WotC Salvage: 1001 Clever Traps

SuperTD

Explorer
An interesting and very long thread on traps I'm going to try and port over to here slowly over the next month. Thanks to @MerricB for the tool to make this so much easier!

[sblock=Page 1] Originally posted by kraleck:

Are you a DM? Do you need a clever trap but have no time or imagination? Then do we have a thread for you Explosive Runes. There are all sort of traps that we would like to make but cannot properly implement due to difficulty or vast complexity of the trap. Let's come up with some good, mostly simple traps everyone.

Let me kick things off with:

1. The PCs hear growling in the next room (just a magically looping recording through a speaker). Through the door is a long, darkened (but not completely dark) hallway that the PCs are unable to see the other side of. Eventually the PCs find that the hallway just goes on and on and on and on and on...
This trap is actually a teleportation trap. When the PCs get so far down a long hall, let's say 2/3 of the way through, they are teleported back to about the 1/3 mark of the hall. This is a good way to kill time to wear out buff spells that the PCs will have cast before entering the hall and wasted.
If the PCs see that they are looping back with Search checks or by having one person scout ahead and come up from behind his allies, then the PCs can avoid the teleportation effect by making an Escape Artist check (aided by Balance if they have 5+ ranks) to slide against the wall around the teleport field (it is 3 feet away from both walls).

Let's see what traps you can come up with for beginner players and DMs.

Originally posted by pierow37:

OK.

The PC's enter a 15 foot, by 15 foot room. On the far side is a locked door. in the middle of theh room is a time telling device, but the hands are movable. They are also detachable. but come back if you are not touching the squares adjacent to the time telling device. Just use as the returning ranged magic weapon effect. One is red, and has in absyll: 1, the other is dragonic and reads: 2.
There are 2 runes of each side, one north, one south. the north one reads, in dragonic: OPEN, while the other reads in absyll: CLOSE. One of the two hands is facing one of them, one racing open, other facing closed.
If both hands are put on open, the time telling device explodes dealing 4d8+12 to everyone in the room. but also opens the door. If both hands are on closed, then the same thing happens.
a DC search check 20 reveals a small hole on each side of it, if BOTH clock hands are inserted into the things, then itn will work. but the Absyll one MUST go in the dragonic one. and vis versa. If they are inserted the wrong way, the same thing happens as above, but dealing a critical hit X2.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Simple pit trap - worked well as follows ; pit has two flaps over it first one has its pivot at the near end and is 10 feet long . Second flap has its pivot half way along its length and is also 10 feet long . A spring loaded prop supports the first flap ( by flap i mean a foot or two thick section ) and does not collapse until 200 lbs is at the far end of it - usually this is the fighter - it then swings down and thanks to a lip at the bottom edge the other flap now swings downwards as well . The theif , who is usually very light goes across and pronounces that all is well so then the rest of the party follows . When the big heavy fighter in all his heavy armour crosses he sets off the trap , which would be a reflex save - not exactly a fighters forte - and drops into the very deep pit . Other PC's after hearing from the rogue that all is clear would probably be close behind . Anyone trying to jump backwards has a long way to go , anyone trying to jump forward has a 5 foot wall in front of them now . For a really nasty touch make the force of the PC's hitting the pit floor the driver for some gears to close the flaps !! :D

Originally posted by kimokeo:

I like the pit-trap. However, there has to be a way passed it if it was constructed as part of someone's defense. How do they get passed if without falling for their own trap?

So, in your construction, the pits are always shifted to one side, meaning their is a walkway that is safe on an edge. Now, this pushes for a balance check (or a jump if they characters want to try that).

After a few of these traps, have two ledges on a couple traps. One ledge is safe. The other is not!

Towards the end of the adventure, the bypasses to the trap must change.

The key to this is to setup the rogue's expectation that the next trap is bypassed like the one before.

Another thing: Making characters bypass a trap that isn't a trap is funny... Make the pit a foot deep. They don't know that but make the trapdoors easy to spot. They'll think of all kinds of ways to bypass what really isn't a problem at all. (this works well with doors that don't open anywhere. There's just rock behind them. Could always put something behind the door to make noise just to make it interesting - or in the pit.)

Originally posted by pierow37:

the pillars of jumping.
a set of pillars is over a 250 foot hole in the ground. with spikes at the bottom. comved in knock out poisen. and ebola... well not really... but they're really dangerous spikes...
The pillars are 1 foot apart. and you enter a room with the tops of the pillars showing. when you jump on the first pillar it's all good. second pillar is an illusion. making you fall rite through it. so is the 4th, and 7th pillar.
They are such losers. the PC's must DIE!

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

I posted this trap on a thread similar to this one. It requires a bit of thinking on the PCs part.

4. The PCs enter the room, and a huge stone slab falls from the ceiling, trapping them in the room. The floor of the room is divided up into 5ft by 5ft tiles, except for where the PCs are standing. Each tile is also inscribed with a letter. Across the room, the PCs can see a door, and next to the door is a switch. Inscribed on the floor the PCs are standing, is a simple riddle in common. The PCs must spell out the answer by stepping on the tiles. If they step on a wrong tile, an arrow will shoot out of the wall (CR1 Basic Arrow Trap), a poisoned dart will shoot out of the wall (CR1 Poison Dart Trap), or a stone block will fall from the ceiling (CR1 Swinging Block Trap). The switch on the other side of the room will disable all the traps and raise the stone slab. Oh, did I mention that the letters on the tiles are in a language none of the PCs can read :D !

Originally posted by Richmud:

A few pit trap varients, oldies but goodies:

5. The reverse gravity pit trap: Put spikes above illusionary (or not, no one checks the ceiling) ceiling. Put permanet reverse gravity here so that victims go flying up into the spikes.(owner uses anti-magic field to walk through)

6. Double pit trap: Place two seperate pit traps next to each other so that somone leaping over one will land on the other.(owner flies)

7. wall pit trap: Anyone leaping over the pit strikes a wall (either made invisible through magic, being made of glasssteel, or being a wall of force). (used when no one intended to pass through)

edit: added numbers

Originally posted by pierow37:

I posted this trap on a thread similar to this one. It requires a bit of thinking on the PCs part.

4. The PCs enter the room, and a huge stone slab falls from the ceiling, trapping them in the room. The floor of the room is divided up into 5ft by 5ft tiles, except for where the PCs are standing. Each tile is also inscribed with a letter. Across the room, the PCs can see a door, and next to the door is a switch. Inscribed on the floor the PCs are standing, is a simple riddle in common. The PCs must spell out the answer by stepping on the tiles. If they step on a wrong tile, an arrow will shoot out of the wall (CR1 Basic Arrow Trap), a poisoned dart will shoot out of the wall (CR1 Poison Dart Trap), or a stone block will fall from the ceiling (CR1 Swinging Block Trap). The switch on the other side of the room will disable all the traps and raise the stone slab. Oh, did I mention that the letters on the tiles are in a language none of the PCs can read :D !
A langauge no one reads. My only guess is uncommon. I mean come on. It even says no one speaks it, in the name!

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

A langauge no one reads. My only guess is uncommon. I mean come on. It even says no one speaks it, in the name!
No. Just choose a language none of the PCs know. No Druid in the party, choose druidic. The PCs are a bunch of dwarves, choose elven. The PCs can still use Decipher Script (DC 25) or Comprehend Language.

Originally posted by kraleck:

Hmm, only 7 traps so far (and please number your traps, please)...in that case...

8. The PCs have to choose from (# of PCs +1) ropes to swing across a pit. All of the ropes appear sturdy, but only one will not break when somebody swings on it.

9. (variant of #8) More ropes are sturdy, but they ring bells to alert monsters in the room whose door is across the pit.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Sorry Kimokeo , i did forget to mention , this was a trap in a Dwarven tomb that was just a red herring , it led to a dead end . The smaller Dwarves , who would know about the trap , would cross those sections only one at a time and not set off the weight limit in the trap design if they ever needed to go that way . A little off topic but , somethinig i also used for that adventure was to have rooms with 2 secret doors . One door has a relatively low DC and is a red herring for grave robbers , the other DC is 3-5 points higher and is the real passage that the priests would have used .

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

More of a puzzle than a trap, really....

PC's enter a room, with two doors, one opposite them, and one they entered through.
On the floor are multi-coloured tiles (1 per PC) (make the tiles a geometric mixture of lots of different coloured triangles that criss-cross, and make each on different).
When the PC's exit the door opposite them it brings them back into the room through the door they came in.
Make sure you point out the significance of the tiles.
When PC's stand on them and move through, have some fun with them by bringing them back into the room in different orders, have PC's turn up five minutes later, etc.
The tiles have no significance whatsoever - the PC's can exit the room by going back out the door they came in.

Believe it or not, that kept my group going for an hour and a half.
At one point one was chopping a hole in the wall, and another was prying up the tiles from the floor.

:D

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

a trapped gold ingot with a sleep spell on it and a giant spider on the ceiling. this got a rogue in my party but tragiccally the cleric made us save him. he ha s since then gotten three party members killed (by a vat of hot oil he dropped on an opponent who was in melee with the fighter, by releasing a mummy and then running away and closing the door trapping the rest of the party in a confined space with it, and finally by su ndering the BBEGs wand of fireball.) fortunately, the last one killed him too

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

I'm not sure what number we're on, but I think it's...

11. The PC's Enter large round room, maybe 60' in diameter. Across the room is a stone door with a really tough lock. The Party's Rogue will have to pick it for a long time, or the fighters will have to beat it for a while before it crumbles.
The ground is made of sand, and the ceiling appears to be made of glass, the topside of which is covered in gold coins. This is how you find out who the greedy guy in your party is. It only takes one projectile from a crossbow, sling, bow, etc. to completely shatter the glass. The weight of the coins causes it to break further, and all under the glass (everyone in the room) must make a Reflex save of whatever the DM deems fair (
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)or take 3d6 damage from the falling glass. About two rounds after, while everyone is buzzing around picking up gold pieces, they realize the glass was not only holding back coins. A poisonous gas begins seeping down towards the ground, and every round their in it, they have to make a Fort save or fall unconscious. That could put some pressure on the guy trying to get the door open. If they just run back the way they came, the DM could make it so that the room can't be entered again, and now they have to take "the long way" around. :D

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

12.) The PC's enter a long hallway at a T-junction. There is a small step down into the hall, which appears to be about 70'-90' feet long and ten feet across. Down one end appears to be a dead in wall with a bunch of holes in it, down the other end appears to be a door. Once everyone is in the hallway, they here a grinding noise, and the floor starts to slowly move towards the dead end wall. They now notice the floor is made of rubber. The movement increases in speed until the PC's find themselves running. This is pretty much a big treadmill, and the wall with the holes in it now has spike sticking through them. Anyone who is taken into that wall will be impaled on the spikes for 5d6 damage (or however much you like.) In any case, the trick is to run as fast as you can, which could be difficult for heavily burdened or armed folk, and remember, you're only moving about 5-10
forward a turn. About ten feet in front of the door is a stone platform that
the players can jump onto for safety. For every round a PC remains on the treadmill, they have to roll a balance check of about 10 to stay on their feet. If they fail, then they lose about ten feet, and are that much more closer to the spikes.
There is a switch in the wall on the platform by the door that many will mistake to be the 'off' switch. The trick is the machine starts when all feet hit the rubber, and stop when all of them are off. Whoever hits the switch only reverses the direction of the treadmill, knocking everone still on it down and catapulting them onto the platform, perhaps breaking throught the door.
If you are the type of DM like I am, you will perhaps put some hulking bad guys on the other side of that door ready to hack & slash at the PC's who are out of breath and fatigued.
Have fun.
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Originally posted by kraleck:

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E. Ravenwood, you have created one of the greatest trap ideas ever.

Originally posted by isebas:

13.When they go into a room you could have a a trap door on the floor and when they step on it of course they fall in.But the best part of this is to have a portal in the bottom and one in the ceiling so they continuosly fall through the floor and come out the ceiling over and over again until the figure out a way to stop themselves.Actually happened to my cousin in the game Narbacular Drop where you make portals to get around this world while trying to get some bolders in place...well anyways its not an RPG but I think its a funny idea :evillaugh

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

Thank you very much Kraleck, I'm glad you enjoyed those two traps. A while back ago I came up with a list of good traps for a competition I never got around to entering in. The two traps of mine above are included in this list. Unfortunately I only have an un-editable version to put on here, so those two traps will be included, hope you don't mind, but it will totally be worth it...

Tricks and Traps

1: You’re pulling my chain...

The PC’s get to the end of a hall, and come upon a chain dangling from a hole in the ceiling and a smooth stone slab door. Written on the door is the message “A test of Strength Lies Beyond”. If your PC’s are smart, they will make it so their heavy hitters and fighters will be the first in the room for what lies ahead. The chain obviously opens the door, simply pulling down on it with a Strength Check of about 12 will open the door quite easily. Whoever grasps the chain will feel as though the metal links are wet.
When the chain is yoinked, the door is raised and the fighters rush in, ready for battle, but find a nearly empty room. The room is 100' long, and about 50' wide, and completely dark. There is a small step down through the threshold, leaving everyone standing in shin deep water. About thirty feet away, hanging from the ceiling, about five feet above the water, are two, fat, parallel metal bars, arcs of lightning bounce back and forth between them.
The PC’s will now hear a sickening, wooden crack. That was the ancient block and tackle system that allowed for such an easy Strength Check to lift a heavy stone door and two metal electrodes bursting into hundreds of pieces. The Strength Check to keep the door open and the electrodes in the air is now about 20 or higher. It should be noted that it is at about this point the PC holding the chain realizes his hands have been Sovereign Glued to the chain, and he cant let go. There are a few busted pillar pieces laying around inside the room the others could try to seek refuge on, but they would only allow one person to stay on. They could try to push these under the electrodes to keep them from breeching the water, but they weight about a ton a piece.
Another PC may go back through the door and help the other keep the chain pulled so that the electrodes and the door don’t plunge, but they too, will become glued to the chain.
If all else fails, and the PC holding the chain cannot keep the chain pulled down, all in the room are now trapped and will be electrocuted for 5d6 damage (or more >D) for every round the electrodes are in the water.
The trick is that at the end of the room sits a small table, and on it sits a tube of Universal Solvent with enough for one application. If the person can make it back to the door in time, they can fix the PC right up, unless of course, there are now two holding on to it.
Rather than just being a jerk, it might be a good idea to put a vast treasure in the room, give the PC’s reason to continue risking the chance of going back inside time after time.
If another PC is glues to the chain, it might be an entire side quest in itself to find a way to get him unstuck.

2: Run for Your Life...

The PC’s appear to step through a door in the middle of a very long hallway. There is a door to the left and a wall with spikes at the other end. If they venture out, they will note that the floor appears to made out of rubber. When the last person steps out onto the hallway, the party hears a low rumble then a whining noise. The floor suddenly begins to move towards the spiked wall. The PC's are basically on a large treadmill that begins pulling them

>------------------------|--|---------------------|----| 200' long
>------------------------------------------------------| Door
>-------------------------------------------------|----| 10' wide

towards danger. If thePC’s make a run for itthey will have to makea Balance check of 15 to ensure they stay on , their feet while running on the conveyer belt. If they fail, they fall and zoom towards the spiked wall at about 50 feet a round and must make a Balance check of 15 just to stand back up. They should also realize that though they maybe able to move at 4x their regular speed, they only move a few feet every round. The last ten feet of the hall towards the left is stone, and the PC’s must make a Jump check of 14 to make it onto the stone floor. Once there, there is a switch in the wall. If the players assume it is a stop switch, they are wrong.
Throwing the switch merely reverses the direction of the treadmill. If any are unfortunate enough to hit the spikes, they take 3d8 piercing damage, an evilly aligned DM might make them diseased or poisoned. They will remain on the spike and take an additional 1d8 damage every round until someone throws the switch. When that occurs, the PC’s remaining must make a Balance check of 30 or fall to the ground as they are suddenly pitched forward, and eventually shot off the treadmill. The conveyer will not actually stop until everyone is off. PC’s on the treadmill being hurled into the PC’s on the stone floor near the door will end up doing lots of bludgeoning damage to each other and probably break through the door too. An evil aligned DM might put a long, steep staircase on the other side of the door, or a room full of Orcs or Bugbears in the middle of evening chow.

3. Chimney Sweep...

The players come to a room with what looks like a chimney, which is in fact a tunnel leading up. It is about a 200 foot climb, but the chimney is studded with smooth stones for many foot and hand holds. The tunnel is narrow, so the players will have to go one at a time up the chimney. About halfway up, there is a trigger stone. Whoever trips the stone will afterwards be awarded a Concentration check of 20 to remember what the stone felt like. Rough, and sharp.
The trigger stone releases a spiked weight that is in place at the very top of the chimney, and causes it to fall at an alarming speed. Faster than the PC’s can climb down, and they will probably find that just letting go and falling is the fastest way down. If the players make a successful jump check, the first ten feet of the fall go by with no damage, otherwise, every other ten feet they fall is 1d6 worth of gravity damage. If they are hit by the weight, they take 4d8 piercing damage, and another 1d8 bludgeoning from the weight itself, not to mention they weight will knock them free from the tunnel, and they take whatever falling damage is left. If there are multiple people in the tunnel, it is likely that one falling will cause a chain reaction to cause a massive pile up at the bottom of the chimney.
The weight will stop with a jerk about 10 feet from the bottom of the tunnel, and then slowly crank back up to its usual position as the trap resets itself. Every player has about a 50% chance of triggering the trap, but if the person who tripped it can remember what the trigger stone felt like, and divulges this info to the rest of the party, that percentage drops to about 5%.
Even if the PC’s think they can scramble up the tunnel while the trap is resetting itself are sorely mistaken, for if the trigger is tripped, no matter where the weight is, it will fall, and then start back up.

4. People in glass houses...

The Adventurers enter a round room about 35 feet or so in diameter. The room is filled with sand and there is nothing too special about it, except that the door leading out of the room is heavy steel with a wickedly tough lock that looks as though it needs a key. The ceiling, about 40 feet above, appears to be made of glass, and sitting on this glass sits a vast quantity of gold, or platinum, depending on how good a mood you’re in. Any yahoo will figure out the easiest way to get the cash down is to throw something at it like a rock or a boot. Even a bolt from a crossbow will shatter the glass. All must make a reflex save of 12 to negate falling glass damage. Once that’s done, it’s like Cinco de Mayo when the pinata’s meet its fate.
However...
The glass separated the room from about another five feet of altitude. Contained in the portion above the glass was a poisonous gas that begins to seep down to the players in about 1d2 rounds. Hopefully someone’s been working on the door, because the look is going to take about a DC of 45 or 50 to open, or about five rounds of continuous 20 to 25's to open the sucker. The poison takes a Fort save of 18 every round to keep from taking 1d10 Wis and/or Int damage. The door you came through can let you out, but the gas will keep coming out until you’re outside. The only way to separate yourself from it is to get the hell through the sealing steel door. If your players lose this and all pass out, maybe you should have them all wake up a few days later in nothing but their skives. Maybe that will teach them to secure a way out before attempting a get-rich-quick scheme in the room. If you’re nice, maybe you can put the key to the door in with the gold or platinum that has fallen. Search check of 16 or so. Remember, if you’re taking 1d10 Wis and Int damage every round, it might start getting harder and harder to find that key.

5. Into the Meat Grinder

This is more of a trap to freak your PC’s out. Somewhere deep in a sadistic bastard’s dungeon,
make it so that the only way to continue is through a long, sharp angled chute. The room it sits in is about twenty by twenty, and the lip of the chute sticks about three or feet up into the air in the center of the room, surrounded by sand bags.
After two people have gone down, take that NPC that no one likes or you’ve been meaning to kill off and have him go next. The room the PC’s end up looks like the room they jumped down the chute in, the only difference is the chute is sticking out of a wall and not the floor. When the NPC hops down the others in the room hear a loud “ERRRRUM” and the NPC lands in the exit room in two halves length-wise. The PC’s will now freak out. The trick is that every third person that goes down causes a buzz saw to pop up in the middle of the slide about halfway down the chute. If the PC’s are smart, they will use the bags of sand to set the trigger off once they time it right.

6. He...could...go...all...the...’SPLAT’

This is more of a comical trap than anything that will cause damage. In a relatively short, narrow hallway, the floor is suddenly split by a five foot wide, ten foot across, and five foot deep pit. No problem. The first person who jumps across should have detected magic. About halfway across is an invisible wall. When the PC takes that running jump, he’ll hit that thing like a fly hitting a windshield, and then slowly slide down. The trick is to just climb down into the pit, walk under the wall, and climb up the other side. Hitting the wall with that running jump might cause 2d6 or so damage, but make it subdual, I mean, what are you, a jerk
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. O-o

7. Shredded PC

This is a good sadistic trap to put in a fighting arena. The room should be relatively large, and have lots of levels for fighting, with lots of cauldrons of burning tar for light, and other stuff. Put some heavy hitting enemies in the room, like some ogres or trolls. Ever some-odd feet, there is a five by five foot shaft. Falling in, or getting knocked into, rather, is a new level of pain all together. After good forty foot drop, the tunnel takes a 45 degree slope, and has protrusions in the surface much like a cheese grater. After so many feet of this (5d6 or 5d8 worth of damage) the player takes another vertical spill and lands in a forty by forty by five foot deep vat of salt water. This should probably just deal subdual damage, but it is very sadistic non the less. The only way he’s getting out is climb back out the way he went.

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Rock on my friends
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Originally posted by kraleck:

This thread has much potential that shouldn't be wasted...

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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Not so much a trap, but will cause your PCs to go mad.

