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D&D 5E Which MTG Setting would you want as an official D&D Setting (updated post-Strixhaven)?

What MTG Plane would you like to have an official D&D Setting Book?

  • Alara

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Amonkhet

    Votes: 5 11.1%
  • Dominaria

    Votes: 6 13.3%
  • Eldraine

    Votes: 3 6.7%
  • Ikoria

    Votes: 3 6.7%
  • Innistrad

    Votes: 2 4.4%
  • Kaldheim

    Votes: 3 6.7%
  • New Phyrexia

    Votes: 2 4.4%
  • Tarkir

    Votes: 3 6.7%
  • Zendikar

    Votes: 3 6.7%
  • A different MTG Plane

    Votes: 7 15.6%
  • No more MTG setting books!

    Votes: 8 17.8%

  • Total voters
    45

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Hello! I thought I'd make a new version of this poll, because Strixhaven has been announced and it looks likely that MTG settings are definitely an ongoing trend.

I haven't included every MTG setting here because there are many, but I included rank 5 or better on the Rabiah scale. I also know some of these have a Planeshift article, but I don't think that would stop an official book release, especially as it would likely be paired with a new card set that updates the plane somewhat.

 

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LadyElect

Explorer
I mentioned Lorwyn-Shadowmoor being my forever pick in the other topic.

But I’d certainly pick up anything based on Alara, Zendikar or Mirrodin/Phyrexia. And Eldraine basically writes itself so might as well throw it in there.
 

Innistrad and Eldraine are good options. I wouldn't dismiss Kaldheim.

I suggest after Kamiwaga: Neon Dinasty a new setting based in cultures and folklore from Far East, but not only with Japanese influences but also from China, Korea and other nations as source of inspiration. We would a lot of work about the different markets from Asia have got special points of view about themself and their neighbours and we don't troubles because somebody said anything unpolite without noticing.

I wonder about a new crossover with D&D, this time Greyhawk or Dragonlance. Jakandor is almost totally forgotten or unknown but this is the reasy to do it because the risks are lesser.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Khaladesh.

After that I’d put Zendikar, Eldraine, and then lots of others.

But above all those, I want a Gatewatch’s Guide To The Planes, with info on a bunch of worlds, and worldbuilding tips, tables, etc,
 


The story of Kamiwaga was more like a "one-shot", too small when a true setting should be like a sandbox.

Ilkoria has got a lot of "kaijus" or gargatuan monsters perfect for some crossover with a no-D&D franchise (dinobots, dino power rangers, Ultraman)... but it is not the best setting for low level PCs. Maybe if there is a module of optional rules about tamed monster pets then the things would be different.

Innistrad is the best option for the no-MtG fandom. It allows a lot of open space to add elements when Ravenloft is too "small", for example fights among supernatural factions (vampire clans, theriantropes tribes, dark fae courts, witch covents, wraith guilds, monster-hunter brotherhoods...)

About Ixalan my opinion is the morrion is a fashion accesory too cool and fabulous to be only wore by the bad guys. I reclaim a positive discrimination quota of morrion-wearers in the band of the good and nice characters.
 



The story of Kamiwaga was more like a "one-shot", too small when a true setting should be like a sandbox.

Ilkoria has got a lot of "kaijus" or gargatuan monsters perfect for some crossover with a no-D&D franchise (dinobots, dino power rangers, Ultraman)... but it is not the best setting for low level PCs. Maybe if there is a module of optional rules about tamed monster pets then the things would be different.

Innistrad is the best option for the no-MtG fandom. It allows a lot of open space to add elements when Ravenloft is too "small", for example fights among supernatural factions (vampire clans, theriantropes tribes, dark fae courts, witch covents, wraith guilds, monster-hunter brotherhoods...)

About Ixalan my opinion is the morrion is a fashion accesory too cool and fabulous to be only wore by the bad guys. I reclaim a positive discrimination quota of morrion-wearers in the band of the good and nice characters.

"The story of Kamiwaga was more like a "one-shot", too small when a true setting should be like a sandbox"

You just described 90% of MtG setting, it's why very few are good for converting to D&D honestly, most are too shallow, and the 10% that aren't often have other issues.

