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WotC President: D&D Up 30% in 2018; More MtG Crossovers Coming

30+% growth for 4 straight years, on a product 40 years old is unheard of
 

Comments

MechaPilot

Explorer
Granted that each edition is a separate product line, it is unheard of in D&D for year four to be the biggest year of an edition. 3.0 and 4E were already gone by the same point, and 5E is on Pace to surpass 3.5 timr in print in a matter of months.
Did I say it wasn't impressive?



Also, @bedir than, it's odd that you give @Parmandur XP for stating that each edition is a separate product line, while giving me a hard time about making that exact same statement. Is your real issue with my post that you don't think I'm impressed enough by their growth?
 

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D1Tremere

First Post
I don't mind the MtG crossover book (though I would have preferred Eberron get a full 5e treatment, or many other settings). What does concern me (much like the competitive D&D noise) is the possibility of diluting or destroying the thing I enjoy in order to milk more money from a larger and more generic base.
MtG is a game where people compete against each other using characters and lore that are usually incidental to the game being played. The player takes on the role of a powerful Plainswalker (though not really, as there is nothing in MtG that encourages role playing). In D&D, even level 20 characters would be hard pressed to do what a MtG player can do, so I am not sure how or why the two should be mixed. The lore in MtG was an afterthought to competitive mechanics that has become larger in order to sell tie in novels and other generic merch.
I like MtG, I played tournament level Magic for years, but I have never felt the desire to mix it with my role playing groups games.
 

Parmandur

Legend
I don't mind the MtG crossover book (though I would have preferred Eberron get a full 5e treatment, or many other settings). What does concern me (much like the competitive D&D noise) is the possibility of diluting or destroying the thing I enjoy in order to milk more money from a larger and more generic base.
MtG is a game where people compete against each other using characters and lore that are usually incidental to the game being played. The player takes on the role of a powerful Plainswalker (though not really, as there is nothing in MtG that encourages role playing). In D&D, even level 20 characters would be hard pressed to do what a MtG player can do, so I am not sure how or why the two should be mixed. The lore in MtG was an afterthought to competitive mechanics that has become larger in order to sell tie in novels and other generic merch.
I like MtG, I played tournament level Magic for years, but I have never felt the desire to mix it with my role playing groups games.
The PCs would more be individual cards, I guess.
 

gyor

Legend
I don't mind the MtG crossover book (though I would have preferred Eberron get a full 5e treatment, or many other settings). What does concern me (much like the competitive D&D noise) is the possibility of diluting or destroying the thing I enjoy in order to milk more money from a larger and more generic base.
MtG is a game where people compete against each other using characters and lore that are usually incidental to the game being played. The player takes on the role of a powerful Plainswalker (though not really, as there is nothing in MtG that encourages role playing). In D&D, even level 20 characters would be hard pressed to do what a MtG player can do, so I am not sure how or why the two should be mixed. The lore in MtG was an afterthought to competitive mechanics that has become larger in order to sell tie in novels and other generic merch.
I like MtG, I played tournament level Magic for years, but I have never felt the desire to mix it with my role playing groups games.
Premending would be more powerful, maybe then a level 20 PC, post mending most Planeswalkers would not be be. Maybe Nicol Bolas or Jace would be more powerful then a level 20 PC. Maybe.

Example would be the fact that a level 20 PC is a staight up better planeswalker then an MtG Planeswalker. A PC can use a gate spell to open a portal to let countless beings back and forth, cast Planeshift to take them and others to another plane, cast banish to send a being back to their plane of origin, cast etherealness, none of which an MtG character post mending can do. All being a planeswalker in MtG allows the planeswalker to do is transport to another world/plane, by yourself, with a few small items, a process that is hard and tiring and can't normally be done in battle, although exceptions exist.
 
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