A solid wooden (or metal) door with X number of locks on it (I made it 20). It took the rogue a while, but finally he had unlocked all the locks and opened the door. behind the door, a solid brick wall!

Good job I can run fast!

Originally posted by malcaor:

ravenwood, are you the jigsaw killer or something?

actaully a lot of the Saw traps would be good.

Originally posted by thinker89:

I am bumping this because i like it.

Originally posted by Richmud:

I am bumping this because i like it.
You really are supposed to wait 24 hours before bumping.

On a more relevent note:

22) Cloaker pit: A varient on the classic illusion pit have a cloaker hide in a pit with a darkness spell over it. Have the cloaker use its silent image ability to create an image of a foe, wait for char to fall in pit and be engulfed by cloaker. Should players figure it out have cloaker rise from pit and attack. (note cloaker needs to speak common to understand when players figure it out)

edit: numbered

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

Sorry I messed up the numbering, I think we're on number...

#23) The players enter a very wide, very long room, say 45 by 100 feet long, every 5 x 5 foot space of the floor all the way to the end alternates black and white, so you end up with a large checkerboard pattern. On the other side of this room sits a pedestal or alter that holds the lost relic or whatever your adventurers might be looking for.
Now, when I ran this trap, my PC's figured out what I at first planned the trap to be, one of the colors is rigged to set off a trap the moment someone stepped on it, so they bypassed it easily.
Later on in the campaign, I tried an alternate version of the trap, instead of just one color, I made it a bit nasty.
About twenty feet into the room is when the trapped floor begins, so most people suspect it's relatively safe when nothing has happened this far into the room. Now the fun begins. I flipped a coin to decide on the color, and which ever one you pick, this is how the trap works.
Let's say you picked white. The first white square a PC steps on immediatly sets the trap. If anyone steps on a square surrounding the PC who has set the trap, the square fires up into the air on a powerful spring, driving anyone on it straight into the ceiling for XdX amount of damage (whichever suits your fancy.) If you want to get real nasty, alternate the trapped color every round or so :D

Originally posted by kraleck:

A friend of mine designed this in a FPS game for a custom multiplayer level.

24. King Tut's Bad Joke - The PCs are being pursued closely by multiple enemies (hopefully stronger than them or an illusion). The PCs come to a twisting hall (so they cannot charge away) with doors on either side. Inside every door the room immediately drops 20 ft onto spikes as they enter. So named as it is in a pyramid/similar desert themed tomb.

Originally posted by kraleck:

I may be ~20 minutes early for this, but...

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Originally posted by kraleck:

Grr...
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

#25

The players enter a narrow hallway with a small staricase leading up to a large, decrative door. A spot check should tell a PC that the walls are covered in a slick, oily liquid, and their are large scrape marks all along the wall. The door is made of stone, and has no appearant keyhole. It is also stuck, so a strong brute character will have to pull it open. The strength check to open is 22 or higher, depending on what level your pc's are at. When this Stength check succeeds, the PC's will be in for a surprice. The entire wall the door is set in completely slides towards the PC's and continues towards them on the greased walls, and will continue down the stairs after them.
In the particular event I used this trap, I had put an open portcullis at the bottom of the stairs, and a pit to jump over. The Portcullis drops after so long, and if any of the PC's haven't cleared it, then they buy the farm. Or so they thought. The PC's who didn't make it fell into the pit, and the stone slab trapped door fell into the pit. Everyone assumed they had been squished. THey had actually falled down a funnel-like chute that dropped them into another part of the dungeon. It's a good way to split the party up if you need to.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

hehe - I just thought of an evil continuation for Ravenwood's trap. When the characters fall down the chute into another part of the dungeon, they find themselves in a room with no visible doors. when they land, the room starts filling with sand. xD they have to find the secret door in order to get out safely.

Originally posted by kraleck:

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Originally posted by kraleck:

*heavy sigh* Nobody cares...
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Originally posted by kargush:

Not sure about the number, but here goes:

The Flaming Rod:

The PCs enter a large room(say, 100x100 ft). They are standing on a small stair(sai a couple of feet high) The floor before them is covered with about a foot of oil. On the other side of the room is the exit, a large stone door. The PCs will ofcourse want to continue. However, as soon as they step into the oil, the door behind them closes(it's a large, heavy stone slab). From the ceiling, a torch starts to lower on a chain(ca 10 rounds before it hits the oil). The PC will scramble madly to get out. The doors leading out will each have a fiendinsh riddle on them, that must be solved, or a large number of difficult locks(or whatever).

And now, the trick: the torch is an everburning torch. It cannot, under any circumstances, light the oil... More of an annoyance than a trap really.

Originally posted by mtgfan101:

This may be an easy trap, but,

The players enter a room with a 25-foot ceiling, and a floor of 30-feet by 20 feet. Two levers are on the far wall. As soon as they enter the room, both doors bolt down and the PCs are trapped. Closer inspection on the levers reveals two traps, Wall Trap and Ceiling Trap respectively. (The room's exit walls are 20 feet apart, while the wall-trap walls are 30 feet apart.)

An inscription on the wall reads in Common: "Throw one switch and start the other." That is to say, if the players deactivate the Wall Trap, the Ceiling Trap automatically starts falling down to the floor, or vice-versa, where the two non-exit walls close in on each other. The doors do not open after a trap activates.

In the room there are many random items (You can change this list as much as you like):
-A Jar filled with beads
-A large Beam (approx 25 feet long)
-A chest containing sand
-Any other random items you choose (the more there are, the harder it is to figure out the trap.)

The Solution- put the beam straight-up from ceiling to floor. Then deactivate the wall trap. The ceiling trap will not fall down on the PCs, and the doors open.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Okay here is how this one works...The PC's enter a room that is filled with mirrors (this can be to kill or just annoy). When they do an impenatrable wall falls and shuts the door they entered. Now each one of the mirrors will show the person in it as beautiful or having the one thing they want the most. However when a PC touches the mirror (or multiple PC's at once) (they are breakable, but when broke the status affects as said below apply to the WHOLE party) they are instantly transported to the other side and the mirror used is gone. Only they are ugly or physically deformed [spine twists into a 360 loop, spleen explodes, tongue splits into 100ths, etc] (never mentally). So take away CHA, STR, DEX, and CON points here there and everywhere. If they don't find their way out they may be killed from ability drain. Eventually they may reach the other side of the room with the exit mirror. This mirror however will be the reflection of a wall (due to the reflections of the wall that fell in the beginning off of the other mirrors in the room. Once this mirror is touched or smashed all the PC's are reverted back to their stats they had when they first entered the room.

:evillaugh

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

The PC's enter a room and there is a pillar in the middle. Upon entering they may step on a pressure plate or trip wire that causes the exit door across the room to close. The pillar in the middle of the room however has a lever or button. Upon activating the 5 foot squares surrounding the pillar in an X open up (the lever pusher falls thru). Then iron bars swing above the trapped from the top of the pit out of the stone to seal them in. Then the pit starts to fill with a liquid of your choice (or if you are evil ochre jellies and slimes
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). Then the other PC's have up to 1d10 rounds to break the iron bars holding their comrade and get him out. Once the time is up the pit is full to the top with liquid and a Cone of Cold spell is cast multiple times upon the liquid. Effectively freezing the caught PC within a block of ice. This extra weight also sets off a pressure plate opening the exit door, but now how do you free the frozen PC? If you take him out the pressure drops and the door shuts again. :evillaugh :evillaugh :evillaugh

Originally posted by kraleck:

Wow...this thread is fighting to stay alive. CLEAR!!!

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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

I haven't read the entire thread and hope I'm not repeating anyone here.

This is one I used to kill off some of those greedy bastard players. They enter a room, filled with hordes of unimaginable treasure. The only thing between them and plunder it all is a pair of demonic looking wolves, engulfed in flames. The elemental creatures will not leave the piles of treasure they guard for any reason but will attack anyone who tries to come near the piles. If anyone pays attention they will notice the stench of oil filling this room, and that is what they are standing ankle deep in. Killing the wolves will cause them to fall to the ground, igniting the oil and burning away the hemp ropes that hold this rooms heavy iron porticullis up. The porticullus will slam down and trap everyone inside with the inferno. you can even go the Ninja Scroll route and have them become covered in molten gold, eventually cooling into statues of themselves.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

I think this will be #31: The door that bites back...

This is a good trap for those hulking fighters who never appreciate their rogues. The PC's approach a door that looks like heavy, reinforced, and strong, however, it appears to be made from very soft wood, like Balsa, or some other kind. Their are no visible key holes, or anything to pick as far as locks go, but the door appears to be stuck. This whole door is trapped, however, so the Rogue will be able to disable it if he finds it to be trapped. However, most fighter/barbarian types will probably just try to smash on through. In doing so, the moment a momentous force (ie, axe, sword, fists, etc) strike the door, the door will explode, sending shards of wooden fragments into the PC's. The PC who struck the door in the first place will take 3d6 piercing damage, people within 5 feet take 2d6, and people within 10 feet take 1d6, and those outside of that get to point and laugh at the splinter covered party.

32: The "Home Alone II" trap

Our brave and fearless PCs come to a door that is heavy reinforced wood. It does not appeared to be locked. However, when the knob is turned and pulled, there is a lot of resistance, like someone on the other side is pulling on the door also. The person pulling the door should roll a strength check of about 15 or so, and then everyone must make a listen check to hear distant rumbling getting closer. The door opens freely now, and anyone can see that it opens to a ramp leading up, and that a rope attached to the otherside of the door just pulled the support out from a large, round boulder, and now it's hurdling towards the PCs. This is really fun especially if they make a run for it, because the boulder take up all the space, so there's no getting around in, and in the campaign I ran when I put this in, the corridor leading to the door in the first place was really long, and on a slight grade, giving the boulder a never ending slope to role down.

33: The door of Confusion

This trap gave my PCs one hell of a time. It appears to be made completely out of glass and the PC's reflections show, so they can't see through it. Technically this is a mirror of opposition. The door only allows one person to go through at one time. When a PC goes through, he open the door, steps through and the door slams behind him. He has just entered a room facing the rest of his party. Wait for some "what the hell" 's to be murmured from the rest of the party but it goes like this.
There is a party just like you, but of completely opposite alignments. When one PC goes through the door, their member of the bizarro party, goes through too, and finds himself facing what looks like his party, while the PC is on the other side looking at what he thinks is his own party, but is really the Bizarro party. But they don't know that, and it is almost guarenteed that multiple PC's will go through the door, go back through the door, and so on, until they finally realize they're dealing with their opposites, and must fight (now would be a good time to drop hints about the opposing party being evil, or good, whichever...) And now you must fight, but they're so damn mixed up, nobody knows who's who anymore.
This is a very confusing trap, however, it works as a great encounter.

Party On, Dudes!
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Originally posted by doklahar:

34: Levers of Doom

As the PCs move into this 50ft by 50ft room, they can see that there is a door on the opposing wall, and that the ceiling is 20ft high. The ceiling and floor of this chambre are made of smooth stone, and the door on the opposing wall is made out of a stone. About 1/4 of the way up the wall is a ring of green metal, about 6 inches wide. On the sides of both doors (the one the pcs entered and the one on the opposing wall) are 2 levers, and there are 2 others, 1 on each of the other walls. These are painted Red, Blue, Yellow, Orange, Purple, and Black. Also, they are set at the same level as the green metal ring, breaking the ring into several peices along the wall.

The placement of the levers doesnt actually matter, nor do the order of the colors. But as all of the PCs move into the room, both of the doors shut and seal themselves, becoming completly unopenable. Also, the ceiling begins to slowly fall down, at about 1ft per round. The PCs should begin to panic at this point, and will notice the levers. Pulling these will not cause the ceiling to stop or rise, it will actually cause one of the following effects:

1: Causes the ceiling to fall faster, at 2ft per round instead of 1.
2: Causes holes in the ceiling to open up.
3: Causes spikes 1ft long to come out of the holes in 2
4: Engulfs the lever puller in flames, dealing 2d6 fire damage.
5: Gives the lever puller a short shock, dealing 1d6 electricity damage.
6: Force effect pushes lever puller back 10ft.

The answer to this trap is actually the ring of green metal. Touching the metal on each of the walls causes the ceiling to slop falling, and reverses the effects of 2 and 3 above. Running ones hands along the entire length of the metal ring causes the ceiling to return to normal height, along with unsealing the 2 doors.

For increased Evilness, you can swap out the effects of the levers with more devastating events, such as causing the room to be slowly filled with water.

Originally posted by kraleck:

Good work, contributors. Keep them coming.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Been thinking about this trap since I played Dungeon Siege II ...

35. (I Think) Players enter a room that is 20x20 or so. In the room is a handfull of torches on the walls, all lit, and a large tresure chest or sarcophagus (big enough to contain the nasty suprise). The chest is locked with a standard DC for the party, or you can even have them find the key. As soon as the chest is opened, the lid flies back and reveals a Gibbering Mouther. Once the monster is killed, the corpse can be moved to reveal a second door in the bottom of the chest that reveals the treasure.

Anyone who has played DSII knows that finding a Mimic protecting the treasure at the end of a quest is a real pain. This trap is particulary nasty if the party has already been beaten down by everything else in the dungeon.

And who says first time DMs can't be evil... [/sblock]

[sblock=Page 2] Originally posted by kraleck:

Only 35?!? Come on people, devise those clever traps!!!


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Originally posted by kraleck:


I really thought this thread would get farther than 35...


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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


36. Stairway to Pain
About halfway up a flight of steps is a false step. Its cover is made of brittle material, like disguised glass, and when stepped on with a certain weight shatters, and the PC's foot falls through. If he doesn't remove his foot carefully, and just pulls it on out, he'll relize his mistake, for there are spikes inside angled at about 45 degrees, so when his foot goes in, nothing happens, but when he tries to pull it out...have the PC take whatever damage you deem appropriate, but cut his base movement by half.


37. Psychololgy, thy name is fear
If anyone has ever seen "Raiders of the Lost Ark", when Dr. Jones is creeping through the booby trapped temple to take the golden idle head thingy, the prized relic sits on a pedestal at the end of the room, with a long walk towards it with many tiles that looke like they could be pressure plates, and lots of holes in the way that look like they could fire darts. I pulled this on my PC's one time, and though it wasn't trapped at all ( I did that once they got to the prize) it sure as hell made them suspicious. One thing you can also do to this trap is make it unarmed when they walk across, but all are armed once the relic, idle, whatever is removed from its pedestal. Since your PC's thought it was safe to walk across the first time, maybe they'll think they can just mosey on out.


38. The burning sensation means its working...
This is a spin to all you commonly used pit traps. It usually pays to have combat going on while you activate it.
THe PC's are fighting in a large circular rooms in a castle, fort, dungeon, HQ, etc, with big door leading in each cardnal direction. The room is about 50' in diameter and its full of rubbish. In the center of the room is a 20' diameter circle set into the floor. While fighting, if a lever is activate, whatever kind of trigger you want, opens the 20' area like a trap door. This is actually a garbage chute. After a good fall, they find why this is used as a garbage shute, because at the bottom is a huge gelatinous cube, err... cylander, and he's sopping up the goods, which include fallying PC's. Gravity ought to drive them pretty deep into the thing, and there's really only two ways to get a PC out of it. Kill it, or bungee jump into it and have the rest of the party haul you out (believe me, this option can work, I tried it once. It may sting a little though)


39. This one always makes me laugh
Its true, this is a trap I just use for comic relief. The PC's enter a room that appears to a have a rope dangling from the ceiling. upon further inspection, it appears to lead up through a hole in the ceiling into blackness. In a true case of curiosity killing the PC, if anyone attempts to climb the rope, their weight opens a trap door underneath them and snaps the rope. I usually put something good at the bottom of the pit, so the embaressed PC at least has something to show for instead of just a bruised butt.


40. Rollin, Rollin, Rollin...
In a 10' wide halway, make it pretty long, there appear to be pressure plates all along the floor. It looks as though who ever built the place didn't even go through the trouble of disguising them, and they are easily avoidable.
However, to tests ones greedy habits, ever so many feet down the hall is a platnum lever in the up position. They look really appealing, and a successful apraise check will show they are worth about 500 gp each.
They can break off with a strength check of 20, but if they miss the check there is a 50% chance they inadventantly threw the switch. Now it's time to see which of the part is the best sprinter.
A heavy thud echos through the hallway, and up the way they came, they can see three stone wheels, about the size of a modern day truck tire, rolling down the hallway, setting off all the pressure plates, sending up an array of traps from darts, arrows, gasses, acids, flames, etc.
Very effective, very mean, very...DM-esque!
:D


Originally posted by cryosilver:


The setup is incredibly simple on this one. The PCs are walking down a corridor, about 150 feet long.


About 50 feet down, there is a subjective gravity effect that points DOWN THE HALL. The first PC to reach it falls SIDEWAYS, into the door at the end of the hall, which is really just a painting on canvas (DC 20 to notice, but with a -10 penalty for being 100 feet away) over a stone wall with spikes.


DC to notice: 20, with the -10 penalty; +2 if the PCs notice that the tapestries in the hall have been nailed to the wall, so they hang straight down.


DC to disarm: N/A; dispelling negates the effect for 1d4 rounds, as normal.


Reflex save: DC 20 for half


Damage: 10d6 falling + 2d6 spikes; poisoned, if you're a real ass.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


# 42: The trapped treasure room...


This is better for a higher level party. After the PC's have butchered their way through the dungeon, they reach the treasure room which sits in a round 50' diameter with a stepped platform in the center that is 20' in diameter and raised about 2 feet. Every five feet or so placed around the treasure platform is a stone pillar that is about 10' off the ground with a life sized stone statue of a warrior on each one (8 total). The Platform is covered with treasure, coins of all kind are scattered on the floor so thick, you can't even see the floor, weapon racks full of exoticly designed and decorated weapons sit next to chests spilling with coins, jewels, gems and all kinds of art pieces. As the party begins to rumage through their new found treasure, the Statues spring to life, and will protect it at all costs.


Stone Treasure Guard (CR 10 each)
Medium Constuct
True Nuetral
AC:18 (10+6 natural +1 Dex +1 Deflection) Touch:12 Flat Footed:17
HP:125 (12HD) Speed: 20 feet
Immune like all Constructs
Fort:7 Ref:5 Will:3
Abilities: Str: 18 (+4) Dex: 12 (+1) Con: 14 (+2) Int: 8 (-1) Wis:12 (+1) Cha: 10
Feats: Weapon Focus* Weapon Specialization*
Melee: One of these Weapons
Longsword (+14/+9) 1d8+8 19-20/x2
Greatsword (+14/+9) 2d6+8 19-20/x2
Battle Axe (+14/+9) 1d8+8 20/x3
Long Spear (+14/+9) 1d8+9 20/x3
Long Bow (+11/+6) 1d8+2 20/x3
Heavy Crossbow (+11/+6) 1d10+2 19-20/x2
Halberd (+14/+9) 1d10+8 20/x3
Flacion (+14/+9) 2d4+8 18-20/x2
SQ: Stone Walk - these creatures are made of stone and can climb on any object made of stone no matter what the angle so long as one hand is free.
Damage Reduction 5/bludgeoning
*which ever is weilding the weapon, the guard has weapon focus and specialization to the appropriate weapon its carrying


If you want to scale it down a bit, you can lower the number of guards used, or tweak their stats, but I pulled these guys on my party one time when they were level 16. The party consisted of 9 people, including my PC, and was 2 Paladins, 2 Fighters, 1 Cleric, 1 Ranger, a Rouge (me :D ) a War Mage and a Warlock.
I had these stone buggers bouncing all over the walls, the ceiling, the pillars, and by the end of the fray we killed all eight after losing a paladin a cleric, and our ranger. That is why you do what I did and put something really good in the treasure horde, like a wand of "Heal", or a bunch of healing potions. I myself put a scroll true reserection in the horde, but I thought that was a little to easy. So I put the scroll in a cryptex (having just recently read "The Da Vinci Code") and the scroll would be destroyed if the cylander was not opened correctly. I put a lock on it instead of a key, I couldn't think of a good riddle. Anyway, if you go this way about it, you will need to drop a clue of the scroll's porperty, and they will have to sift through the treasure to find a key, which could take a while, the only time PC's will complain about having too much treasure.


Originally posted by kraleck:


This is still too cool to die yet...


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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


43) Magnetic Walls


This is a good trap for archers. The party enters a faily good sized room, maybe 40X40 or 50x50 feet. The walls are made of hewn stone, with small circlets of metal inlayed into the wall. When approached, PCs in metal armor will "fell the slightest of sensations of being pulled toward the wall" The circles of metal are magnets, which do not appear to be very strong. However, unload a couple of monsters into the room, and the Archers of the party will just see how it will screw with their game. After firing a bolt or arrow, the projectile will travel about 20' and then begin to very toward one of the walls, striking anyone who happens to be in the flight path, even one of the own party mates.


44) More fun with magnets


This one I used on while a group of PCs were approaching a known villians residence in a forest. It really messed with their minds.
As the PCs approached the house, there area was scattered with heavy stones. When the PCs came close to the rocks, the stones began to shake, and suddenly launched themselves at all wearing metal armor. The PCs thought that some sorcerous guard was playing tricks on them, but in fact the rocks were loadstones and placed around the residence to ward off intruders.