Of the settings that haven't been done only Kaldheim, Alara, Eldraine, and Tarkir are big and sandboxy enough to justify full fledged setting books that aren't primarily an adventure with a setting gazeteer attached.

Honest I actually think it could be 4 to 5 years before we get another MtG D&D setting book, because the best MtG D&D setting crossover settings won't be coming around for 1 to 2 years at least.
 

TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
I hesitated between Dominaria and Zendikar.

Zendikar is such a great concept. The idea of adventure is one of the core design concept of the block. It was also one of the best block I've played.

Dominaria is such a rich setting. And by MTG's decentralized and scattered nature, it's not so fixed that you can't pick parts and do what you want with them. And the setting has so much stuff that you could have a series of book with the different continents and creatures.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I also know some of these have a Planeshift article, but I don't think that would stop an official book release, especially as it would likely be paired with a new card set that updates the plane somewhat.
James Wyatt has said in the past that it would prevent those worlds from gettinga visit, but obviously things change over time.
 

Kamiwaga is too "small" as a sandbox because the plot is too linked with the kami war. Without this the setting is relatively boring. The other settings allowing different stories, not always about international conflicts or cosmic events but surviving a day in the streets.
 

I am not sure why people keep including in polls like these the MtG settings that got Planeshift articles, since James Wyatt has pretty much said those will not see hardcover books. Also, am I getting names mixed up or does this poll not include any of the Eastern-themed settings? Either Far East or Central Asian? Or is Tarkir the Central Asian one? I voted Other because of that. But if I had to choose one on the list, it would be Amonkhet, as I think that is the Egyptian-themed one? Or Tarkir, if that is the Central Asian one.
 

I have searched about future publishing in 2022 and maybe we could see a new setting based in African cultures.

Hasbro wants some new brand setting for the Asian market but the different countries have got particular tastes. For example people from the country like megacities with high skycrappers because these are exotic, but people from the big cities would rather nature zones because these are "exotic" for their eyes, the rural regions aren't watched usually. Other example is Falcon Crest, a famous soap-opera from the 80's set in the Tuscany valley, dedicated to the production of wine. The show wasn't so popular in USA but it was in Europe because in our culture driking wine is normal. We have to adapt to the tastes of the different regions.

Or some character could be a rip-off parody of some famous franchise. If the author is from the same nation then everyody has fun, but if it is from other country then somebody may feel offensive (it is like that fantasy comedy Chinese movie where the antagonists are rip-off of marvel supeheroes in a challengue of "magic" soccer). Other times the message may be misunderstanded. For example Jack Burton, played by Jack Russell in "Trouble in China" is almost a affectionate parody of the action-heroes. In the final confroctation against the boss he saves the day, but we know he is not the smartest character of the story, but relatively the dumbest. Jack Burton isn't promoting the "toxic masculinity" but paroding this.

Son Goku, the main character of Dragon Ball, is a too freely version of the famous Chinese mythologic character Sun Wukong, the monkey king. Somebody could create the magical-girls/maho shojo version of famous mythologic male characters Somebody would accept those changes and other wouldn't.

I would love a D&D version of East Asian fantasy but we should be very, very, very careful, because you don't notice but you discover somebody is angry by something.
 

Professor Murder

Adventurer
I have searched about future publishing in 2022 and maybe we could see a new setting based in African cultures.

Hasbro wants some new brand setting for the Asian market but the different countries have got particular tastes. For example people from the country like megacities with high skycrappers because these are exotic, but people from the big cities would rather nature zones because these are "exotic" for their eyes, the rural regions aren't watched usually. Other example is Falcon Crest, a famous soap-opera from the 80's set in the Tuscany valley, dedicated to the production of wine. The show wasn't so popular in USA but it was in Europe because in our culture driking wine is normal. We have to adapt to the tastes of the different regions.

