll remain the home of most APs, but there won't likely be a "sourcebook."
Agree completely, wish they would go away from it but they wont. We wont get any straight hardcover source books on it but we will continue to get hardcover mega modules that act as mini source books.
 
Indeed, the last FR game I ran for 5e I set in DR 1372, because there’s just not enough info out there for the realms at large post-4e time jump, whereas for the 3e FR book, I know rulers, I know current threats, I know NPCs, etc. the Sword coast guide only gives me this for a fraction of what the FRCS did. I know tons about the sword coast, but if I want to run in, say waterdeep, or the dalelands, or hillsfar, i’m Out of luck, so back to 1372 I go!
Well, we'll be getting Waterdeep updated in a few weeks at least. And I wouldn't be surprised to see if they start ranging further and further away from the Sword Coast as time goes by. Both Lantan and Cormyr were mentioned in recent Lore You Should Know segments, so it wouldn't be surprising to see them featured in the relatively near future. It would make sense for Cormyr especially, as it's always been one of the core adventuring areas for the setting...
 

CapnZapp

Adventurer
With the Eberron PDF and the Ravnica hardcover, WotC has declared that they are no longer setting-shy. It seems that the likely course of action is that they will release other "classics" in PDF form first, with possible hardcover treatments down the road if that setting proves popular (and profitable).

But what about the Forgotten Realms? It is the default for most of the story arcs so far, and already has one sorta setting product. On one hand, it is the most likely to receive a full hardcover, on the other it may be that WotC wants to leave it vague and undefined so that they have freedom to explore and expand through story arcs.

I could see several routes:

*The Eberron Treatment: They do a PDF, probably sooner than later, and possibly (hopefully) written by Ed Greenwood. One thing that makes this likely is that it is relatively easy to do, both because there's tons of lore out there already--and I'm sure Ed could write it up over a weekend--and also because it is pretty much 5e RAW, so no playtesting needed.

*Hardcover book: In some ways it is kind of crazy that WotC hasn't published a 5e setting book for the Forgotten Realms. There are so many great hardcover setting books out there, from Paizo's Golarion to Kobold's Midgard to Critical Role's Tal'Dorei. Why not WotC? Furthermore, I have heard fans of the setting complain that it is still unclear what the 5e looks like: did the geographic changes from 4e's Spellplague hold or are we back to "Realms classic?" Or something else?

*Nothing: This leaves things flexible, and the Realms as the undefined default setting for future story arcs, which will flesh out regions like they did with Chult, the Sword Coast, soon Waterdeep, etc. We might see a Moonshaes story arc, or Anauroch, Dale Lands, Thay, Raurin, Al-Qadim, etc.

So what do you think? What path will WotC take?

One final note. They may not know themselves, and will wait to see how Eberron and Ravnica do. Of course the success (or lack thereof) of a Realms product is probably not connected to either, but maybe they simply want to see numbers sold first.
Huh?

They've explored FR through several supplements: Princes of the Apocalypse and Storm King's Thunder together form an excellent gazetteer on the Dessarin Valley area, just to pick one example.

Publishing a pure campaign guide is apparently not gonna happen: the format so far is to make every book sellable to every player: the DM and the group.
 

gyor

Adventurer
Until last week, I might have agreed with you. Now we need to wait and see how the Ravnica and (possibly) Eberron hardcovers do. If they prove wildly popular, they may revisit the Realms with a more comprehensive setting guide...
That is my hope as well.
 

gyor

Adventurer
And we might not have even gotten that if the Sword Coast Legends video game had not come out at the same time, seeing as the SCAG was advertised to be as much a primer for that game as it was for 5E.
Then I hope someone comes out with a video game involving the rest of the Forgotten Realms even more ;)
 

Zardnaar

Hero
Huh?

They've explored FR through several supplements: Princes of the Apocalypse and Storm King's Thunder together form an excellent gazetteer on the Dessarin Valley area, just to pick one example.

Publishing a pure campaign guide is apparently not gonna happen: the format so far is to make every book sellable to every player: the DM and the group.
Thats not ahrd to do the 3.0 one had heaps of good player stuff.
 

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