45) The Scales of Justice


When the PCs fall into a pit, simple enough to put one in your dungeon, have them land on a chute, and begin sliding. Then devid them equally according to WEIGHT, and split them up via a fork in the chute or something. They are dropped out on two hard slabs of stone suspended by chains, and are about 20 feet away from each other, and below them is a vat of bubbling lava. In front of them is a platform that each party can jump onto to stay alive, assuming they make an appropriate check which I will leave to you to decide, however, they are on a balanced scale, and as soon as weight on one slab is taken off, or added ( if possible ) the other will begine to sink closer and closer to the lava.
Shake things up by putting bad guys on the safety platform who don't realize that the party are on a balance, and have them jump onto the slabs to fight.
Warning, this could get messy, make sure your PCs have a back up character ready in case of accident ;)


Originally posted by bomaz:


evil:
gate in the end of a corridor, when you walk through it you fall into shaft say 100 ft deep. in the middle of the shaft is a permanent prismatic sphere. at the bottom is a gate leading to the top of the shaft


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


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Originally posted by arco_versipellis:


My players have come to hate the trap I developed. Take a regular pit trap and fill the bottom with waste (the grosser the better). In each corner of the pit there are tubes running from the bottom to the surface. Suspended above the pit is a vial of alchemist fire. When the trap is set off, the victim falls, followed by the alchemist fire. They land and take damage, then must save against the effects of alchemist fire; the tubes help keep air circulating so the waste keeps burning. Saves against naustiea as well.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


Acro, dude, that is the most @$%#-ing vile trap I've ever heard of...I'm totally using it :D


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


#48 Sticks and Stones...
This is a good trap for the token meathead tank of the party. The party enters a long, wide hall that has no traps visable at first. After walking about thirty feet, a thick, wooden beam fires out from one wall of the corridor into the next, and a message carved on the wood states "Break me, and ye' shall pass". The Tank will take a wack at it, the beam has a harness of 12, and hp of 20. Once broken, the PCs will walk another 30' down the hall, and a stone beam will shoot out the same size and dimension as the wooden one. The message now says "Is that all ye' got?" The tank will take the challenge, and try to smash through again. Stone beam has a harness of 16, and an hp of 30.
Another 30' down the hall, and a steel beam shoots out with the message, "C'mon ye' bonnie lass, try an' break this un'." Steel beam has a hardness of 20, and an hp of 45.
After this one, the party gets about fifty feet down the corridor, almost to the end, when a thin wooden pole shoots across the corridor with the message, "Go ahead, laddy, make my day"
The wooden pole has a harness of 8 and an hp of 5, but what the tank doesn't know is that this is a staff of pain. When he (or she) breaks it, the tank is hit with 'Inflict serious wounds' (3d6+11 negative energy damage, will22/half) 'Eyebite' (target becomes becomes panicked, sickend and comotose for 8 hours, will22/negate) and 'Wrack' (Renders the victim helpless with pain for 24 hours, will22/negate)
Very mean thing to do, that's why I suggest you use it.
P.S. - if a spell caster casts 'detect magic' the staff will illuminate, and can be extracted from the wall with a str.check of about 24 or so.


49. Immovable Rods of Falling...
This one is fun, and diverts that
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ed-off feeling your PCs feel towards you, and towards the player who set it off. At some point in the campaign, the PCs need to scale a wall that leads to somewhere important. In my campaign it was the BBEG's castle. Along one of the walls, they find a hidden ladder (spot of 18 to see) going up the wall. It appears to a mess of immovable rods that leads to the top (approx. 80-120 feet depending on just how sick and twisted you are) When they scale the rods, whoever reaches the top finds that on the top rung are written the words "Decido ut tui Excessum" (latin for : fall to you death...best to write these words down and give them to the PC) These just happen to be the command words to dispell the rods. If the PC utters these words, the PCs fall their various distances and take the appropriate damage resulting in pain, anger, and possibly death. On another note, the falling, screaming, crying of pain and frustration will most likely attract guards with big, scary bows.
Have fun :D


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


#50 Chinese Water Torture...cranked up a notch
The PC's enter a room that reveals quite a bit. When they enter the 30' wide X 60' long room, they notice immediatly that the walls and ceiling are made of glass, and just outside is water, with an abundance of creatures and stuff floating around. Put some bad guys in the room who ain't too smart (ie orcs, goblins, whatever) and have them attack the party. Fighting will have to be done so carefully, because the glass on has a hardness of 2, and an hp of 1 (I could be wrong, whatever it is in the PHB.)
Once the glass is struck (easly casued by poorly aimed projectiles) water will start gushing into the room, and let some of the creatures in too. Try not to make a whole panel give out, but enough to make the PC's need to rush to the other door and hold their breath.


Originally posted by isebas:


51.This one would be especially good for a group with alot of greedy pcs in it.When the pcs are in a dungeon...have the see at the end of a hall a large room filled with treasure(explain its contents alot...the juicier the better) looking like its going to overflow.There's a pathway leading to a giant gold statue and it looks like there might be adjoining rooms.Make it so they can see a couple of goblin gaurds or maybe some kobolds or any low lvl monsters, but to put only a couple in.Then they go running into it and the monsters disappear.They think they are in the room but actually they are in a giant pool of quicksand but instead of drowning they just sink to the bottom and are transported to another dungeon 200 miles or so away.


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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


The Halfling Trap:
More of a category than a specific trap, this one consists of an irresistable dungeon feature, such as a lever, button, crank, or winch that does nothing but activate some nastiness on the person who uses it. 99% of the time adventurers will use such things just to see what happens...


Originally posted by horemheb442:


I was drafted during the end of the Vietnam war and will always remember the mock Viet Cong village they took us through in target detection in basic training. Some of the simplest, nastiest traps I have ever seen, and they were real.


#54 Paddle trap. On a trail or in a narrow hall are two 2'x2'x3' holes about 18" apart. there is a shallow trough between then on which is laid a strong pole with two spiked paddles on it.Spikes up. This is all slightly below the surface and is well disguised. The unsuspecting individual steps into the first hole (from either direction) and falls in, impailing their foot and causing the paddle to pivot forcefully and impact @ 3' up from the foot. (ie: belly, crotch, face for a halfling or dwarf) The spikes were usually poisoned, as well.


#55 Trail Sweeper. There is a trail or hallway with a curve or turn in it. It should be fairly narrow (5' or less) and works particularly well on bridges. In a variation of the "Daisy Chain", the person at the head of the party triggers a large, heavy spiked ball suspended by a rope or chain from about halfway down the bridge or this part of the trail. It will sweep a bridge clean, often only leaving the lead and trailing people. You might be able to avoid it with a dive to your belly. (Reaction roll) The turn because that is where the ball is attached, waiting to work.


#56 Daisy Chain. There are a line of flasks, containing oil, Greek fire, etc. They start about 15' from the trip wire. The "scout" sets it off, the flasks are ignited and explode, damaging everyone but him.


#57 When is a trap not a trap? The party finds a room that is empty, but has a web of silvery metal embedded in the floor. The "security specialist" or the whole party, go in to investigate, only to find themselves naked after a short time. This is actually a teleport room for inanimate objects to another deeper layer of the dungeon, but trying to get there or out while scrounging weapons and armor can give a whole new appreciation for what you had and for teamwork.Might help to explain what that 18 charisma is really about, too.


Originally posted by kraleck:


48. Sticks and Stones...
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49. Immovable Rods of Falling...
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I am so using these, Quantrill. You must be some sort of insane genius to come up with these.
Moving on...


58. The PCs come to a room with a mirrored wall with spikes at the other side. If the PCs succeed at a simple Spot check, they will notice an inscription above the door they came in reflected in the mirror. The PCs will be unable to read the reflected writing and will have to turn around. Doing so will close and magically seal off the door. The solid wall that was once the door now moves 5ft per round towards the spikes and is deactivated by casting Shatter or a Sonic based spell that inflicts at least 5 points of damage while facing the mirror (the mirrored wall and spikes are all made of glass). Doing so reveals the exit beyond the glass wall. The exit puts them back in the place they were before the room.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Okay here is how this one works...The PC's enter a room that is filled with mirrors (this can be to kill or just annoy). When they do an impenatrable wall falls and shuts the door they entered. Now each one of the mirrors will show the person in it as beautiful or having the one thing they want the most. However when a PC touches the mirror (or multiple PC's at once) (they are breakable, but when broke the status affects as said below apply to the WHOLE party) they are instantly transported to the other side and the mirror used is gone. Only they are ugly or physically deformed [spine twists into a 360 loop, spleen explodes, tongue splits into 100ths, etc] (never mentally). So take away CHA, STR, DEX, and CON points here there and everywhere. If they don't find their way out they may be killed from ability drain. Eventually they may reach the other side of the room with the exit mirror. This mirror however will be the reflection of a wall (due to the reflections of the wall that fell in the beginning off of the other mirrors in the room. Once this mirror is touched or smashed all the PC's are reverted back to their stats they had when they first entered the room.


:evillaugh
Did you read a book about a kid who goes into this theme park to save his little brother and the rides or funhouses become killer. Because I remember a book by like, I dunno, but I read a bunch of his books, and this was one of the traps.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


this my trap i made up:


treasure is surrounded by tables and the tables have spikes under them. the only way to get to the treasure is to walk on the tables. what you want is greedy pcs to immediatly (sp?) jump on the tables and to the treasure. the tables have a spell on it that causes the player to dance uncontrollably(lol). the table then breaks after 2 rounds and the pc will fall onto the spikes. the spikes will then give way and the pc will fall down a pit with more spikes, which leads to another pit with more spikes etc. if the pcs make it to the treasure have be an illusion covering a pit with spikes that leads to another pit with spikes which leads to... well you get the idea.:pile:


edit: added number


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


# 60 The Dead Man's Switch
The PC's find a spot that looks promising for a search for traps (a door is best). When the rogue is done, he will have found that the trap is (flaming, acidic, gasious, etc.) and is tripped by motion detection as soon as the door is open, which means he has to open the door to disarm it, but everyone in a 10' spread on either side of the door has to be really still. However, as soon as the rogue pops the door open, the party sees on the other side a really hungry, growling (owl-bear, dire bear, displacer beast, etc), and he lunges towards the party. If the party flees they'll set off the trap, but the hungry beast will set it off anyway...what to do?
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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


#61


The party has to walk up a very long, pretty steeply sloping corridor. At the bottom, they have to jump over a pit to continue up the corridor. At the top there's a large door. When opened, the party sees a steel ball rumbling and rolling towards them, picking up speed.


The party I DM'd this for assumed that the ball would fall into the pit, so they had to make it there, jump it, and let the ball fall in. In matter of fact, there's a one-way wall of force midway above the pit, triggered by the trap and lasting as long as it takes for the ball to get to the pit.


Going hell-for-leather down a sharp incline, your PC's are moving at a fair old clip, and the leap into a wall kinda hurts the first guy there. The PCs coming behind him need to make Reflex saves, otherwise they are unable to stop themselves and rocket straight into the pit as well.


Feel free to populate the pit with additional dressings as you see fit; spikes, gelatinous cubes, toy-poodles, etc.


Solution? The rolling ball is an illusion.


(For true nastiness, have two traps like this (one after another) and then a third trap with no wall of force and a Real ball.)


#62


Tired of PC's who look through keyholes to see what lies ahead? Simple solution; there's an invisible needle sticking out of This particular keyhole, and they just impaled their eye on it. Poison to taste.


Originally posted by kraleck:


Did anybody else get the heebie-jeebies from #62.


Originally posted by horemheb442:


#62 There is a massive door, usually of bronze with thick steel banding on it and a very intricate lock...maybe a two tumbler one so it must be picked twice. No traps detectible on the lock. The door is a 1000lb dummy with very strong steel springs behind it. The only thing keeping the door from crashing at high velosity onto the solid stone floor is the lock...and since the door is the trap, the lock detects as clean. 5d10 damage...at least:evillaugh


#63 Caught up in the moment. If anyone out there has had barbed wire fencing break as you were installing it, this will sound familiar. Several grooves in the floor containing very high tension and brittle barbed wire or razor wire or some combination.When stepped on, it breaks, slashing the lower leg and foot and binding them in painful bonds. Any struggle inflicts more damage. 3d6 + 3 for every round of struggle. Must be cut away to get out of it. High hard boots may defeat it, but soft boots only diminish it and sandles or barefoot take full damage.


Originally posted by horemheb442:


#64 The Hairy Nude Thing This isn't a trap so much as it doesn't do damage but is good for comic relief after they've been pounded on by all these other traps and assorted bad guys.They come into a hallway 240 feet long and straight ahead of them. It is very well lit with torches or magic and there is a door at the far end, easiliy visible from this end. As they hit about 120 ft. in, the door they are facing bursts open and a 3'tall hairy creature rather like a longer legged, bipedal oragutan come careening toward them at a movement of 24. It runs through the party at velocity, screaming unitelligibly, and flees out of the door they just left, slamming it behnd him. The typical response from the party is "What the heck was that!?". To which you say, with as straight a face as you can, "That...was a hairy nude thing."


Originally posted by kraleck:


The next is actually #66.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


#66


The tree sling trap. A giant or some creature of great strength bends down a large, thin tree to the ground, and holds it down with a stake. He ties a rope to the top of the tree and makes a loop with the rope on the ground, putting a shiny sword in the center of it. He also attaches a rope to the stake. He takes the other end of the rope attached to the stake, and hides in some nearby foliage. When the adventurer sees the obvious trap and decides to give a try for comedy purposes, make them make a reflex save of 20 to avoid getting launched by the trap when the crafty fellow who made it pulls out the stake. Roll a d20+5 to see how far they get launched (each 1 being equal to 10 feet), the damage being done upon hitting the ground being a d6 for every 10 feet launched.


Originally posted by kimokeo:


67. The characters find a long iron chain dangling through a hole in the ceiling. As they climb to look above they find a large giant holding the other end of the chain. The giant smiles as he takes his end of the chain in his gloved hands and placed the chains' three-pronged end into three holes in the wall.


BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


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BUMP
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


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BUMP
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I wish I could do more than bump this, but I'm starting to run out of ideas
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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


My own personal favorite is the one which gets used on the player who utterly refuses to take part in the game, acting precisely the way to destroy whatever mood the rest of the group wants.


It consists of a perfectly round room, surrounded on the outside by a layer of nearly frictionless slime between the room and the external sphere in the stone. The player wishing to disrupt things is often delivered into it by a chute of some sort, which expels the player with sufficient force to make the sphere begin to turn...


...Taking the hapless player into the Reverse Gravity field on the far half of the sphere. Gravity, now reversed, takes hold and causes the playe to impact on the other side, turning it a bit faster as they cross back over to the normal side. It repeats, the room spinning faster each time, until a terminal velocity with an acceleration force roughly equal to, say, fifty Gs is attained, leaving the errant player smeared into a thin film across the inside of the sphere. It works wonderfully for removing munchkins from the game.


The way to get out alive? Tumble checks, reflex saves, or some sort of other way to keep balanced in the middle zone; eventually the slime's natural friction will slow the sphere to a halt, and perhaps allow for a 'secret exit' to be found.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


My own personal favorite is the one which gets used on the player who utterly refuses to take part in the game, acting precisely the way to destroy whatever mood the rest of the group wants.


It consists of a perfectly round room, surrounded on the outside by a layer of nearly frictionless slime between the room and the external sphere in the stone. The player wishing to disrupt things is often delivered into it by a chute of some sort, which expels the player with sufficient force to make the sphere begin to turn...


...Taking the hapless player into the Reverse Gravity field on the far half of the sphere. Gravity, now reversed, takes hold and causes the playe to impact on the other side, turning it a bit faster as they cross back over to the normal side. It repeats, the room spinning faster each time, until a terminal velocity with an acceleration force roughly equal to, say, fifty Gs is attained, leaving the errant player smeared into a thin film across the inside of the sphere. It works wonderfully for removing munchkins from the game.


The way to get out alive? Tumble checks, reflex saves, or some sort of other way to keep balanced in the middle zone; eventually the slime's natural friction will slow the sphere to a halt, and perhaps allow for a 'secret exit' to be found.
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what a way to die i would not want to play in your party


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


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what a way to die i would not want to play in your party
I've never had to use it.


And I reserve it solely for that one player who is so horrible that he wrecks the entire game for everyone. You know the type - he draws his sword on every commoner, picks fights with every guard, steals from his fellow players, and generally behaves as if he thinks the game world functions for his pleasure alone.


Yeah, that guy.


He gets fed to that trap.


Everyone else just learns to run away screaming anytime they see a kobold. ;)


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


I've never had to use it.


And I reserve it solely for that one player who is so horrible that he wrecks the entire game for everyone. You know the type - he draws his sword on every commoner, picks fights with every guard, steals from his fellow players, and generally behaves as if he thinks the game world functions for his pleasure alone.


Yeah, that guy.


He gets fed to that trap.


Everyone else just learns to run away screaming anytime they see a kobold. ;)
Oh well thats a good reason.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


#68 Kobold Kamakazi
This trap works best on low level henchman, like kobolds or goblins, or something of the like. They are all wearing these vibrant red medallions that the party will truly want ( because they're greedy, duh) but what they do not realize that these kabolds are fanatics and will stop at nothing to prevent the party from taking another step in their dungeon. When the fight begins to sway in favor of the party, the kobolds will lead a charge into the party, all striking their medallions before they hit. The medallions explode, dealing
2d6 damage to everyone withing 5' of the explosion, which doesn't sound like much, but when you have a few dozen go off around the PC's, that's a lot of damage. Another thing, one explosion will trigger the others, so even the dead kobold's charges go off too.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


First off: Ravenwood, I love you.


Second off: My friend was dming and our party was chased into a room with giant boulders flying in every direction through it. We had a bag of tricks, and as per our standard M.O. at that point, launched a rhino into it. Well, the boulders turned out to be an illusion that was real if it was believed in (poor rhino never stood a chance), but what was actually there were the funny gravitational fields. We ended up dispelling a laaarge radius in a panic and killed some of his other traps, but we almost ran straight through because of the whatevertheyweres behind us. We were a little more cautious afterwords because of the graphic detail in which the DM described the fate of the rhino
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Third ....
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... i love threads like this
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Originally posted by kraleck:


69. Stonecarvers are B******s...
The PCs enter a room with a stone sign with "Leave now or die" carved into it and two piles of keys on chains in the far corners. The full traveling party entering activates a symbol of death in the hall before this room. The PCs are allowed mandatory search checks to notice that the "or" has been hastily and sloppily carved with very few stone chippings at the base of the sign (the sign originally said "Leave now and die"). The sign has two keyholes on the back that require a key from each pile to deactivate the symbol, but doing so causes the PCs to take a long hike through an old, yet newly opened, long, winding tunnel to get back to the hall when the door gets permanently sealed off.


70. The Old Switcheroo...
The PCs must throw switches (three settings: up, down, and neutral (or straight out in other words)) in a certain combination to open the doors in the area. The combinations cause all other doors to lock including the one for this room. The trick to this place is that all of the rooms are connected (in communication only) by mirrors that look from this room into other rooms and from other rooms into the switch room. One person must stay in the switch room to throw switches while his buddies loot the place. The switch combination that opens the switch room door also opens the exit door (so that the party cannot screw the switch thrower out of his share of treasure).


71. The New Switcheroo...
As "The Old Switcheroo" except there are monsters locked in the rooms and each new combination also throws a nasty monster or two at anyone in the switch room to take out before they can throw the next switch. If the switch throwers die fighting the monsters, the PCs (dead and alive) are teleported out of the dungeon and the doors reset, which allows the monster(s) that killed Mr. Switch to escape to attack the PCs.


Originally posted by stevetom:


i heard of this one somewhere


72.
in any dungeon, there is a door that isnt trapped or stuck, that the rogue cannot tell, at least. the door itself is not trapped, but when a player goes to open it, a fist(as a bigby's spell) on the other side slams the first person to open the door with as much damage you deem appropriate; i use 8d6. reflex save to take half damage and not fly back 10 feet(another 1d6). once the hand finishes the attack, it then grabs the door handle and slams it shut(trap reset), leaving the party wondering what just happened
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if any PC is smart or courteous enough to knock, the hand immediately opens the door and lets the party past.
any other subsequent tries to open the door in an unrespectful manner will result in the trap being sprung


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


These are simple variations on pit traps that are designed to get the PCs who think that if a pit doesn't end in a wall of force, its safe.


73. In a Hallway (or anywhere really) there is a seemingly normal pit trap spanning an easy distance, say 10ft. Now after going through all the normal things to see if its OK (throw a hafling to see if there is a well of force and the like). Then when they try to jump over it, it turns out that the space just before it was rigged to drop them into the same pit... of whatever evil thing you can come up with (look to E.Ravenwood, for he is awesome at this stuff). You can also put it on the other side so when they jump to safety they fall into the pit instead (should probably offer reflex saves to grab the ledge or something)


74. Another simple pit trap. Have two or three pits that are easy to jump over, but the first one have a spring loaded section just before the drop off that wouldn't drop the PCs in (unless in heavy armor) but instead be made to help them jump a bit higher... unexpectedly. if they fail, they might over shoot there intended target and fall right into the next pit which is filled with something painfull.


Originally posted by kraleck:


75. Log Press...
The PCs are travelling through the forest when they come across an obvious tripwire. If the PCs simply jump over it, they trip a second wire that causes a large branch to smack them in the face (allow a Reflex Save to avoid, deal damage as a one-step-larger sized creature wielding a Club). The force of the branch causes them to stumble back and set off the first wire (the branch does not knock them prone). Now imagine that scene in Return of the Jedi where the AT-ST gets squished by two swinging logs. Effectively that happens.


76. Ogre's Vampire-Bane Fist...
With a door similar to #72, the PC who opens the door gets a large, sharpened, and spring-loaded log lodged into their chest if they cannot make a Reflex save. If they miss the Save on a roll of 1, they die. Otherwise, deal damage as a Lance wielded by an unmounted creature two-steps-larger in size.