Or some character could be a rip-off parody of some famous franchise. If the author is from the same nation then everyody has fun, but if it is from other country then somebody may feel offensive (it is like that fantasy comedy Chinese movie where the antagonists are rip-off of marvel supeheroes in a challengue of "magic" soccer). Other times the message may be misunderstanded. For example Jack Burton, played by Jack Russell in "Trouble in China" is almost a affectionate parody of the action-heroes. In the final confroctation against the boss he saves the day, but we know he is not the smartest character of the story, but relatively the dumbest. Jack Burton isn't promoting the "toxic masculinity" but paroding this.

Son Goku, the main character of Dragon Ball, is a too freely version of the famous Chinese mythologic character Sun Wukong, the monkey king. Somebody could create the magical-girls/maho shojo version of famous mythologic male characters Somebody would accept those changes and other wouldn't.

I would love a D&D version of East Asian fantasy but we should be very, very, very careful, because you don't notice but you discover somebody is angry by something.
The best starting point for creating works which are a pastiche of a specific culture and reducing the chance of causing offense is to have members of that culture be leading the creative team and making up as large a part of said team as possible. The issue with an "Asian Inspired" setting, as an example, is often that it is crafted by non-Asians who may have sincere love for the cultural settings they are engaging with, but its all crafted through their outside perspective. I would love to see more PoC settings by major publishers, created by PoC creators. They are out there. Hire them.
 

I agree the best idea is to ask people from the different nations, but these could have got predjudices against their neighbours or even against compatriots from a different region. I support the idea of "chop-suey" culture, mixing things from differet in the same way "Wester D&D" mixes mythologies from different European countries (Greek, Irish, German,..).

Somebody could say the asuras are infernal outsiders, but other replies really asuras are celestial outsiders. In some Chinese stories the imperial dragons or lungs are the big bad guys, the antagonists. Even the own fandom can't agree about who is cooler, Sakura Casi-os-gano Kasugano or Chun-li, or Sodom vs Fe-Ling (Street Fighter videogames). We could find troubles because in a setting the creatures from Russian folklore are the good guys and from the German mythology are the bad guys, but in other work by a different author the Russian creatures are the antagonists and the characters by the Grimm Brother's fairy tales are the super-mega-cool heroes who are saving the day.

The first step should be some UA about PC races. Lots of 3PPs would be willing to publish monster compediums about yokais, shens and monsters from Asian folklore.

The shen as PC race need practical and interesting racial traits, and more than the classic "we are more than ordinary humans, but we would rather to live in the middle of the wild nature and the edges of the civilitation". The hengeyokai as PC race could be very popular but the shapesifter traits could break the power balance.

And we can't forget D&D has got its own style about how to tell the stories. The most of current fiction is very focused into the main character but D&D is about the team spirit and together learning to cooperate and mutually accept. although they were from different origins..or races lineages or totally different personalities (and point of view about polite manners and protocols). The xianxian subgenre is almost the opposite, where the main here practically monopolizes the protagonism. Here I miss the wisdow of the "little grasshopper", when the scrippters really said some things that could help to be better person. (And the sequel of Kung Fu set in the current age was a total "jumping the shark").

First we need the right tools and after we can start to build. If the right tools are offered, these will be used by third parties to create their own settings, not only TTRPGs but game-live streaming shows and animation and comics(manga, manhua and manhwa).

Other option is to publish wuxia fiction but with a western look. Hercules (the serie played by Kevin Sorbo) and Xena (that gave fame to Lucy Lawless) was practically wuxia but with a cover of Greco-Roman myths.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I am not sure why people keep including in polls like these the MtG settings that got Planeshift articles, since James Wyatt has pretty much said those will not see hardcover books. Also, am I getting names mixed up or does this poll not include any of the Eastern-themed settings? Either Far East or Central Asian? Or is Tarkir the Central Asian one? I voted Other because of that. But if I had to choose one on the list, it would be Amonkhet, as I think that is the Egyptian-themed one? Or Tarkir, if that is the Central Asian one.

If you read my OP, I pointed out how if a plane with a planeshift article gets a new card set, I see no reason why an updated version of that plane is ineligible for a book. James Wyatt while influential is not the head of the D&D team, and things change over time. There used to be a real that crossovers between D&D and MTG were entirely off-limits, and that has obviously been thrown out the window.
 

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