77. Low Blow Machine...
Four PCs come across a cubic pedestal with a button on top labelled "Press to Open." When all of the PCs are inside, the door shuts and four pressure plates rise at the four sides of the pedestal. If the PCs stand on the pressure plates and press the button, two metal rods bash each of them in the legs (deals damage as two Quarterstaff hits, Reflex to avoid, failure reduces their speed by 10 feet and gives them a -2 penalty on the upcoming Reflex Save) followed by larger metal rods to the groin (deals damage as a Club, Reflex to avoid damage, failure induces a Fortitude save to avoid being stunned, sickened, and becoming unconscious from the excruciating pain). If the PCs inspect the door, they find that it only shut, it didn't lock.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


78. Break on Through...
This is a good trap for the meathead of the party (as so many of these traps seem to target) But a heavy door in the wall of the castle your PC's are traveling through that leads to...nowhere. The door is set into the wall, and is unopenable (word?
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?) When the hefty dude (or dudette) of the party tries to open it the old fashioned way, via a foot through the thing, the door gives way, and the PC needs to role a balance check, or fall out the side of the castle wall. Works particularly well on towers that are pretty dern high:D
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[sblock=Page 3] Originally posted by kraleck:

Just read #78. E. Ravenwood, you are a super genius.


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


Ravenwood, You are one sadistic human being.


Teach me. :p


anyway,


79. A long hallway in a dwarven mine, with numerous lines along the side walls. A spot check could reveal one of these lines is actually a long slit in the wall. The trap is triggered by pressure of any creature. When triggered, Large, scythe like blades come out of the walls and race down the hallway, towards the party. Every character medium or larger must then make a reflex safe to dodge or take XdX damage.
The dwarves who designed this trap could just walk underneath it.


80. A single 20 by 20 ft room, which is very high (adjust according to PC level), with a Teleport circle which is activated by stepping in it. It is targetted at the roof of this same room. PC steps in room, PC gets teleported to roof and falls, PC hits Circle, repeat as often as sadistic desires warrant.


Originally posted by kraleck:


81. Jars, Jars Everywhere and in One a Sweet Surprise...
The room across the hall from the trap room is locked and has a Magic Mouth cast on its door. The door tells them that the key is hidden in the room across from it. The trap room is filled with thousands of jars. Some of the jars have interesting (possibly deadly) gases trapped inside them, others have deadly vermin, and still others have caustic liquids. One of the jars has a sweet caramel-popcorn-peanut mixture and a ring inside. Putting the ring on brings every physical ability score to 3 (but the wearer doesn't get this physical handicap outside of combat), but heals all lethal damage (this healing only occurs once to each person). The ring has a Knock spell that is limited to the door across the hall. The snack mixture will sustain the PCs for 2-3 meals alone, but will make them ill if they do not eat any other food. Other food stretches this to 4-6 meals.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


Not sure if these have been mentioned, but I have two ideas.


1: A book that holds some information that is important for the adventure, which must be read. 'cept it's written in EXPLOSIVE RUNES. How to read it you ask? trap yerself in otiluke's res sphere or some such, and flip the pages with telekinesis.(there, and you thought raven was sadistic? :evillaugh
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)


2: quite simply, a pit trap with a teleport tile at the bottom,which teleports you to a metre or so above the pit, for an infinite fall loop:D .).


Comments will be appreciated.


EDIT: Doh! sorry, just noticed number 80, my trap is in no way a rip off of that, which I only just saw now. Sorry!


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Flames of Passage


Okay, PCs enter a room, and the door seals shut behind them. In the center of the room is a 10x10 water-filled hole. The PCs figure that they are supposed to swim to the next area, so they jump in...


and fall right through the water, and the water dissapears after just a few feet, and then the real thing happens:


The PCs hurtle downwards, and splash into the pit of lava, taking 20D6 points of fire damage for submersion, not to mention about 6D6 points of falling damage, for average damage of roughly 78.


For a lower level version, you can fill the pit with acid or spikes instead.


:evillaugh :evillaugh :evillaugh

The Ogre's Call



This can turn a wussy CR 5 ogre into a challenge that can slay a high-level character.
Okay, the set up:
Ogre: Rogue 2, 8 ranks in balance, improved bull rush feat.
Bridge: Suspended over lava/acid, a rope bridge [Literally-it is made out of ropes separated about 2 feet from each other.] Requires a DC 15 balance check to stay on while moving or if the bridge moves.
The Action: The ogre bull rushes the poor PCs into the lava, nailing them with 20D6 points of fire damage. The ogre could also shake the bridge from the end, forcing balance checks from the PCs.


The Black Lotus Garden
Possibly one of my favorite traps, the Black Lotus Garden is a 20 ft. deep, camoflauged pit filled with a version of black lotus extract that is a contact poison. If you fall into this pit, you take falling damage AND you take 6-36 points of constitution damage. EVIL!


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


First off, Kralek, Alcari Ambaron, you are too kind,


#87 Tempted by the Fruit...
This trap works particularly well when your PC's have ran out of food and are near eating thier boots. Deep in enemy territory, they come across a large, wide crevace that runs pretty deep, with steep slopes on either side. The surface they stant in is thick with foliage and lots of little cavelings and nooks for shelter, and better yet, trees with fruit on them. The starving party will want these immediatly, but make them roll a spot check when they see the fruit to begin with. If they made the spot check (DC 15-18) they see that the fruit appears to be pineapples.
This SHOULD make them think. pineapples don't grow on trees, something is awry, but in my campaign, they were to hungry to ask questions and shook the tree until the fruit came down.
This is a booby trap that the enemy has set up in this small grove. The Pineapples are actually bombs (pineapple grenades...get it!) and when they are shaken loose, and hit the ground, or the PC's, they explode. In my campaign, I actually made these like flash-bangs, where the PC was blinded and deafened for 2d6 rounds with a Reflex save of 15 to cut rounds blind and deaf in half, rounding up. This doubled as an alarm, and enemy troops heard the comotion, and a fight insued. The fact they were on top of the ridge, and above the PC's didn't hepl them any either.


#88 Bridge over troubled Water...
This is a reverse drawbridge, and by that, I mean instead of it raising up, and keeping you from going up the incline, it drops to a 45 degree and and dumps you into the moat, cavern, etc. I pulled this on my PC's one time when they were raiding a keep that was set up on a sliver of cliff off a platue, so the only way to get to the keep, other than the bridge, was to scale down the two hundred foot cliff face and then back up. The PC's and their NPC's were already fighting on the bridge, when they saw the men in the gate house go for the winch. They assumed that since they were already on the bridge, they either couldn't lift the bridge due to the weight of the people one it, or the rising bridge would just knock them into the fort. What they didn't expect was for the bridge to just drop, and dump everybody down into the gulch, killing all the NPC's and two PC's (200 foot falls tend to do that) The PC's can roll a reflex of about 13 to hold onto something, and then what do they do? My PC's tried to climb back up, under fire from archers on the crenals of the keep. They didn't like me too much after words...
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Oh well!


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


78. Break on Through...
This is a good trap for the meathead of the party (as so many of these traps seem to target) But a heavy door in the wall of the castle your PC's are traveling through that leads to...nowhere. The door is set into the wall, and is unopenable (word?
confused.gif
?) When the hefty dude (or dudette) of the party tries to open it the old fashioned way, via a foot through the thing, the door gives way, and the PC needs to role a balance check, or fall out the side of the castle wall. Works particularly well on towers that are pretty dern high:D
Another good one is a door where it has two parts; the inside of the door is hollow, and the inside edge of the door - the one that a door-kicker's foot will make contact with forcefully - is covered in sharp spikes. The effect is a lot like stepping on a whole bunch of caltrops at once.


Alternatively, you can fill said hollow door with poisonous gas, or an 'ignite in contact with air' liquid. A rogue still has a chance to find it, but the trap isn't connected to the door's lock, and serves only to punish people who like to kick doors down, so it likely has a fairly high DC...


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


89. a room about 20x30. Place a looping fall trap but with a cruel suprise, blade barrier sits 1O feet above the tely circle. Repeat until the consistancy meats your liking or a Ref save to stop the blender. The hole 5x5, that should be ok for reach. Depth 30. 3 are the room


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Not so much a trap as it is an interesting battlefield, but here goes.


#90. The PCs enter a room, about 50' by 50' square, with doors at either end. Standing in the center is a large half-orc chap with spiked full plate and as many levels in Fighter as you deem necessary. He holds a greatsword in front of him, with it's tip on the floor and his hands resting on the hilt, as if it were a cane. Behind him is the room's only light source, a large brazier which gives him a spooky silhouette effect. When the PCs are all in the room, he taps the tip of his sword against the ground, and suddenly the walls, doors, and celing all crumble away, and the PCs get the feeling that they are in a cavern of immense size, though everything farther than fifty feet from the brazier is shrouded in darkness. The fighter type then charges away from the PCs and disappears into the darkness. Have all the PCs make a Listen check to notice the fighter, who comes charging out of the darkness behind them and takes a swing at the mage/bard/squishey type in back. He might even do sneak attack damage if you give him rouge levels
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.


Here's the trick. The walls are still there, but they're hidden in an illusion, and the entire room is ringed with Teleportation Circles that lead to the opposite end of the room. Remember that retro video game Asteroids, where you could fly off the edge of the screen and reappear on the other side? This is the same thing. You can go through one of the teleports and attack an enemey who *thinks* he's a safe distance from you. Also, anyone who misses with a ranged weapon has to make a reflex save to avoid being hit in the back by his own bolt/arrow/magic ray/etc.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


I lose
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Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


here's for bumpage:


1: An iron golem in an oil covered room, with an Iron golem that casts heat metal on itself on death by means of a contingency spell. At that point, the doors slam shut. Basically, fly or something until the flames burn out, or smash the wooden doors. Similar to the wolves, but I only have an int score of -18, so leave me be.


2: same as the immovable rod one, but the writing at the top, instead of a code, is explosive runes. The shock will prolly make you fall anyway:D .


Oh, and sticks and stones/number 72 are beautiful
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Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


Oh alright, here's another one... yet another teleport trap.


You see, there's this arrow/bullet/stone/RPG/whathaveyou that flies at you when you step on a pressure plate, it will either miss you or go right through you. It will then hit the wall behind you, and teleport back to the original place, before flying at you again.


EDIT: another one, the standard locked door with the ceiling coming down(spike to taste), 'cept that when you go in, it activates the lvl 8 otto's irresistable dance spell on the whole party:evillaugh


ze equation: stone ceiling coming down+
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=
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I have to beat the big R in the sky!*steps on a pressure plate and sees bigby's clenched fist fall from the sky* I didn't mean that, you know!AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH!!!*splat*:p


Oh, and before I forget... le bump de grande, or whatever
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secret note: psst! did I win yet?:p


Originally posted by boozerker:


#91: Yank and Fall Backwards.


The PCs arrive at a door (pretty sturdy, high DC to break down). They make a strength check (first roll) to pull its handle, but it pulls back harder and sinks further into the door. So now the PC must beat that first roll in order to pull the handle out again (yet it pulls inward once more); repeat. For example, if the PC's first roll is a 14, then the next attempt needs a 15 or higher to pull the handle outward.


At any point that the PC rolls a natural 20, the handle suddenly releases itself and a pit drops open directly behind the PC, who must make a reflex save of DC 19 or fall backwards into the pit from the momentum. Any other PCs that had been standing in its area fall in as well (anyone at its edge who gets a reflex save DC 19 leaps to safety).


Notes: If a natural 20 is rolled on the first attempt, the door handle still releases -- but then lower the DC (to 15) against stumbling backwards.


The pit is 75 ft deep and partly filled with 30 feet of foul smelling water.


#92: Spin Cycle.


PCs come to door with a steel knob. The hallway leading up to it has the shape of a long tube, but the floor is placed slightly above midway up -- for all they know, everything beneath that floor is solid earth.


When the door's knob is turned to the right, the floor plummets rightward and swivels up leftward. If the knob is turned to the left, the opposite happens. Whoever turns the knob must make a reflex save DC 15 to grab onto the knob (or fall), and then a climb check DC 18 to stay hanging on.


And there'll be chaos as the other PCs are tossed about (and damaged from banging against walls).
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The PC on the knob needs a climb check to stay put each round, and a balance check if turning it purposefully slow. If those attempts don't beat the DC by 5 (partial success), the knob spins -- moving the floor similarly (50/50 chance left or right). The spin length for partial success is one-quarter of 1d6 (for example, a roll of 3 spins the knob 3/4 of the way, or a roll of 6 spins it one-and-a-half times).


And if the PC fails by less than 5 (partial failure), the knob goes into a mad spin -- 3 full spins per round, until the PC succeeds at the check.


If the PC lets go completely (or fails a check by more than 5 and drops), they'll have to figure out a way to reach the knob again, and make the appropriate climb chekcs if they need to hang onto it again. The handle opens the door when it is pushed in with a bit of force (DC 17 Strength check) before turning it. The floor won't swivel with the handle pushed in.


It could be funnier if the PCs were being chased by a horde of beasts when the knob is turned.


Notes: The floor is held by a thick metal rod at each end of the hallway, which spin by a mechanism attached to the knob. When activated the following happens: both rods spin; a 20x20 ft section of floor below the door slides away (so whoever's hanging onto the knob is cleared by the spinning floor); the floor drops 10 feet (so hanging PC can't use the rod as footing); a stone wall drops at the far end of the tunnel to block escape.


If the PCs give up, they'll discover that once every 1d4 hours, the floor slowly "clicks" back towards its starting position -- the final click raises the stone wall (at the far end) back up. Max 20 clicks (roll d20 to see what position wall is in).


Un-claimer
[sblock]Part of a co-written work (not a "traps" book), go ahead use. For you it's open content
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[/sblock]


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


nice one boozerker! Apart from anything else, you win for formatting, the traps were good too though! So, any ratings on my traps?


Originally posted by boozerker:


There is no winning or losing here, cog_and_taz (just like D&D). We're just submitting traps and having fun.


...another one, the standard locked door with the ceiling coming down(spike to taste), 'cept that when you go in, it activates the lvl 8 otto's irresistable dance spell on the whole party:evillaugh
That could be pretty funny, against our group -- probably get some laughs out of everyone. :D


And thanks for your comments.
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Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


I know, just kidding. As for the comments, you're welcome. I don't get to use these traps on my group much( one person) because he'd just hate me for it/send the rogue in as cannon fodder/randomly toss fireballs around etc.
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Oh, and feel free to ignore the underlines, I just thought spaces weren't allowed.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


By the way, all traps created by the big R in the sky do win, doesn't matter if that's supposed to happen or not:p .


Originally posted by kraleck:


93. Dope on a Soapy Rope
The PCs are being chased by something that they have no chance of defeating. They come across a large chasm that has several ropes that the PCs can balance on. There are 3 x (# of PCs) ropes that they can cross, but 2/3 of them are coated in a slippery soap solution. The soap increases the Balance (if they walk on them)/Climb (if they hand over hand across) DC by five. One mistep and they fall into a fast moving current and wind up ahead of their fellow PCs in great peril.


94. Swamped by the Swamp Beasts
The PCs are crossing a covered stone bridge to get to a wizard's tower and get dumped into the swamp below. Fill the swamp with all sorts of nasties (multiple swarms of swamp vermin work especially well) and you have yourself some freaked out PCs fighting like mad. Later the PCs find out that most of the nasties were actually trying to help the PCs cross the swamp at the magically aided request of the wizard.


95. We're Screwed
The PCs come across a room with a dirt floor and a hole in the corner of the walls and floor. When the PCs find a strange stone with an inscription. Reading said inscription causes the PCs to spin so fast that they get buried up to their chests in the floor (Fortitude Save to avoid becoming dazed and a second Fortitude Save to avoid becoming sickened from the velocity of the spin). The stone then rings like a dinner bell for the critter in the hole.


96. Mealtime Mayhem
The PCs find a banquet hall with a table overloaded with food. When the PCs get within 10 feet of the table, the chairs and silverware animate to hold them at the table and shovel food in their mouths. The PCs must make Fortitude Saves after every pound of food (four saves per PC, the food is super rich and will send them into food comas if they fail all four of them, give them the runs if they fail at least three, slow effect if they fail at least two, -1 to AC and Attacks if they fail at least one). When the PCs have become engorged (the table is cleared of all food when they are), a dinner bell rings and a hungry, PC-eating beast (preferrably with Swallow Whole) is released into the banquet hall.


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


97) Pittrap extreme.


a simple XX foot deep pit. Above this pittrap is a glass plate which is covered by dust, or otherwise concealed. Above this plate is an area filled with acid/poison/rust monster essence or whatever suits your facy. Above this are spikes.


When a PC falls down, he recieves falling damage and triggers the Reverse gravity, sending him up, through the glass, shattering it and pouring the liquid into the pittrap. The PC then hangs up there for how ever long you wish to give him, before dropping into the now filled pit.


The PC can attempt to secure himself up there, or get his allies to cover the hole before he falls down again to prevent dropping down when the reverse gravity ends.


98) A rather expensive trap, it's very effective. A pittrap (yes again) with a portable hole at the bottom. Not very scary you say? Then be sure to ask the partymember how he/she is bringing along all his stuf. Bag of holding you say....


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


99. DEATH
A simple trap really, a massive figure rears up in the hallway in front of the PCs, and swings it's burning scythe towards them, ripping there souls out.


Actually a giant cloak attached to a rod that hurtles upwards, a bit of magic proppelling the scythe into the front PC. The scythe, on making contact, casts power word kill, and if sucessful, triggers a contingenced major image of a ghostly form rising up while shreiking horribly. That should get the PCs attention.


100 BLADE HOPPIN'


Technically nearly impossible to get out of, the Blade Hoppin' machine is mostly for PCs who are incredibly stupid and/or unbalancing. This starts as a rather sissy-seeming trap, with relatively slow-moving blades moving towards the PCs, who can jump or tumble around them. The blades begin switching where they come from, moving a little faster each time, until the blades are hurtling towards the PCs at speeds appropriate to those of a trap. And then if they aren't dead, a WALL of blades hurtles towards them, shredding, grinding, and hacking them apart for several rounds, and then when they stumble out, bloodied and broken, the fall into a pit of spikes and whirling blades.


Originally posted by konad:


26 the pc's find an alter/sarcophagus or something similar, while inspecting item for a trap the rogue sets off a trap that is placed right in front of it. the floor gives way and the rogue falls into a pit, the floor under the alter then pivots and alter falls into the pit on top of the pc


Originally posted by boozerker:


A thousand more to go :D


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


that would be 900 more....


102) not really a trap, but used to be a trap. This was a pittrap a long time ago, but the sides have become unstable. Anyone walking along the edge of the pit causes a landslide of dirt and bricks, being buried underneath them. Adjust DC and damage at will.


Originally posted by boozerker:


that would be 900 more....
:D Oops.


Originally posted by pi_person:


I llike all of E. Ravenwoods traps
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Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


Me too, overly sadistic though. Oh, and please refer to him in more respectful terms: I.E."the big R in the sky":p


Originally posted by kraleck:


Kinda long, but here goes...


103. Pinball Machine of Pain
The PCs find themselves inside a large room with a slightly sloped floor, four paddles, a glass ceiling, pits, columns, panels with animated pictures of monsters on them, and vertical trampolines. The PCs are immediately ambushed by an Etherial Filcher, losing only 1d10 random coins (roll 1d4 to determine metal) before it flees. The room lights up with lots of fancy lights and strange music and sound effects are generated below the floor. The Filcher reappears above the ceiling, only it is now of Colossal Size. It inserts a coin into a slot (seen through the glass) and pulls a plunger, releasing a Large Sized Metal Sphere into the room. The PCs must make a number of Reflex saves to avoid becoming flattened, directed at them by each PC's initiative roll (if a d20 roll matches their unmodified initiative roll+1 from the Filcher fight, the ball is propelled at them, otherwise it rolls past harmlessly). The number of Saves is equal to (# of lost gp)d10 rounds with a 1 round breather inbetween coin inserts. The Filcher will then repeat this process until killed or the PCs run out of coins (the Filcher will bawl loudly when it cannot play anymore). Upon the Filcher's defeat, the PCs can escape through the Sphere's entry hole.


Originally posted by keevo_darkwood:


Me too, overly sadistic though. Oh, and please refer to him in more respectful terms: I.E."the big R in the sky":p
As for respectful terms, I can do one better.


I, for one, think he may actually be the latest incarnation of the infamous Grimtooth. :evillaugh


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


who's grimtooth? Sorry, I'm all out of trap ideas.


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


Don't they teach you kids anything these days? :p


Originally posted by boozerker:


I've only seen some of Grimtooth's traps, but wow, they had me laughing out loud they're so devious.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


Aw, you guys really like me?
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Seriously, you guys flatter me, I'm just a DM who has a lot of
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-ed off PC's around him usually
If you use any traps I, or my compatriot, Quantril, have devised, that is thanks enough
all-right.gif

I'll post so more later, right now I haven't the time to type.
Till then, Via Con Dios


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


#104 The Irish Bricklayer Trap


This is sort of like the one I posted earlier (#39 I believe) but a little bit more sadistic, which I'm sure you all know by now is my better side.
The trap includes a 30'X30' foot room with a 10'x10' shaft leading up through the ceiling, a thick, strong, knotted rope dangling down through the shaft allows the PC's easy access to the top. But only if they do it right.
For the rope isn't tied down to anything per se, rather it is tied to a 500 lb weight that sits on the ledge at the top 150' above, and a pulley in the ceiling threads the rope from the weight to the PC's below. When one PC gets on, nothing happens. If two get on, if they don't go over the 500 lb limit, then nothing still should happen. However, once they cross that 500 lb range, the weight slides off the ledge. Now it gets good.
Whoever's clinging to the rope needs to role a strength (or dex check, which ever you prefer) to keep a hold of the rope as the weight jerks the $*&% out of it. The check should be relatively high, it is 500 lbs we're talking about here. However fails falls off, and takes the appropriate falling damage, and the others who are left on the rope are now taken for a ride as the weight sails down, they shoot up. When the PC's pass the weight coming down, they each must roll a percent check to see if they get clipped by it (25-50 % chance) Which incurrs about 3d8 points of bludgeoning damage and perhaps another chance to fall off.
Whoever is standing in the room below must make a reflex save to avoid the weight when it crashes into the floor, or (check of 13-16, 5d8 Blud. Dmg.)
Now the yahoo's still holding onto the rope will now kiss the ceiling and the pulley as the others below are diving out of the way. This should be another 3-6 d8's worth of damage, plus the loss of use of one's hand or maybe a few missing fingers from eating the pulley.
Then they must roll to keep hold again, and if they fail, they again take the appropriate falling damage. Or you could just do what I did and have the weight break in half one it his the ground, and now that it weighed less than the PC's, they plummit back down after kissing the sky. Mind you, they again could get clipped as the weight goes back up.
Party on, dudes
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Originally posted by kraleck:


E. Ravenwood, you are a trap god. I may just call my deity of traps "Ravenwood" in my next game.


Back on topic:
105. The Doormaker
The PCs enter a room with a hinged panel on the wall. If anybody opens the panel, they must make a Reflex save to avoid a large, springloaded boxing glove. The glove (regardless of hitting a PC or not) smashes through the door and smashes the wall on the opposite side of the room through the door opening a hidden treasure room with several corporeal Undead inside. If the PCs get caught in the path of the glove, they take falling damage equal to half the distance travelled, take 2d4+2 Bludgeoning damage from the initial punch, and provoke one attack of opportunity from the nearest undead.


Originally posted by vader_rocks:


Bumpity-bump bump
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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


nice kraleck i like that one.
ok lets keep this one going i LOVE this thread


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


105: Anyone ever seen Indiana Jones and The Raiders of the Lost Ark?


The players enter a circular room with different colored tiles on the floor. It takes a DC 25 spot check to realize that the tiles look a bit uneven. If a PC steps on the tiles, the tile sinks and a row of darts shoot out the wall at a high velocity, giving them a BAB of 6+. They do no damage to the PC, but the PC must make a DC 28 fortitude check for each dart or become poisoned for 1d12 hours. The darts make the PC a bit woozier and woozier each hour, until at the last hour he passes out and stays asleep for d20 hours.


Originally posted by the_soul_collec...:


This thread needs to keep going.
Bump.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


lol ok guys this is just getting mean, :p


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


:p
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SuperTD

Explorer
[sblock=Page 4] Originally posted by the_soul_collec...:

Cursed items will get beginners almost every time.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


X+1: There is a table, decked out with a feast the likes of which should make the players **** themselves. The room is lavishly decorated, with table decorations and the whole nine yards. When the party enters the room, the door locks behind them and is then concealed behind a stone block, or something that basically says "lawl no" to them.


On the table is a little notecard that reads "The food and drink are poisioned. -Management." None of the bowls can be removed from the tables, due to the fact that it's held down with Soverign Glue. The table itself is resting on four pressure switches which, when the table is lightened (from, say, the food being eaten) they slide back to reveal a trap door underneath the table.


The thing is, the food isn't poisioned. Neither is the ale, it's a trick.
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Absolutely no risk is posed to the characters as they rest in this room, except from their own paranoia.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


X+1: There is a table, decked out with a feast the likes of which should make the players **** themselves. The room is lavishly decorated, with table decorations and the whole nine yards. When the party enters the room, the door locks behind them and is then concealed behind a stone block, or something that basically says "lawl no" to them.


On the table is a little notecard that reads "The food and drink are poisioned. -Management." None of the bowls can be removed from the tables, due to the fact that it's held down with Soverign Glue. The table itself is resting on four pressure switches which, when the table is lightened (from, say, the food being eaten) they slide back to reveal a trap door underneath the table.


The thing is, the food isn't poisioned. Neither is the ale, it's a trick.
smile.gif
Absolutely no risk is posed to the characters as they rest in this room, except from their own paranoia.
Stolen, resistance is useless.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Stolen, resistance is useless.
Ditto.


Originally posted by kraleck:


108. Respect Your Sorcerous Elders
The PCs find themselves in a treasure room that has a mere 3 gp. Upon entering, a statue of a Dragon's head demands they pay tribute in song and swag. The PCs will have to sing a tune to the greatness of Dragons (in Draconic or else) while emptying their pockets and pouches of valuables. Failing either requirement causes the statue to blast the PCs with a jet of fire-ice-lightning-and-acid. Failing both requirements doubles the damage inflicted. If the PCs try to Disable Device, they will have to place the three gp in three slots on the back of the head (and this is the most important part) simultaneously.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


Nice one kral! Also, I thought that my explosive book was the ebst one, but it seems like the dance to death one is more popular, weird...


Originally posted by Richmud:


Cursed items will get beginners almost every time.
The first time I DMed I gave each member of my group what appeared to be a tailor made item when they got to loot a dragon's hoard. They assumed I was just being a nice DM when in fact each item had a tailor made curse to stop them.


Of course I wasn't just being mean, they knew the dragon they were fighting had made some sort of deal with BBEG in order to become a dracolich. They also had been fighting the BBEG's agents long enough that he knew their fighting styles


Originally posted by kraleck:


109. A Sadistic Takeshi's Castle/MXC Knockoff
(Anybody familiar with either show will get the gist of the kind of stunts the PCs will have to pull off. If not, keep reading or search for "Takeshi's Castle Challenges" on Wikipedia.)
The PCs will have to ride a rotating arm and make Jump and Balance checks (and Reflex Saves if they fail any checks) to avoid obstacles and make it to the next room. They will be over a pit filled with a deadly object of your malicious choice (magma, acid, spikes, dire crocodiles, etc.). The next room has them running from uneven roller to uneven roller (making the same checks at a harder check level over the same kind of pit) to get to the third room where they will have to make more insane stunts and so on until they have cleared a number of rooms to your sadistic liking.


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


well it's slowing down a bit, at least now that i've used another trap I can put it up here.


Inspiration from someone here somewhere on the forum, the trap is mine though.
110) Truly sadistic


A room which contains a locked door and four colored cubes and 4 slots where they should fit. The slots are at chest hight and each have a hole above. The puzzle should be obvious to every player. In each hole one can see the color of the cube which should be inserted below.


The catch here is that in the second last hole, there is an invisible needle in front of the hole :evillaugh


Possible effects could be penalties to ranged attacks (the Leela effect) or just simply some damage, add poison as desired.


Originally posted by saberus:


111 (damn, looks like binary...) Illusionary Fireball Trap


This is placed in a 15 x 15 room, the PCs trigger a fireball in the room, and find that they are on fire! the flames continue to burn, regardless of method to extinguish them, roll damage as usual. After all players are 'dead' have them wake up, in the same room, or captured by the enemy, as they were before the blast. (Minus what they used to try and stop the fire and/or damage)


a variant is that the fireball is still illusionary, but also plants an olfactory illusion that the rest of the party reeks, but not them. watch the hilarity insue!!


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


112) one trap I used once was rather ingenious. (if i say so myself
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)


when the BBEG is beaten, he runs out through a secret door, into a special room. This room contains a raised altar with a gateway like arch. this arch serves two distincly different functions. When a person bearing a special sigil (bbeg) walks through, A bright flash of light is brought forth, and the user is teleported away. (obvious, gate-like structure, who goes in doesn't come out, the party adds this up rather quickly)


When anyone else walks through, the following effects happen.
1 - A bright flash of light (like before)
2 - A disintergrate spell on the user
3 - Presidigitation to clean up the mess.
4 - A magic mouth which says, "all clear"


This resulted in a full TPK as the party decided to send the cleric (with teleport spells) though first, followed by fighter, mage, rouge, second fighter and psion.


Originally posted by kraleck:


113. In Case of Emergency...(sort of a variant of #112)
This trap takes place best atop a very tall tower over underground magma caverns. The PCs find the BBEG has already been slain. They see a cloaked figure press a "self-destruct" button and exit through a newly appeared door while holding the BBEG's amulet. If the PCs go through the door, have them make a Reflex save or else they fall X feet to the base of the tower. The door is a one person portal that anybody carrying the BBEG's amulet can use. Any survivors will have 2 times X rounds to descend the tower before it drops into the magma filled caverns below. There are no windows to jump out at the last second and the walls are twice as thick as a normal tower's (as well as being magically treated if you are a spiteful little b******). If the PCs must make it out the door, they have X divided by 10 rounds to get away from the crumbling foundation (and save their fallen comrade's body if they plan to ressurect him/her).
(X is a constant number in this trap. Recommend taking the total of the PCs' levels and doubling the result.)


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


I have a personal fondness for illusions in trapping. Permanent and Programmed illusions are cheap and easy to add for any discerning dungeon owner. Hence:


114: Permanent illusion of an injured and unconscious paladin on a floor to match the rest of the environment (covering area ten feet in front and behind the body). Figure is waering shiny armor, has a big sword, and is blood-stained but still breathing. Whoever enters the five foot square before the figure's triggers a contact poison trap (carrion crawler juice) forcing a Fortitude save. It also simultaneously triggers a Hold Person spell and flips the lid of the pit trap over which they're standing (Will save and Reflex save). If your agile rogue triggers it, the combined Fort and Will saves give a good chance of paralyzing him and ensuring that the reflex save fails. Just for fun, I usually add a gelatinous cube to the bottom (into which the victim falls)...


In order to find the trap, the rogue first has to interact with (ie. enter the area of) the illusion and succeed on a will save to disbelieve it (min DC would be 18 - will is not the strong suit of most rogue types) then make a successful search check.


Originally posted by mysticaloctopus:


115: The Mysticaloctopus Brand (TM) (R) (C) Training Pits.
This is a trick I used on my group to make them think about how they handled pits. First off, throw in two or three moderately well-hidden pits that rogues and elves can find if they make the roll on walking past. Then, throw in an obvious pit (no covering whatsoever, a 5 foot hole the width of the room). After that, have another one later on, with a difference: there is a Programmed Image of a pit just in front of the real pit, and the image also hides the real pit. PCs jump over the pit (All together now! #jump! jump! jump! jump! jump over the pit!) and when they do, they go easily over the illusion... into the disguised 10-foot deep pit. No problem, getting out of it, especially if it's full of water, but it makes them cautious. Next, have a similar trap, but the real pit is just in front of the illusion! PCs find out there's an illusion around the room with a detect magic, edge up to the illusion to prod it and the ground behind it with sticks (#poke! poke! poke! poke the dungeon with sticks!) and... WHEEE! fall into the pit! (#climb! climb! climb!... you get the idea...) Eventually, have pits that go from just inside the doorway to halfway across the room, hidden! PCs will spend the whole dungeon prodding around with 10-foot poles! It's fun, especially with added Gelatinous Cubes!


Afterwards, promise not to do it again and stick to it, as it makes an interesting diversion, but can turn players paranoid about pits and illusions - this was the work of two gnome brothers, an artificer and an illusionist.


Originally posted by serpymatt:


I've only DM'd one campaign before my current one, so I don't have that much insane tarp experience. My only trap was to make sure the PCs wound up in the gnoll prison.


When they entered the cave they found themselves in a round room surround by huge doors. None of them bothered to make a search or spot check and when the first one grabbed a door, they learned the door weren't on hinges and were being used by gnolls as tower shields
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


I came up with these ones over the weekend, hope they come in handy...


116. That's Using Your Head


The PC's have walked down a hallway quite a ways and reach a heavy, reinforced wooden door. The door is either stuck, or lock very well, for the PC's find it very hard to open the thing. There is a cord hanging directly in front of the door that leads up through a hole in the ceiling. After a few minutes (or hours) of working on the door, the PC's are having no luck. This door seems to be alive. If anyone attempts to hack it to pieces, the gouge marks start to heal themselves after a few minutes of being hit. Eventually, the door gets tired of you hacking on it, and a message appears in the door. It states, 'Pull Cord'. If a PC does as the door says, they hear a loud mechanical screech, and the door now reads 'Duck'.
All the PC's standing directly 15 feet in front of the door who don't duck are about to be introduced into a world of pain. A huge battering ram sweeps down from the ceiling and goes for the door, and all the PC's standing in front of it. If they haven't ducked, they are struck by the large wooden log and take 6d8 bludgeoning damage and are carried into any PC's in the way and eventually through the door. Any other PC a PC stuck on the log hit takes an additional 1d6 damage, and which ever PC hits the door takes an additional 1d8 damage.
Now there's a gaping hole through the door, and any PC's still on the other side of the door must climb through quick because the door starts healing itself immediately. Then the battering ram resets itself.


117. And Now for Something Completely Different...


The PC's enter a vast circular room about 75 feet in diameter. There are four wooden pillars even spaced in the room and a large switch set in the floor. It is best to put some bad guys in there so that a fight would ensue. If the PC's don't throw the switch, the bad guys will. When they do, the pillars start spinning, and suddenly, a 30 foot chain flies out with a spiked or bladed ball on the end of it (like a larger version of the weapon Go-Go Yubari used in the first 'Kill Bill' movie) The PC's and Bad guys have to watch these because getting hit by the spiked of bladed ball deals 4d4 damage (slashing or piercing) and the getting hit with the chain causes the chain to pivot, wrap around the person, the ball eventually buries itself in the person, and then they're lifted off the floor and spun around until the chain unwraps and the ball is jerked out, and then their thrown most likely into a wall. What's even more fun is to have one of your PC's try to turn the thing off by throwing the switch the other direction, but I just made it release the chains from the pillars, sending them cascading across the room and then another set of chain and ball exudes from the pillars. Guaranteed to really get your PC's panties in a wad.


118. No Good Deed Goes Unpunished


The PC's enter a room that has a round, stone platform on it. Once all the PC's are aboard, it takes them up through the ceiling, like a elevator. It takes them up pretty high and they are deposited in a room. Once they're all off, the elevator goes back down. They are standing in what looks like the bottom of a huge bowl about 200 feet in diameter. Quite a ways up, there is a flat ridge that leads to a few different doors out. Once they start getting a little bit up the grade, they hear what sounds like a drumming noise that grows louder. Then suddenly, from the ceiling of this room, two stone discs come shooting down a slope, and hit the bowl, sending them flying around the whole circumference of the room.
This is based on those big donation 'things' set up for some organization, the ones that looks like a, well, a huge bowl. Then you put a coin or two down the slot and the coins go flying around and around until they hit the hole in the bottom of the bowl.
This trap is a blown up version of this. The stone disks are about ten feet high and about three feet wide and are slowly working their way towards the PC's who are probably wigging out right now. But you may be asking yourself, "Two disks, that's it, that doesn't sound too hard to get around." And you would be correct.
Every few rounds another disk comes sliding down the track, although each one after the initial two are different sizes and materials, so they all don't follow the same path. Some will go fast, others slow, some will only go around a few times, others will take a long time. If a PC's is hit, or ran over, by one of these stone disks while scrambling for the doors, they take 10d6 bludgeoning damage, and must role a Fort save of 15 or fall unconscious. This means that the other PC's will most likely be hauling the dead weight of the sorry sack that got creamed by one of those disks. Give them something good after this though, because this is one trap that will really
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a party off.


Party on...


Originally posted by kraleck:


Once again E. Ravenwood, you have proven your sheer diabolical awesomeness. Rock on.


Hmm, rock...


119. Between a Rock and a Hard Place
The PCs should be just past the 3/4 point of a long upward sloping corridor with a boulder choking the other end shut. When they reach this point, the PCs must make balance checks or slide downhill to the far door (actually an illusion cast upon a stone or metal wall, the corridor is now locked in place). If they keep their balance, they must Reflex Save into several indentations in the walls to avoid the boulder rolling down the corridor into the far wall. When the boulder is moved, a new entryway is opened for the PCs to go through and a new corridor runs perpendicular to the sloped corridor. When they do, the corridor resets and the boulder goes towards its initial position...but doesn't stop. Yup, another Reflex Save to avoid becoming pancakes, but if they succeed, make them flip coins to determine which branch each person dives towards. The boulder (now unmovable) leaves the PCs separated and unable to communicate to each other. Two paths, two groups: the long, heavily-trapped path (heads), or the short, difficult-monster-filled one (tails).


120. Troll Trolley Tantrums
The PCs are in a multi-ore (iron, silver, gold, diamonds, and mythril in rare occurences) mine with an elaborate (and still working) trolley system. Unfortunately, the mine was abandoned after trolls from the nearby swamp started hunting and killing the miners. The miners knew that the trolls were too stupid to understand the trolley system and used it to cause the trolls to become lost in the winding, overlapping tunnels. Now the PCs are trying to hunt every last troll down without using fire, since the gases in the mine would cause the whole mountain to crumble and completely destroy the town built into the side of it. The troll leader, much to the PCs' dismay, has gotten ahold of a Ring of Greater Acid Resistance from one of the dead miners.


Originally posted by kraleck:


I know I'm 2 hours early for this, but I have to move our computer stand out of the part of the house we will be reflooring. So without further ado:
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


121. An adventure with nothing but traps (Part 1)


My PC's actually enjoyed this, because it was more of the way they got through it as opposed to the actual traps.
The PC's are on a mission to discover the tomb of a local hero, but explorers and archeologists can't place it. There are local bands of nomads in the area that aren't hostile unless provoked, and the party is hired to interview the chiefs of these tribes to discover the whereabouts of the grave. They keep refering the party to the ancient amphitheatre. They discover the vast, round amphitheatre on semi holy ground (this could lead to combat perhaps). The theatre is set in the ground, and leads down quite a ways in a stepped fassion. At the bottom of the theatre is the stage, and set dead center in the stage is a huge statue of our hero. Upon further investigation (many search checks needed) the pc's find that the statue covers a hole in the ground. Once they push the statue out of the way (many strength checks) enough to get a person through, they look down into total blackness (140 foot deep). The moment they through a rope down, they hear what sounds like a puff of wind from below in the dark. The PC who climbs down finds that 80 feet down, the rope has stopped, and it looks like it's been cut. There is a thin line in the stone wall of the hole, and if a PC does what one of mine does, he stuck his torch down below his feet to investigate. A blade comes whirling out of the line in the wall, and severes the torch. An implement of some kind is needed to obstruct the blade, like a sword or tent stake, and jam it into the space of the blade hole. The blade takes 3 rounds to reset, and becoming struck by the blade deals 6d6 damage to the PC and a 50% chance to loose their grip on the rope. Once the blade is ubstructed, another rope needs to be tighed off to the rope their on, and remember, the PC's are doing this all one handed. Tougher than it sounds.


More to come... next, The Efreti is never your friend...


Originally posted by saberus:


I vote to name E. Ravenwood as the Master of Traps!


Originally posted by kraleck:


I second the vote.


122. Seasick Room
This room is in the cellar of a seaside fortress. Because of this, the floor is slick (Balance Checks are needed) from the tides, but it never becomes submerged. The room has semi-round objects of various sizes and weights and was designed to toughen up sailors on the high seas. The PCs must place the rolling objects in their proper spots while the floor tilts slowly yet wildly. The danger of the room comes from the rolling nature of the objects. If the PCs fail a Balance Check, they fall prone and must make a Reflex Save (at a steep penalty) to avoid being crushed by cannonballs/barrels/cannons/stumbling allies/etc. On top of that, the PCs must make Fortitude Saves (at steadily increasing difficulties) to keep their lunch down (failing gives them a penalty to checks and saves for as long as they keep moving around plus one hour (during rest) for every failure), hence the name "Seasick Room." Although, those who have Knowledge based around diseases and the high seas will know various cures and preventatives for Seasickness (ginger, for example, works wonders as a preventative).
(If they succeed several times (at higher difficulties and shorter timeframes each time) they gain +2 unnamed bonus to Balance and Profession (Sailor) Checks. Throw a few sea monster challenges in to give them some variety, i.e. they have to fight tame/controlled sea beasties while sorting the rolling objects alongside an experienced sailor or two. This should teach them that they should concentrate on doing their job while other sailors are tackling monsters.)


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


123. Crash and Burn


illusionary wall, appears to be made of wood, appears to have treasure behind it.
so.... when greedy PCS see the illusionary wall they of course will want to break through and grab the treasure. One of the following things can happen:
1. pc charges straight into illusionary wall and falls into oil which if they are carrying a torch will burn themselves, or if not carrying a torch, one will fall from the ceiling.


2. pc attempts to burn wall with fireball, lights oil and causes a massive inferno.


3. pcs ignore wall completely. (unlikey)


4. pc attempts to kick down wall ( sounds weird, i know, but this actually attempted.) and will slip on gravel. therefore falling into oil and torch falls from ceiling (it just will due to a pressure plate thing in the oil.) and INFERNO TIME.


i know, may not be super good but hey, it might work.


so yeah. :evillaugh


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


oh yeah
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Originally posted by boozerker:


124. Coin Plug.


A coin is laying on the floor. DC 20 strength check to pull off the ground. When that happens, PCs hear a giant echoing GLUG-GLUG-GLUG and an immediate roar, the entire place is flooded ceiling high by water coming from their left and right. Out of a hole below the coin a little note floats out, attached to a chain. The note's paper glows fainlty so PCs can read it, becuase likely any light sources got extinguished by water.


The note says "Flipping the coin on its reverse side before plugging the hole won't clear the water, but it will grant those nearby magic to walk on water"


Replacing the coin on its reverse side basically casts a Water Walk spell, and the players probably won't think of this, but it shoots them upwards at 60 feet per round to conk their heads againt the ceiling. Only thing is, the coin trap had also activated spikes on the celing above.


The bump trap?


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Originally posted by makuya:


124. Coin Plug.


A coin is laying on the floor. DC 20 strength check to pull off the ground. When that happens, PCs hear a giant echoing GLUG-GLUG-GLUG and an immediate roar, the entire place is flooded ceiling high by water coming from their left and right. Out of a hole below the coin a little note floats out, attached to a chain. The note's paper glows fainlty so PCs can read it, becuase likely any light sources got extinguished by water.


The note says "Flipping the coin on its reverse side before plugging the hole won't clear the water, but it will grant those nearby magic to walk on water"


Replacing the coin on its reverse side basically casts a Water Walk spell, and the players probably won't think of this, but it shoots them upwards at 60 feet per round to conk their heads againt the ceiling. Only thing is, the coin trap had also activated spikes on the celing above.
And the greedy shall suffer....


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


Hmm, if you need to make a strength check to pick up a coin, it doesn't take a genius to figure out it's a trap. so, indeed this one's nice


Originally posted by kraleck:


Bravo on the coin trap.


125. It's On Like Donkey Kong
The PCs enter a 15 ft wide staircase area. At the top is a barrel launcher in the shape of a gorilla. When the PCs start to climb the stairs, the "ape" moves back and forth releasing wooden barrels (d% roll of 85 and under) and metal kegs (d% roll of 86+). The barrels will break on contact with the PCs and douse them (and those near them) with alchemists fire (or whatever nasty you decide) while the kegs will knock the PCs (and those behind them) back 10 feet unless they make Reflex Saves (only if they are in the path of a barrel/keg) that increase in difficulty as the PCs approach the launcher. When any of the PCs gets within 5 feet of the ape-shaped launcher, they must make a difficult Reflex Save to avoid a hammer swinging down from the "head" of the launcher. Failure means they get thrown back 20 feet and are in the path of the next barrel/keg (as well as getting laughed at by the "ape"), but success means the launcher deactivates when it can't hit anybody.


Originally posted by lordhawkeye:


There is a table, decked out with a feast the likes of which should make the players **** themselves. The room is lavishly decorated, with table decorations and the whole nine yards. When the party enters the room, the door locks behind them and is then concealed behind a stone block, or something that basically says "lawl no" to them.


On the table is a little notecard that reads "The food and drink are poisioned. -Management." None of the bowls can be removed from the tables, due to the fact that it's held down with Soverign Glue. The table itself is resting on four pressure switches which, when the table is lightened (from, say, the food being eaten) they slide back to reveal a trap door underneath the table.


The thing is, the food isn't poisioned. Neither is the ale, it's a trick. Absolutely no risk is posed to the characters as they rest in this room, except from their own paranoia.
One thing though, what's stopping them from just removing the food and tossing it aside rather than eating it?


Originally posted by kraleck:


One thing though, what's stopping them from just removing the food and tossing it aside rather than eating it?
The player's lack of Intelligence and creativity.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


126. An Adventure with nothing but traps (part two)


The Efreti is never your friend...


After the PC's have by-passed the blade trap from #121, the find themselves in a cave-like chamber that is in the shape of an elipse. It is about forty feet wide, eighty feet long, and tapered at both ends, with a bunch of crevaces and nooks that lead into different chambers. It should be mentioned that there are skeletons littering the floor, some skewered on stalagmites, some look as though they just keeled over, with twisted death screams frozen on their mouths. As the PC's move along, they find that at one tapered end of the oval chamber leads into a hallway, the other end has a large statue of an Efreti with eight arms, seven of which hold valuable things, one is empty. The Efreti is made of highly polished bronze and large ruby's have been set into the metal all over his body. When any light hits the statue, it looks as though "fire swells around him in a quite inferno" The Statue's face is contorted in what looks like a war face (you know what a war face is?...AAAAHHHH, that's a war face, now let me see your war face!)
His eyes are narrowed evily and his mouth is open in a silent scream of carnage, lust for battle and to kill.
The "valuable items" are weapons and armor, each of which appear to be magical in some way (up to the discretion of the DM) the point is, the PC's can have anything the Efreti offers, however, he can't have it for free. The empty hand must be filled with something that is valuable (no mundane crap here) before a PC can take anything from the efreti...safetly anyway.
If an item is taken from the efreti without an offering first, a bellow will arise deep within the statue. From his mouth, blue flame spouts from the statue in a huge fire ball that is launched from one end of the chamber to the other. Everyone must roll a reflex save for half daamge (DC18) or they are roasted. Seriously. They take 5d12 worth of fire damage, and everything burnable on their person has done so. That means clothes, hair, backpacks, items, if they were carrying gold coins, it's no a solid lump, most likely the sheaths to their weapons are gone, but more importantly, magical items aren't even safe. That means gloves of dexterity, cape's of charisma, boots of striding and springing, are all now a pile of ash on the stone floor.
The statue will continue to launch fire balls until the PC's discover they must make a trade, and if they do try to put a mundane object in the statue's hand (ie: common sword or dagger, shield, armor) the efreti will also spit fire.
This is also a good way to work in a cursed item...


More to come, next time on Adventure of Traps...Slip and Slide Hallway.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


127. Adventure with nothing but Traps (part 3)


Slip and Slide Hallway


Now that the PC's are well done from the Efreti, once they're done farting around with it, they're ready for the other end of the chamber. They are plunged into immediate darkness as they enter the hall, which appears to be masoned, so it is finely worked stone, with smooth walls and floors. Eventually, the lead PC starts smelling something funny. He must roll a wisdom check of 12 to recognize the scent. It's oil. But there appears to be no reason why. As they proceed, the tunnel takes a sudden plunge, a 45 degree slope that goes down about thirty feet. If the PC has recognized the smell, the DC for this will not be as high as it would be if he hadn't. the floor of the slope is covered with oil, making it slick (and flammable, hopefully your PC's were smart enough to extinguish open flames and use something else as a light source) The PC's, however, do not know there is oil on the floor, they only smell it, now stronger than ever. Once they step foot on the slope, the must roll a balance check (DC 15, if they smelled the oil, DC 20, if they didn't) Either way, they're sliding down the slope, the balance check is just to see if they do it on their feet, or on their a$$e$. Once they go the thirty feet, the hallway levels off again, and they are skating down the hallway at a pretty good speed. Some might even enjoy this (at least the ones who are doing it standing up), until...
They suddenly see a fork in the hallway, a hallway suddenly juts to the left. they need to make a Reflex save of 15 (20 if they're on their butts) to catch the wall and save themselves. If the catch it, they can make their way into the wallway. If they keep going straight down the slippery hallway, the floor suddenly stops, and their launched over a thirty foot deep pit...or stalagmites. (3d6 falling damge + 5d8 piercing damge =
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If your PC is still alive, he's going to have a hell of time getting out of this one. Again, skeletons litter the spike ridden floor, and it's a flat, oil slick wall to climb up. The PC's are eventuall going to need to get out through this tunnel again, so eventually their going to have to do this...hopefully when nobody's in the tunnel. But for the guy down in the pit, he's going to need to do it to get out of it period. He has to light the oil on fire. The oil blazes up the wall and tunnel, and is completely burned off in six rounds. But for anybody caught in the tunnel, that means 3d6 burning damage each round they stay in the blazing inferno.
This may not look like a dangerous trap at first glance, but it turns deadly real quick...which is why I like it.


More to come, Next time on Adventure of Traps...Rips Cords and Murder Holes


Originally posted by saberus:


Ok, we have two votes to name E. Ravenwood the Master of Traps, do I hear a third to make it official?


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


E. Ravenwood has my vote for the master of traps.... The PCs in my campaign hate his traps with a deep passion, but it is still much more interesting (and easy for the DM) then hordes of monsters for the 7-8 players he DMs for!


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


E. Ravenwood has my vote as well. I'm planning on using some more of his in my next few. Boy are my players hating it!


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Illusionary passage/Spike door.


128) You have a normal door, except the door is covered in spikes. The doorway itself is covered in an illusion of just normal wall for the environment. Your bad guy of the day bolts through the illusion and slams the door shut behind him. The PC charge into the illusion, just like they saw the badie do, only to run headlong into spikes.
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Originally posted by kraleck:


129. And Now For Something Completely Different
The PCs will have to walk in silly and ridiculous ways (Dexterity Checks) to pass through a spike filled tunnel to find a ghost's lost parrot. Upon returning with the parrot, the PCs will have to convince the ghost that the parrot they retrieved is no more, it has ceased to be. If they do, the ghost lets them leave (they cannot leave until the ghost opens the door from the other side).


130. And Now For Something Completely Similar
As #130, except the parrot is Undead and attacks them viciously. They will have to capture it in a gold cage that the ghost provides them. The ghost uses the parrot as the key for the door when retrieved.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


131. An Adventure of nothing but Traps (Part 4)


Rip Cords and Murder Holes


If the PC's have survived the Slips and Slide tunnel (#127) they are ready for their next trap. As they make their way down the hall, they suddenly notice that the floor has shifted from stone to sand. As they continue on, they auddenly find a portion of the hallway goes under a large arch, with the message: He who seeks Enlightenment shall drown in a sea of Darkness.
This may not mean much now, but it will in a few seconds. As they enter the hall,the passage narrows to five feet in width, and there are a few things that should catch their attention immediately. One, the hall is about sixty feet long, and every ten feet on the ceiling is hole, about a foot in diameter. Every hole has a 3 foot in diameter shaft of brilliant light shining out through it, illuminating the entire portion of the hallway.
Two, all along both side of the wall is a freso of crashing waves made of what appears to be tiny bead with tiny little holes in each of their centers. Thirdly, the is another archway much like the once they passed through at the other end of the hallway.
Now time for the trap.
The first person to disrupt a beam of light is in for a suprise. When they interrupt a beam of light, 2d4 pitons connected to thin wire fire from the right side of the wall, pierce the PC, and keep going until they connect with another hole on the opposite wall. This will freak most of the PC's out, now that they're a human kabbob, but each piton does only 1d4 damage each. Don't worry, it gets worse. Role a 1d6 to find out where the PC was struck, 1=chest, 2= R.arm, 3=L.leg, 4=torso (belly to hips), 5=L.arm, and 6=R.leg
Each one of these wires is super thin, I'm talking high E# piano wire, and trying to pull them out will only result in a sliced up hand, dealing 1d6 to the idiot who tried it.
The only way to get them out is to cut the wire (hardness of 10, hp of 5) but even this can result in lots of damage (have you ever seen a guitar string pop, it's not like it just goes limp) So do what I do and have there be a 50% chance of someone getting hit with wire when it goes flying after it's cut. Odds are it'll probably be the guy skewered.
However, this can only occurr if you PC's are smart and jumped right on the task. Give them a few rounds, and then tell them they hear a loud "kong" come from above, like a sledge hammer being dropped into a steel bucket after it's been dropped from the Sear's Tower. Suddenly, gouts of water begin to pour in from the holes, and huge stone slabs are shutting on both arches, sealing the room off. If the PC's ditch their buddy and take off, they should be able to make it through safetly. However, the guy just 'hangin' there is screwed. The room is now sealed both ways, and the room is filling up a foot of water every two rounds with a ten foot ceiling.
There's really only two ways out of it for this guy, he can either...
1) He carefully snips each wire taking tedious, gentle movements to keep the wire from launching back into his face, stringing the wire back through him, careful not to hit anything "important" inside of him, and then drown, or
2) He can simply tear the wire from his flesh by simply jerking that part of his body, forcebly ripping it from the inside out. This is going to cause hellacious damage, 3d6 for each appendage, 5d6 if it's a Torso and/or chest shot. This is the quickest way to do it, and believe me, it hurts like a mo-fo.
So now he's in a flooding room with sealed doors on either end. Things are looking pretty bleak, but fret not, I'm not a total jerk. Above the arches, which are nearly as high as the ceiling, is a switch that will release both doors, sending a tidal wave of water into the hall, and the room the PC's who high tailed it just ran into. Then the trap resets itself once all the water's gone.
When I ran this side quest in my campaign, one of my PC's who had been hit by all eight of the wires refused to tear himself free once the water started pouring in, and I really didn't want him to die (strange as it may sound, I actually prefer my PC's to live, and even through my traps are evil and diabolical, they rarely kill my PC's) So any way, if you have a PC who's too stubborn (or too stupid for that matter) who doesn't want to rip himself free, just do what I did. Have the force of the water do it for him.


More to come, next time on Adventure of Traps, The Writing on the Floor


Originally posted by kraleck:


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I...I...I've...got nothing to top that...


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


http://www.dndadventure.com/html/riddles.html(x)


great trap and riddle link


Originally posted by solo_phoenix:


Here's a nasty obstacle that I came up with for an upcoming adventure


132. Shafted


The adventurers find themselves at a large hole in the ground, this hole (or shaft) can either be an entrance to a dungeon, or a passage between two parts. Looking down into the shaft will not reveal much to the adventurers, only that they can't see the bottom due to darkness. In fact, the bottom of the shaft is obscured by magical darkness, unaffected by standard forms of lighting. The shaft depth can be chosen by the DM depending on how much they want the PCs to hurt if they fall while climbing down. The interior walls of the shaft are smooth stone and run vertically, and thus, the shaft can't be descended by climbing on the walls. The adventurers must use rope or whatever to reach the bottom. About 20ft from the bottom is where the darkness starts, the PCs should easily be able to continue down the rope until they find floor.


Now is where the fun begins


The PCs, finding themselves in magical darkness, will behave like most people would and walk in a straight line until they find the edge, probably with arms extended in front of them for safety. Unfortunately though, this offers no safety here. About 20ft above the floor (where the darkness started) the shaft widened, but the floor at the bottom of the shaft is still the same diameter as the top opening, and so, the adventurers are on a platform of sorts, surrounded by a "moat" of no-floor. PCs attempting to find an edge to the darkness have a 98% chance of finding the moat (unintentionally) rather than the narrow bridge that leads out of the darkness. PCs discovering the edge must make a reflex save DC16 to avoid falling over the edge into whatever the DM decides. If the PCs take the extra cautious road of crawling, the reflex DC changes to 5, and if the PCs just walk normally then increase the DC to 20, if they're dumb enough to run, DC50.


Once a PC finds the edge and doesn't fall over s/he can follow it to find the bridge and escape.


Also, I asked a friend how he would react in game and he said he'd have everyone link arms and walk forward, in this case use the appropriate reflex save on one of the PCs at the end of the line, if they fail, make a reflex save of 10 for everyone else in the group, those that save get to make a combined strength check to stop the other guy from falling.


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[sblock=Page 5] Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

Ok, we have two votes to name E. Ravenwood the Master of Traps, do I hear a third to make it official?
You have a fifth vote. Is that enough to get a WiZo to change your title?


Originally posted by solo_phoenix:


He's got my vote too by the way :D


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


133. An adventure of nothing but Traps (part 5)


The Writing on the Floor


Once the PC's have stopped the bleeding from thier wire wounds, they find themselves in a semi-circular room, the circle part towards the arch, the flat part leading across a huge floor of scattered stone tiles with different symbols on each tile. The tiles span about thirty feet, with a ten foot platform the PC's are standing on now, and a ten foot platformafter the tiles, so fifty feet in all, about fifteen feet wide. Across the room, after the tiles, is a set of heavy, wooden, double doors.
The floor again has turned from sand to stone, and in front of the tiles is the message, "You one you seek, is the one you shall find, produce his name, or fall victim to time". I have just noticed I have not mentioned the hero's name you seek, but I'm sure you can come up with something. My hero's name was Credence Brahn.
The tiles are set up in jagged, un-patterned shapes about 8x8 inches. Each stone is either marked with a letter from one of the three alphabets, Common, (insert language of the area you're in now), and Draconic. This is one of those traps that may appear easy at first, and casue people to jump the gun. This is a big no-no.
Most people will figure, "Oh, spell out this dude's name, well, shaa-right, this'll be cinch." These people deserve what's about to happen to them. Because these are the people who are going to hop on the Common symbols.
Now, the tiles sprawl about thirty feet up this room, so their's really no jumping it. If someone starts hoping on the Common tiles, they find about halfway up the tiled part of the room, they have run out of letters. The Common tiles are just fillers. The only tiles that will work are the Draconic, or the other language. Hopefully their is a member of the party that can read one of these too languages. If not, mention that one of the PC's remembered in passage the other language being written on the wall near the efretti or something, so they have to back through all the rooms to find it, and then try to figure out if it's the hero's name.
Either way, this is no easy feat. Even if they figure out the symbols to hop from, their so small, a balance check of 12 is needed for anyone carrying over a light load. If someone hits a wrong tile, the tile gives out and the PC falls through into blackness. The PC's not dead, but he won't be joining the party for a bit. Once they've made it to the other platform, they pull the double door open, revealing another set of tiles, shorter this time, about twenty feet. The symbols are the same, except each tile is a uniform square foot all around. The message in front of the tiles no reads, "A test of knwoledge you'll now mount, the shortest distance between two objects, and zero does not count".
This is a trick question, however, if they want to figure out how to spell out "straight line" in one of the languages, it will work. The idea is to pick a row of tiles, and travel straight across, in a straight line (ha, see, it's funny, right?) Once that's done, they now pull open the next set of heavy wooden double door and reveal...


More to come, next time on Adventure of Traps, The Tomb of Terror


Originally posted by keevo_darkwood:


He's got my vote too by the way :D
A-freakin'-men! Neo-Grimtooth does it again!
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Originally posted by destrieth:


134. Deep Fried


The PCs are of course in one of your nefarious Dungeons! The PCs are walking along in a dank, slimy dungeon. The walls are lined with tapestries depicting various cooking practices featuring people as the main course (boiled, baked, flambe'd adventurer, you name it). Well, there's one that features a paladin in a vat of oil. This is interesting because hidden behind the tapestry is a high-powered magnet (DC 15+AC bonus of armor strength check, so 23 for plate) that pulls the victim through the tapestry. Behind it there is a lip meant to trip the victim, sending him down the chute. He lands in a big bowl of gooey yellow stuff. (You know this to be an egg wash!) After floundering around for awhile and trying to scramble up the chute again (DC 20 climb check, apply a -4 penalty for being covered in egg) the bowl-shaped room begins to drain.


After draining, the bowl flips entirely and the victim lands on a big pile of white 'sand'. (Flour, bread crumbs, whatever is aesthetically pleasing to you, the DM) After more confused floundering around, a big fan opens in the wall and blows the 'sand' through a grate on the opposite wall. After this, the floor begins to recede into the wall, revealing a big vat of cooking oil below!


Without some serious acrobatics, the meathead will become a hushpuppy. I only recommend about 2d6 damage or so per round in the oil, for about 5 rounds (30 seconds). Then, the room drains again, and on the far wall, a door slides open revealing a hungry Tyrannosaurus Rex or something. Whatever you think would be willing to eat a golden brown adventurer!


For added effect, have a door open up next to the chute, allowing the rest of the party to follow him down sets of tunnels next to the rooms, complete with grating to allow the party to watch him suffer as he gets egged, breaded, fried, and then possibly eaten.


Recommended for higher level parties! :D


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


135: You enter a room and suddenly the ceiling splits, dumping dozens of cookies and my vote on you
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


135: You enter a room and suddenly the ceiling splits, dumping dozens of cookies and my vote on you
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Oh! You guys...
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Originally posted by saberus:


I wish I had the power to bestow a title.


Will the WizO moderating this thread please hear our call to name E. Ravenwood the Master of Traps?


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would'ja do it for ten coppers?


Originally posted by vader_rocks:


He's got my vote, too!


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Originally posted by solo_phoenix:


Got to use my aformentioned trap today...stupid dwarf fighter made his reflex save with a lucky roll and then stared tapping about with a 10ft pole like a cane.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


E.ravenwood= that guy in the sky who bosses
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s around.


The rest:
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Who else agrees?


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


E.ravenwood= that guy in the sky who bosses
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s around.


Who else agrees?
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I do, He's got my vote!
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Originally posted by saberus:


E.ravenwood= that guy in the sky who bosses
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s around.


The rest:
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Who else agrees?
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I do! I do!
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Originally posted by vader_rocks:


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All hail the Almighty Ravenwood!
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I can't wait for the next one!


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


136. An adventure of nothing but Traps (Part 6)


The Tomb of Terror


If your PC's have crossed the tiles without wracking their brains too hard, they are ready to proceed.
They open the heavy, wooden double doors to reveal...a small circular room a heavy rusted switch in the center. If the PC's wander in, they notice the room is about thirty feet in diameter, and the ceiling goes up, and up, to high for them to see. Skeletons lie in small crevices in the walls like a catacomb from the bottom all the way to the top, all around the room. The switch looks as though it has not been used in years, but the PC's will need it if they didn't put jack-squat into climb. Now even though the PC's will need this to get to the right place, it is going to deal damage to them. It only depends on how much armor their wearing. On the switch's long, slender handle, barely readable, is the message, "Throwing me forward will send you forth, when you are south, and what you seek is north".
Eventually, someboady is going to through this lever, and when they do, that's when the fun begins.
The ceiling is about 150 feet up above, and about 120 feet up is a lip to a circular platform about 30 wide that surrounds the tunnel with a hallway leading out of it. (kinda looks like this (O)= )
At the top of the ceiling is a huge fan with three long, fat, iron blades When the switch is thrown, the blades become magnatized, nad start to spin. Then, all PC's wearing armor or carrying anything substacially metal, feel themselves being drawn up, kind of a floating feeling. Except for PC's is plate mail, and other heavy armors of the like. Instead of floating, they feel like they're plummeting...upwards. Eventually, they are hauled up and attach to the blades, or in the heavy armor PC's case, slam into it, causing 2d8 bludgeoning damage. The power to the blades only last 3 rounds, it should take on 1 round for heavily armored PC's to reach the top, and only 2 rounds for anyone wearing light/light-medium armor. The 3rd round is for stragglers and to torture the heavy armor players, for every round they are attatched to a blade, they are generating electricty, taking 1d6 shocking damage every round.
Once the three rounds is up, the power cuts out, and the PC's are thrown from the fan like a magnatized catapult, tossing them on the platform around the pit. Along these wall, too, are catacombized tombs of skeletons long dead, and the lip of the pit has huge stones with weird archaic writting across them. The is a hallway that leads out of the room, above it reads the meassage, "Doubt not, and you shall find him".


More to come, Next time on Adventure of Traps, Grotto of Gravitation


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Ok ravenwood YOU ROCK. You are my idol
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Originally posted by solo_phoenix:


Woo Ravenwood!


Originally posted by Qube:


137) jump against the wall:


you'll need a ending corridor (preferably 5 or 10 ft wide)
a pit
an illusion:


the pit is the last square(s) of the corridor. on the endwall of the corridor there is an illusion that the corridor coontinues. when one of the partymembers tries to jump over the pit, to (what he believes to be) the other side of the pit, he hits the wall (because their actually IS no other side to the pit to jump to) and falls in the pit.


As DM: act asthough their is a wall of force
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(draw the other side on the map, ...)


Originally posted by kraleck:


138. A Deadly Version of Chutes and Ladders
The PCs come to a maze of slides and ladders. Some of the slides have spinning blades at the bottom activated by weight in the chute (R). Some of the ladders are trapped (fire jets when they touch a certain rung (R), electrified ladder rung (F), contact poisoned rung (F), broken rung (R)). Any danger induces a Reflex (R) or Fortitude (F) Save. When the PCs make their way out of the maze, they step on a one-way teleport circle with a small amount of charges left. Yup, all PCs must make individual Will saves. If anyone fails, everyone goes back in the maze, but those that make their Saves don't have to make another Save when they step on the teleport circle again.


139. Carpentry Guild's Bad Joke
The PCs enter a room with a wood-plank floor and stairs leading down. The PCs are allowed difficult Search Checks to initially notice certain planks are not nailed down on one end. The Search checks are easier when they see that stepping on certain planks causes them to pivot and smash the PCs in the face (1d4 for Small PCs, 1d6 for Medium, 1d8 for Large, increase the die size for every Load Size beyond Light Load, Reflex save to avoid). This is made more difficult by a rotted patch of planks that drop them into the floor below. The second floor has loose planks that sandwich the PCs and Low-Light (increase to normal light if they fall through the floor above) conditions. The floor below that has sandwich planks with caltrops scattered along the floor and No Light (increase to Low-Light if they fell through the floor before) conditions. When they step on the planks here, the caltrops fly to a new five foot square. There is yet another floor below that has No Light no matter what. Here there are sandwich planks, caltrops, and a strange dust that scatters into the air when they walk about (decreases any available visibility by half). Hopefully the PCs are not carrying open flames since the dust is flour and will explode when burned, consuming the floors above and dropping them into the caverns below.


Originally posted by radijs:


I'm not sure wether or not this trap is clever. It had my players stuck behind a door for about 2 hours game time.


After a long struggle through the party arrives at the dreaded fortress of doom. An ominous black tower decorated with jagged spikes and all sorts of evilness. Its surrounded by a wide moat which appears to be filled with black liquid. There is no bridge and no appareant way into the tower.
If the PC's examine the water they can see that its covered bty a thick layer of lamp oil.
The tower is in fact an illusion designed to distract from the actual entrance. But this isn't the clever part!


The clever part is that the dungeon actually begins at the bottom of the lake where a sealed hatch can be seen.


If the PC's open the hatch they can swim down in a second water filled room where any number of metal doors can be seen. These doors are featureless and offer no lock or handhold. The floor of the room has a few grates. Hidden in one of these grates is a simple glass bottle that when inspected is found to be jetting water into the room but only a small amount.


The doors are stuck tight and cannot be broken because the room doesn't offer any kind of handholds or sure footing.
If they do manage to open the doors even a tiny bit the water will begin to rush out at an extremely alarming rate and the people who where attempting to open the door are possibly sucked into the hole where their bodies would be mangled and torn apart by the extreme current.
Closing the door will let people escape normally to the surface.


The players may want to attempt to close the hatchway. This can be done but close inspection of the hatch reveals that its not watertight. There are a few carved holes at the side which let water rush in even when the hatch is closed.


So here's the trick to the whole ordeal:
The doors are magically sealed to open only when the room is empty of water. A second enchantment removes all the water that flows through.
The bottle is a decanter of endless water which spouts in conjucnction with the water level of the lake. The bottle doesn't spout normal water though. The water it spouts turns to thick burning oil when it comes in contact with air and turns back when its only in contact with oil or water that came from the decanter. (PC's don't want to set fire to the lake.) So when the decanter spouts water while on the surface it will appear as if oil was coming out.


So what is the key to disabling this trap? Simple. Deactivate the decanter of endless oilwater. Its command word activated and an identify spell will reveal the command word. When the decanter has been deactivated the lake will drain over the course of a few hours and the doors will open.


It stumped my players. They tried UMD on the decanter but didn't meet the DC and they forgot about the rod of identify I supplied them with a few weeks earlier.


So if you spring this on your PC's make sure they have means to identify the bottle.


Originally posted by boozerker:


#141. Bite-Size Death


A deep part of a dungeon is filled with surprisingly clear water. Along the walls (barely above its floor) are "sconces" with Continual Flame on them. Their light is enough to reveal shiny bits of treasure (gems and coins) scattered here and there. If anyone swims down and picks up any of it, a heavy metal grate whips across 15 feet above and traps the PC below. The steel bars are 8 inches thick.


The fun begins when the same mechanism releases a swarm of piranas which haven't eaten in days.


#142. Orc of Falling


The PCs are in a cavernous dungeon where some orcs are known to be about or escaped. When PCs near the bridge over a gorge, an orc darts from behind a rocky pillar and scurries across the gorge's bridge to disappear beyond in the dark.


However, the bridge is an illusion spell triggered when PCs enter this area, and the orc is a second illusion triggered when PCs near the pillar.


If any PCs decide to pursue, they fall (perhaps a high Reflex save to reach for the cliff's edge before plunging, then a Climb check to hang on). The fall is particularly deadly because above the gorge, there are multitudes of pointy stalactites hanging... which means that down below, hundreds of pointy stalagmites await.


Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:


142: look alike


this is a trap set in a long narrow passage lets say 100 feet long 5 feet wide with one bend halfway


at the beginning the pcs go through a arch that is protuding from the walls so there is a noticable lip and the arch is about three feet wide made from three bands of different stone


sandstone/granite/some other really strong stone.


fifty feet down is the bend. enough to hide the enterence. at the far end they can see a treasure chest. as the pcs walk up to the chest they see that the passage ends after it. the first person who gets within 5 feet of the chest trips the switch and the wall in the arch (the granite part) slides sideways and is now a reinforced stone wall. this makes a loud bang.


as soon as someone touches the chest they realise that it is a mimic and there is another mimic that is stretched out as the floor leaving a five foot step for the first pc. the second mimic is only 15 feet long and anyone on it realises they cant move anymore.


the mimic on the floor releases his hold on the stone and with his load drops down the X foot pit and fights with whomever is with him.


after the mimics are dead they still have to get out and from this area there is no way to open the wall but there is a secret door at the bottom of the pit.


Originally posted by retiredthief:


Here's the trick. The walls are still there, but they're hidden in an illusion, and the entire room is ringed with Teleportation Circles that lead to the opposite end of the room. Remember that retro video game Asteroids, where you could fly off the edge of the screen and reappear on the other side? This is the same thing. You can go through one of the teleports and attack an enemey who *thinks* he's a safe distance from you. Also, anyone who misses with a ranged weapon has to make a reflex save to avoid being hit in the back by his own bolt/arrow/magic ray/etc.
Witchcraft, that's cool! And the setup with the darknes and brazier, really makes it come alive.


Originally posted by kraleck:


143. Dirty/Hairy
The PCs are making their way through a room covered in dust, dirt, and debris. When they notice there is a trapdoor made of gold (it isn't, it is an illusionary coloration) they also see that it can be easily removed. When they do, a large, hair and dirt covered beast climbs out of the trapdoor and savagely pummels the PCs within an inch of their lives (doesn't kill them outright, just beats the crap out of them), then grabs the door, resecures it, and shuts it behind itself. Hitting the creature with water based spells and attacks causes it to flee the room to re-cover itself in dirt.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


144. Adventure of nothing but Traps (part 7)


Grotto of Gravitation


As the PC's enter the hallway above the pit, like I previously stated, skeletons line the walls in a catacomb fashion. As they make their way down the hall, they find they're begining a decent further down into the ground. Also, as they make their way further down the hall, the crypts appear to become more fancy, with epitaphs and stone statues of fully armored soldiers, hero's, etc. Eventually, they find they are walking in a slow spiral, like the ramps at a major league sports stadium, traveling further down. The grade also becomes steeper, and the stone floor turns into crude steps. They are decending so far beneath the surface, moisture and gooey stuff line the walls and floors, so much so, it is hard for any (even the most nimble) PC to keep their footing, so a balance check will be needed at some point. If someone loses their footing, they get a CHOICE to make a reflex save on a torch holder. If they don't take the chance, they fall on their tails and go skipping down the stairwell. If the do take it, they have to make a Refsave of 14 or go skipping down the stairwell on their two good cheeks.
If they succeed, then the fun begins. When they grab ahold of the torch holder, it is rigged, and comes off in the PC's hand. When that happens, a fifteen foot portion of the stairs comes free and goes sliding down the stairwell. All PC's stading on that 15' portion of the slab are no in for one hell of a ride as they're sent flying down the staircase. Any PC in front of the portion of the staircase, or standing on the edge of the breakaway point, must make a reflex save of 15, or the people on the edge are thrown forward, and they, including PC's standing in front of the slab, are ran over by the runaway portion of the stairs for 6d6 damage.
Those who remain on the slab are whirled around the stairwell a few time, so a Fort save of 13 is needed, or they are considered sickened and dazed for 3d6 rounds. Any who haven't lost their lunch suddenly find themselves launched out of the exit of the stair well into a vast room filled with statues, epitaphs, tombs, and monuments. There is a raised step of stone about thirty feet into the room, so when the PC's on the slab pile into that, they are launched into the rows of tombs, impacting xdx amounts of damage (DM's discretion) The rest of the PC's have to stoop and stumble down the rest of the steps to enter the vast room.
Since they haven't just done an impression of a meterorite, it is probably a safe bet they're the first ones to see the small mountain in the center of the large room with a shaft of light falling brilliantly upon a white temple that sits at its peak with a large row of steps leading to it.


More to come on Adventure of Traps, next time, Mausoluem of Malevolence


Originally posted by retiredthief:


You have a fifth vote. Is that enough to get a WiZo to change your title?
(I'm a newbie on these boards, but I'd vote for him too. Overwhelming combo of good quality trap ideas, and lots of them.)


Originally posted by someonelse812:


There is a riddle written on the floor of the room, it says, “It flies but has no wings, kills but has no arms, once grand and full of life, as a corpse it brings us harm.”
The door on the left has a human skull with glowing red eyes mounted on it, the door in the center has an arrow stuck in it, the door to the right has a clock mounted on the wall next to it. The clock is of gnomish design and displays the current date and time.


The skull door has a negative energy trap on it.
The path of the skull leads to undead, mummies, zombies, skeletons, Bodaks, vampire spawn, ghouls, Ghasts, ghosts, and eventually a Lich. there is no treasure to be found here.


The clock door has a Slow Curse on it; this requires a DC15 will save when it goes off. If you fail you are permanently slowed as the spell cast at level 15 until you get a Remove Curse spell cast on you.
The path of the clock will have simple traps; it will seem almost too easy. It will continue infinitely in a straight line, one trapped room after another. Each room they enter slows their speed through time so drastically, it takes a full day in real time for each room they enter. So if they go through 20 rooms before realizing that this will never end, then they will have lost 20 days, it will take another 20 days to return, even though to them the whole trip only took an hour at most.


The correct path is the door with the arrow in it. It has an arrow trap on it.


Originally posted by vader_rocks:


There is a riddle written on the floor of the room, it says, “It flies but has no wings, kills but has no arms, once grand and full of life, as a corpse it brings us harm.”
What's the answer to the riddle?


Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:


What's the answer to the riddle?
the arrow. it fills out the last 2 parts of the riddle because it was once a tree and now it is dead and is a corpse that is dangerous. the skull fills the last two parts only and the clock fills the first two only.


Originally posted by myeviltwin:


One very simple and one not so simple.


The Leg-Catcher:
Dig a hole in the ground about 2-3 feet deep and less than 1 foot wide. Place a pressure plate inside, with spikes set to close in a manner like a bear trap. Cover with gravel or leaves.


Anyone who steps on the trap and fails an initial Ref save is quite effectively pinned in place. A successful escape artist or Str check can pull the leg out, but deals damage to the character. A successful disable device check can release a pinned character without damage.


Only a step above a booby-trap, mechanically, it can be very effective for "mining" an area where combat may go down. Considered great fun by kobolds and the like.


The Lock:
I put this effective locking mechanism in an inverted tower; the PCs had to negotiate it in order to descend a level.


The first room is round. On the floor in the center of the room is a grate or iron door that can be pulled to one side by a hidden mechanism in the floor. A clay golem is standing on top of the door.


A short hallway leads into a second, smaller room. This room has a number of gargoyle-spouts along the wall, an open drain on the floor, and a large round crank in the center.


The golem will attack anyone who tries to enter the second room.


Turning the crank in the second room has four effects, in this order: a door closes the second room off from the hallway, the grate in the floor closes, water begins to fill the second room, and the door in the first room opens. There is no mechanism in this second room to open its own door or drain the room.


The door in the first room leads to a third room, which is where the party wanted to go in the first place. This room contains another round crank. Turning this crank has three effects, in this order: it opens the grate and drains the second room, it opens the door to the second room, and it closes the door to the third room.


And how do the players pass without drowning or losing at least one party member? The answer is obvious to the dungeon's masters: you ask the golem to open the door for you.


Ways to make the trap more dangerous include setting the golem to only obey people carrying or wearing a certain symbol, or to put a significant delay in the second crank mechanism.


Note that this trap tends to break up the party, so don't use it unless you know one player won't mind being the sacrifice.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


What's the answer to the riddle?
I thought it was a vargule (Sp?) you know the monter in the back of the MM 1 that it just a head with wings


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


148. Adventure of nothing but Traps (part 8)


Mausoluem of Malevolence


As the PC's gaze in wonder at the temple, the others pick themselves off the floor. This room is vastly huge, with tombs all over the floor in rows with designs and scenes of the entombed soul's life. As the PC's head up the staircase towards the temple, the find it is very roman-esque, pillars, columns, the whole 9 yards. When they finally get inside, there is a huge statue with the message at the base that states, "The one you seek is he." The large statue of the hero appears to be made of marble, stands about nine feet high with a large platform around it about ten feet in diameter. The room is shaped like a rectangle with the party entering from one end, and the statue in an apse at the other. The floor in front of the party is littered with treasure. Thousands of coins, among which are several magical items and weapons. Give them something good, this has been a hell of a ride.
But this is still a trap, so I've got to make it good. Along the walls of this room are small insets with statues of warriors. If one of your PC's fell through the tiles in the "writing on the floor" trap, the PC's now recognize that their is a statue of them in one of the insets.
Set in the wall is a small switch in the downward position. If you're PC's put two and two together, they might figure this is a way to bring their buddy back to the real world. And it is, but the problem in throwing the switch is it brings all the statues, skeletons, bodies, back to reality.
What the PC's may not have known was that the hero died in a war, and up above on the surface, a great battle was fought generations ago. All the bodies were buried in this mausoluem, from both sides.
When the PC's pull the switch, the PC who was a statue comes out of it immediately, probably a little freaked out. Then a great rumbling occurrs, and the statue of the hero begins to shake. Out below, statues and skeletons are rising from their graves, and old rivalries begin to come back as the undead army's clash below. Eventually, they'll make their way up to the PC's, who will have good position up so high, but eventually will be overwhelmed.
The statue of the hero breaks from its base, and begins to rise up in the are, being driven up by a large pilar that has a spiral staircase wrapping around it. The statue eventually is driven up throught the ground from below, and the PC's can scale the steps to escape, fighting off the skeletons as the ascend. Once their out on the surface, they have completed thier quest, although they have just unleashed a horde of undead upon the lands...possible foder for their next campaign.


This has been, Adventure of Traps, I hope you enjoyed it, and that it will come in handy. Thank You.
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Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:


I thought it was a vargule (Sp?) you know the monter in the back of the MM 1 that it just a head with wings
well thats a good guess but the original riddle says "it flies but has no wings"


Originally posted by solo_phoenix:


148. Adventure of nothing but Traps (part 8)
This has been, Adventure of Traps, I hope you enjoyed it, and that it will come in handy. Thank You.
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Best. Adventure. Ever!


Go Ravenwood! Master of Traps!


Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:


i deff need to echo the genreal consensus. ravenwood for master of traps


Originally posted by keevo_darkwood:


*smiles happily after reading the eighth installment of the adventure*


WOOOOOOOT!!
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Neo-Grimtooth does it again, folks!!
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Originally posted by solo_phoenix:


/me copies adventure into word for later. My PCs are gonna wish they never levelled up enough to face this.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


ravenwood, you WIN, congratulations and thank you!


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


My apologies...in #127: Slip and Slide Hallway of the Adventure of traps, I mentioned that the PC's would need to eventually need to go through the tunnel again to get out. This was not to mean that once they were done with the adventure, they needed to go back all the way through the mess of traps, just that in the campaign I ran this in, my PC's on a few occasions needed to leave the underground chamber a few times to go find some healing stuffs, and on one occassion, about halfway through, they needed to stop and rest, but did not feel safe in the chamber, so left to sleep in the ampitheater for the night.
Thought I'd let you know so no confussions would arise, thank you again.
-E.
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


149. It Takes Two, Baby


The PC's enter a long, narrow room (ten feet wide by 30 feet long) with two, heavy steel doors leading out. They are locked by two hatch wheels set into the doors, but are too far apart for one person to open them. On the door is the message, "those who open my gate, shall be bound by fate"
Very cryptic
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This means that two different PC's will need to unlock the doors, but they are set so far into the door, they need to reach their whole arm in to turn the wheels. The pair that is brave enought to do this act stick their arms in, and turn the wheels. As soon as the door is unlocked, they feel their arms suddenly seized by a force inside the door. But before they can struggle, it is released. When the both pull their arms out, each now has a shackle around their wrist and about a 3 to 5 foot chain connecting them. Not just any chain...magic chain.
Anyone who tries to bust these guys loose aer in for a surprise. If anyone tries to break the chain connecting the two, nothing happend to the chain, but the guy trying to break it is suddenly wracked with pain (2d12 subdual damage and dazed) Anybody who tries to pick the locks of the shackles sends 3d6 electrical damage to all person (including chained PC's) for each round they attempt to pick them.
There's only two ways to get rid of the shackles.
1) Somewhere in the depths of the dungeon the PC's are in, there is a magical key that will unlock them. This could be in a hiding spot or on an evil bad guys person, or
2) They must seek some outside help form a high level wizard who will only be able to get them off with a miracle or wish spell. This means your PC's get to go through the whole campaign chained together until they can reach a town with a high enough leveled wizard to deal with the trapped shackles, and then pay oodles of money to pay for his services.
Either way, the PC's are going to be close friends for a while. Good to teach a couple PC's the meaning of teamwork.
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[sblock=Page 6] Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

Let's come up with some good, mostly simple traps everyone.
What the hell happened to that?


I move for Kralek to be voted the Godfather of Trapsmithery
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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Wow! What great ideas all of you had... Fantastic! People like you that keep the game alive.
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Originally posted by kraleck:


I move for Kraleck to be voted the Godfather of Trapsmithery
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You forgot the "c." Don't worry, everybody does around here at one time or another. Now to prove my position as Godfather of Trapsmithery...


150. Make Them An Offer They Cannot Refuse
There is a chamber with four doors. Each door has this inscription above it:
"Come on in,
But don't be hasty.
Treasures past those
That find you tasty."
Each door leads to treasure guarded by monsters with Swallow Whole. For every treasure they take, the monsters get more numerous. The trick is to slay the monsters THEN take the treasure. Unfortunately, they must fight a dragon when they leave with any of the treasures. The treasures cause dragons within 200 feet of them to gain special and very unfair advantages:
Treasure 1 - +1 Mythril Chain Shirt that grants a +5 Unnamed bonus to AC, +2 to Constitution, and Regeneration to nearby dragons.
Treasure 2 - +1 Silver Longsword that grants a +5 Unnamed bonus to Strength, doubles critical threat range of natural weapons, and the effects of the spell Wraithstrike (Spell Compendium) to nearby dragons.
Treasure 3 - +1 Adamantine Shield that grants a +5 Unnamed bonus to all Saves of nearby dragons.
Treasure 4 - Boots that grant PCs +20 move speed and grants a +50 move speed, the effects of the spell Haste, and allows consecutive breath weapon attacks (no breath weapon recharge turns) to nearby dragons.
The treasures are always encountered in this order in the dungeon. These advantages also apply to creatures with the Dragon-blooded subtype.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


Nice one K! You started this all, but I still think E is the best, sorry. Keep up the awesome work both of you! Us mortals will just sit here and gawk:p .


Originally posted by kraleck:


151. The Rack of Ultimate Terror
The PCs find a broken stone pedestal against a wall. There are pressure plates on the pedestal and on the wall spread far enough that they have to reach as far as they can to press them all. The wall has a magic mouth that tells them that "only one person may pass to the treasure room if they press the four switches." The trick is that the allies of the one to enter the room ("they") press the switch plates while their buddy enters the treasure room. If the person that tries to enter the treasure room presses all four plates themself, they get a minor shock (1d4 electricity + 1 round stun, Fortitude halves damage and negates stun) and get manacles attached to each limb and across the neck (Reflex Save to avoid if they made the Fortitude, otherwise no save) that very slowly pull the victim apart (10 minutes until the victim meets a messy and violent end). The magic mouth tells them that the manacles must be removed simultaneously or else the victim gets blasted by Acid, Cold, Fire, or Electricity depending on which manacle gets loosened first. The PCs must find levers from four separate tunnels and simultaneously unlock the manacles. Unfortunately, the lever fetchers must answer a riddle about a certain energy type in each tunnel or fight tough monsters with energy attacks depending on the correct answer and correct corresponding lever hole (Fire aura, Cold breath, Acidic slam, Electric shocks). The lever holes have buttons in them that release jets of the corresponding energy at the lever fetchers once (Reflex Save is 5 higher for the first jet since the PCs will suspect jets from the other lever holes). When all four levers are in place the trapped victim is moved into the treasure room and a transparent, impenetrable barrier goes up over the entrance. When they throw the switches (regardless of simultaneous throws or not) their friend gets torn apart and decapitated (be as graphic as you can possibly be). This is only an illusion, their buddy is actually released and a fear effect is activated in the room before the treasure room. Their buddy sees a lever that deactivates the barrier.
Watch your PCs try to turn the "ghost" of their fallen friend and laugh at their futility.


Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:


kraleCk makes a comeback, nice, but a long way to go.


152 - Teamwork ??
The party (asuming 4 players) enters a square room with one 5ft by 5ft square plate in each corner. Standing on all four plates at the same time will raise the room. When the room rises, only floor and ceiling move, the walls do not.


The room moves past several corridors from which all sorts of scary monsters poor forth. Every player must now fend for himself, as the elevator room will drop when preasure is removed for more then one round.


153 - panic button (i suck at making up names)
Chase the party into a hallway with something along the lines of "You hear sniffing and grunting like that of a very large dragon" coming from the opposite end of the hallway. This is all part of the trap.


After the party gets chased down a hallway they see a large "door", covered in button, levers and archaic switches. The party (likely to be extremely willing to escape, will start pushing and pulling and flipping like mad (I ruled a move action to operate two switches.)


The catch here is that every operation deals one point of damage. No save allowed. I've had the party rogue get himself knocked to withtin an inch of his life on this trap.


After a certain number of buttons has been pushed, a more lethal trap containing an area of effect spell (cloudkill etc) is triggered to finish the PC's of. That door however, cannot open in any way, it is simply a dead end wall.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


kraleCk makes a comeback, nice, but a long way to go.


152 - Teamwork ??
The party (asuming 4 players) enters a square room with one 5ft by 5ft square plate in each corner. Standing on all four plates at the same time will raise the room. When the room rises, only floor and ceiling move, the walls do not.


The room moves past several corridors from which all sorts of scary monsters poor forth. Every player must now fend for himself, as the elevator room will drop when preasure is removed for more then one round.
For 152, if you want a better name, I'd name it Tower of Terror, after the Twilight Zone episode/Ride


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


154. The Door that Bites Back #2


This is different from the first "door that bites back" trap I posted, but holds a little more truth to its name.
The PC's come upon a heavy wooden door with gnarled marks all over it, jett black fittings, which include a monster with his mouth gapping upon surrounding the door knob, so it appears the door knob is coming out of the monster's gullet. The only way to get through is a successful lock check of 42 (otherwise, the rogue might lose his lockpicks in the process...you'll see why in a moment) or a tongue shaped key is needed to unlock the door, which the players should have found somewhere in the dungeon before reaching this door.
If the knob is tried without inserting the key, what looks like a bear trap snaps from the hiden depth within the door, shattering the wood around the knob, and latching onto the PC's hand.
It should be quite easy opening the door now that there's a gapping hole in it, but the PC now with the huge, spiked spring loaded trap around his wrist probably doesn't really notice.
The doomed player takes an initial 5d8 damage, and has a 5% chance of losing the hand all together. It takes a Str. Check of 18 to release the trap form the player's gushing hand, which should be impossible for him to take it off himself with his one good hand.
This is a good way to take out that meathead of the party who thinks he's indestructable. Have fun


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


You forgot the "c." Don't worry, everybody does around here at one time or another.
My bad, yo...but sweet trap!


Originally posted by kraleck:


155. Cut the Roots and Topple the Mountain
This works best against heavy meatshields, especially those with low Reflex Saves. The PCs have made it to a large ballroom in the creepy castle. When they split up to search the room let them stand on 5x5 rugs in front of Large statues of warrior weilding weapons. When the weight on top of the rugs exceeds (DM's decision) pounds, the PC must make a Reflex Save or fall through onto short spikes that pierce the feet and activate the springblade trap. The PC has 1 round to remove themself from the spikes (Strength check DC 18) or else they have a 15% chance of losing their legs to the springblade below. In any case, they must now avoid the falling statue trap they just accidentally activated.


Originally posted by razorboy:


A ripoff from Banewarrens Campaign (published by Malhavoc Press) with a minor twist at the end.


Banewarrens Trap (more fun with teleporters... or is it?)
Covered pit trap, 60 feet deep (100 feet deep works well too). Midway down the shaft there is a plate that swings up to block the shaft. The plate has a magical contingency effect on it - produce a loud "Ding!" noise and a bright flash of light. It also has a circle of runes carved into it. The idea is that when a person falls into the trap, the plate immediately swings up, blocking the shaft behind the person while making a teleportation-like visual and auditory effect. The person in reality is lying at the bottom of the pit (feel free to introduce spikes, poison spikes or whatnot), but the party assumes that the person has been teleported elsewhere in the dungeon and run off searching for him.


For a twist, I also added a permanent Silence effect on the true bottom of the pit so that the trapped person could not scream for help, as well as an illusion of the corpse of the trapped person appear elsewhere in the dungeon, thus spooking the rest of the party who thought something in that room had killed the teleported person. When they realized that the corpse was an illusion they were even more spooked, speculating as to what really happened to the hapless person who was still trapped in the original pit trap.


Originally posted by kraleck:


157. Sadistic Stairwell Shenanigans
The PCs are travelling up/down a long winding staircase that stretches in both directions. The stairs are enclosed on both sides and there are no windows, but there are doors that keep appearing on the inside wall. There should be giant rotating blades that buzz through archways intermittently that the PCs will have to time to avoid. The PCs should slog on forever in one direction only to notice that the doors they keep passing are the same door when one person decides to quit going in the direction their buddies are going they will meet their buddies when they go the opposite way. When the PCs notice this and try to exit the way they came in, they will find the door doesn't open as it is now a solidly unbreakable barrier. Touching the door will deactivate the looping teleport field, straighten the staircase, and allow nasties to ambush them on both sides. Bulky polearm specialists and sharpshooting longbowmen will force the PCs back towards their polearm and crossbow wielding foes coming at them from the bottom. The PCs will have to fight their way through a very bloody battle to clear the stairwell. Both sides will consider the PCs hostile. Because of the battle, most of the PCs and warriors will completely forget about the archways with the rotating blades. This is simple to set up, difficult to control, and hard enough to ensure the players will learn about high ground advantages, but not overwhelmingly difficult. Good for novice, intermediate, and expert DMs alike.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


159. Harpooned Ye!


The PC's enter a long narrow room with floors of sand and walls of stone. The room is 60x30 feet, and the floor of sand covers only about half the floor length wise, ending in a drop off of 5 feet into a river of acid. On the side of the wall the floor is on, there are strike marks, and pieces of the wall have been busted out of it, and on the opposite wall, there are several holes about 5 feet from eachother about 4.5 feet from the floor. You should tell any weary PC's that they appear to be murder holes for archers long dead.
This might put their mind at ease.
If any PC walks in front of the holes from across the room, a loud 'SPROING' sounds off, and a heavy, arrow-like projectile attached to heavy rope fires forth from the hole.
Role as if it is attacking with a +X attack bonus (X = PC's level) If the arrow hits the PC, it pummels completely through their body, and masive broadhead spikes spring forth like from the arrowhead, and the line goes tight, and the spikes act as a claw, or anchor, as a winch starts pulling the PC towards the drop off into the acid at about 5 feet a round. The harpoons (I guess that's what they are) deal 2d8+X (X=PC's level) damage. The rope has a harness of 5 and an HP of 5, and it takes 3 rounds for a harpoon launcher to reload itself. If a players is pulled into the acid, hea takes 1d6 acid damage each round he remains in the pool.
I tried this on my party, an two of them got hooked, and the others had a hell of a time trying to help them while being fired on by the other launchers. I thought they hated it and absolutly loathed me, but after they made it out, they thought it was, and I quote, "
censored.gif
-ing Sweet!"
Hopefully, your PC's will have the same outlook:D


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


#160. Koblod Kolision Kourse


My astute Ravenwood put this one in a campaign he ran that my character happened to be leading, but since he has no recolection of it, I will have to guide you fellow members through it.
All righty. This is a trap you should wait to pull on you PC's when they've bedded down for the night in a room of the dungeon with hallways leading in directions they have yet not explored. In the middle of the night, one of them hear's a rustling about, and wakes to find a pair of Kobolds digging through all the PC's stuff. The PC spooks them, and the Kobolds bound away with a pricy magical item crucial the role of your player (in my case, my Female Paladin's cloak of charisma was made off with, causing me to go from drop dead sexy to drop dead purdy in less than six seconds)
9 times out of 10, the PC will pursue with his party in tow, but have the Kobolds dash down one of the halls they haven't exploded yet. Now this is where it gets juicy.
In our party, nobody had darkvision, and nobody took the time to light a torch, so it wouldn't have mattered, but just in case, have your PC in lead roll a Will save of 16.
If they fail, the invisible bar that stradles the hallway 4 feet off the ground just closelined the PC into an oblivion of pain and suffering not describable in mere words, inflicting 2d10 worth of damage if they were in a full run, plust the 50% chance they just knocked themselves unconscious.
Now because the Kobolds are only 3 feet flat, they just run under it unawares, but if the dungeon is their place of residence, maybe they knew about it all along and brought the PC down this hallway just to see him run head first into a bar.
Either way, this is a good trap to get rid of that certain item a PC possess that is making them unstoppable.
The good DM taketh, and he good DM taketh away...
devil.gif

On a funny note, it was this little transgretion that lead to the Kobold Kamakazi trap. (#68)


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


#160. Koblod Kolision Kourse


My astute Ravenwood put this one in a campaign he ran that my character happened to be leading, but since he has no recolection of it, I will have to guide you fellow members through it.
I swear, I do not remember putting this trap in before the Kamakazi Kobolds, but it does sound like something I'd do...hmm...
scratch.gif



Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


#161. Ants are to a Magnifying Glass, like PC's are to _____?


This is a very sick and sadistic trap, so for those of you with virgin eye, I suggest you turn away now.
The PC's enter a room of a dungeon (castle, keep, fort, yadda, yadda...) that is about 30 feet by 30 feet square, with what appears to be a large skylight in the ceiling. A group of henchmen enter the room, and upon discovery of the party, initiate the engagment.
The floor tiles are white, so the sun shining through lights up the whole room, but it also makes a consentrated beam of solar light invisble to the eye. Anybody who crosses over the beam in any way, whether it by through fighting, grappling, shoving, falling, whatever, they immediatly take 3d8 heat damage. It is amazing how long it takes for PC's to figure out that the skylight is acting like a big magnifying glass, and I actually had a PC enter the beam to fight, and stood there fighting for a few rounds because he thought some spell caster was casting something on him so that he took 3d6 damage ever round with no save. What drove him insane was that a party of nothing but axe wielding orcs was attacking the party, so he thought the spellcaster was in cognito
incognito.gif

Good way to get away from those poison arrow, dart and pit traps.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


#161. Ants are to a Magnifying Glass, like PC's are to _____?
love.gif
This is why I love you
love.gif



Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


love.gif
This is why I love you
love.gif
You shmooze:D


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:


162. Score one for the Druids


I once hosted an army campaign were the PC's were all part of a legionairy crusade cutting across unexplored land. One of their missions was to go find a water supply in a forest and then clear a route to get troops there. They hiked through the forest and found a crystal clear lake, but were warned by native elven druids that no more outsiders should enter their realm, or the PC's and their troops would suffer the consequences.
Had my PC's not acted like jerks, I probably would not have sprung this trap on them, but they really have something against druids, and they basically told the chief druid to cram it, and their entire army was going to march in here.
So I brainstormed, and had the chief tell the PC's they would never leave the forest alive.
They laughed and hooted, and started hiking out.
They were attacked a few times by druid archers, but no side really ever gained or lost anything. And then I introduced the traps. An arrow trap there, a pit trap here. They would fall ten feet in, and then would climb out, cursing along the way. I was really just giving them a false pretense as to how difficult the traps in the area were.
Then I had a band of Elven braves come out of the woods and attack, hit them hard, and then ran.
My PC's, already at my blantant attempts to keep them in the forest, ran off for the druids, stepping into THE trap.
Have you ever seen those net traps that when a person steps into it, it pulls them off the off the ground so now their just hanging from a netted bag, more or less. This trap works around that same concept, except tie the ends to two seperate trees, keep the top open, and make sure the tension is tight, and you have yourself a fully customized, 100% organic PC slingshot big enough to handle any sized party.
All members stepped into that thing and the next thing they knew they were zooming above the tree tops making like Hendrix in a purple haze...only they kissed the ground and not the sky.
This is just an idea for a trap, so what ever checks and amounts of damage you want to instill upon your party is up to you, but this trap is worth putting in just to see the looks on your player's faces
:OMG!
eek.gif
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nonono.gif
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blink.gif



Party on!!!
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Originally posted by saberus:


162. Score one for the Druids
This is just awesome, I can see this launching my dwarf right into a nearby mountain, right into his old clanhall, quickly realizing why he left...


E., you must take your crown --->
king.gif



Long Live the King!
fireball.gif
monk.gif
elf.gif
:fight!: < E. Ravenwood's new elite guard


Originally posted by kraleck:


I got this in a PM *clears throat and puts on sophisticated reading glasses*:


Subject line: About your latest trap. (I don't check these very often and it was apparently about #150)
That is very very cruel. Are you direct descendant of Asmodeus?
Thanks Makuya, I'm flattered. Sadly, nay, I am just dedicated to this thread with a deadly passion.


Now back to the PC slaughterhouse thread...er, traps thread at hand.
P.S. Watch your number jumps carefully, Ravenwood, you skipped 158, so this is the real #162.


162. The Arena
The PCs are waiting in line for a seat at the bar to listen to a Bard's performance. They get to the door and find that there is a lightly guarded side entrance that they can pay a smaller cover charge for. The side entrance leads them to a gladiatorial arena filled with menacing beasts and the PCs are the new combatants. The Bard's performance makes the audience oblivious to the sounds of combat below. The PCs do not know, however, that the combatants are all doomed to the same fate: Death. The Arena Boss cheats the odds using the Bard's performance to siphon the luck away from the combatants while he presses buttons, levers, and switches to screw up the combatants fighting prowess (moving the terrain, spraying poisoned needles, opening pits, silencing the combatants, etc.). Should the PCs emerge victorious, the Arena Boss threatens them into a fight or else the Bard's audience succumbs to multiple Wail of the Banshee spells. The Arena Boss cheats constantly and frequently while having his minion manipulate the trap control panel.


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


P.S. Watch your number jumps carefully, Ravenwood, you skipped 158, so this is the real #162.
.
Technically, razorboy didn't number his trap above, so that makes this #163
pbbbtt.gif



(No disrespect intended, please don't have me wacked, Godfather:weep
smile.gif



Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:


164) the mirror room


this trap is good for the gready people. they enter a room in the dungeon and see oh ten to fifteen mirrors but they just look like doorways to other rooms which are full of treasure. if they try to go through a mirror tell them that they feel glass in the way. if they decide to break the glass you roll the dice because each mirror is tied to a skill and when the dice land on the skill they lose one rank in that skill (even able to take it to -1 or lower if they are really unlucky) and that skill counts as cross class until they get a remove curse and make up the lost rank. the key is that you have one that is really just glass and lets them through to some nice loot


as for the skills id suggest like swim, ride, balance tumble bluff climb hide move silently etc the nice juicy ones


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:


Technically, razorboy didn't number his trap above, so that makes this #163
pbbbtt.gif



(No disrespect intended, please don't have me wacked, Godfather:weep
smile.gif
No, Kraleck counted in that one. So the last one should have been 163.


Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:


164. The PCs walk into a room with wood flooring. A rope bolted to the floor leads up farther than can be seen into a shaft and is surrounded by small holes in about a 10-foot square. The rope looks like the only way out of the room.
Now it gets fun. The rope connects to a winch about 300 feet up, and the winch is connected to a blade resting on a few more ropes. The other ropes won't cut until two or three PCs get on the rope or one reaches about the halfway point. Now that the ropes are cut, there's nothing holding the adamantine bars below the floor in place and therefore nothing holding the 10-foot cube of solid stone attached to the floor and the original rope either. It falls, so do the PCs on the rope. If you're a nice DM you might give them some reflex saves to avoid falling into the hole that the block pulled away.
What about the holes? There's a reason the block was held by bars, not a trapdoor. Pressure plates on the bottom of the block, when pressed in, push spikes up through the holes.
165. A sign on the door reads 'beware of good fortune' or some other cryptic message. The first PC to walk into the hallway triggers an Iron Body spell. Say nothing about it and watch that PC's face when a pressure plate down the hall with a 600-pound trigger opens two adjacent doors with rust monsters behind them :D


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


gelatinouscube.gif
incognito.gif
emperor.gif
bobafett.gif
dragon.gif
turkey.gif
:coolcthul <--- add us to E's guard!


By the way, don't insult him by calling him king. I believe I established it a while back that he is "that guy up in the sky that bosses
angel.gif
s around.


Originally posted by kraleck:


I found #165 to be very interesting. Sort of a "beware of Greeks bearing wooden horses" kind of deal. Unfortunately folks, I do not have something at this time for you. Sorry, maybe later.


Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:


Thanks Kraleck. That's exactly what the party tank thought as well :p Anyway...
166. The PCs find themselves in a very dark, very humid hallway. The ground is covered up to their knees in damp straw. Either the hall is too far to be seen across with darkvision or there's magical darkness in the middle of it. Point is, they can't see to the end of it. So of course, to find their way, one PC will light up a torch. Which is too bad, since the air was humid from having gas fumes pumped into it and the straw damp from years of gas fumes. All the PCs took some sizable fire damage from the air igniting and I treated the burning straw as lava in terms of fire damage per round.
On the upside, now that everything's on fire they can see down the hallway...
devil.gif



Originally posted by saberus:


gelatinouscube.gif
incognito.gif
emperor.gif
bobafett.gif
dragon.gif
turkey.gif
:coolcthul <--- add us to E's guard!


By the way, don't insult him by calling him king. I believe I established it a while back that he is "that guy up in the sky that bosses
angel.gif
s around.
My bad, but E needs a celestial crown (or is it an infernal one?)


but anyway, what good is an elite guard without an ordinary guard?


Voila!
:invasion:
here's your cannon fodder E., just ask if you need more for your 'research'


I work on Kamino!


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


My bad:
iyala.gif
is that better?


Originally posted by kraleck:


167. Bag of Tricks and Traps
The PCs come across a seemingly normal bag of holding. Unfortunately, this bag teleports any item (or person) dropped into the bag (that doesn't exceed its size or weight limits, of course) to a dungeon filled to the brim with deadly traps. Preferably ones by Ravenwood and myself.


168. Pride Will Give You A Swelled Head
The PCs will come across a hat/headband/helmet that has plenty of unlimited major powers. Although when it is used, people viewing its use will give compliments despite how much they may hate the user. This triggers the headgear's special curse. Whenever the wearer is complimented, be it from the powers of the headgear or general praise for accomplishments, the headgear caused the wearer's head to swell slightly. After 25 compliments the headgear cannot be removed. After 50 the wearer takes a -2 penalty to Concentration for every 10 compliments past 40. Finally, after 100 compliments, the wearer's head is subject to an implosion effect. The wearer must make a Fortitude save or lose his/her head. Even if they make the save, they now take a -2 penalty to Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma. There is a way to nullify the effects of the headgear: they must take their swell-headed friend to a witch doctor in a swamp and have him shrink their head. This also has repercussions as the witch doctor shrinks the PC's head too far. This doesn't kill the PC, but it will make them have to buy new hats.


169. Escher's Revenge
The PCs will walk into a strange room with numbered staircases and numbered doors heading in every direction (Up, Down, Side-to-Side, Upside-Down, you name it, they must navigate it). The PCs will have to navigate their way through this mess while throwing switches to change the way the doors connect and the locations of the stairs. This is best used to kill time while you think up tough monsters for them to fight when they leave through the door they came in. It won't take them back to the place before this room, it takes them to a different chamber for each switch combination (some different combinations lead to the same place, only one leads to the original entrance and the true exit).


Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:


170. Have the PCs come across a door with no method of being opened except for a curious riddle: "The Eldritch Syllable is your key." The party wizard will probably waste every spell he has prepared on this door, to no avail.
The solution? Eventually one of the PCs might realize that "Eldritch Syllable" means the same as "Magic Word." Some time after that a PC might remember what they were taught in kindergarten, and that the magic word is please. If you're truly a cruel DM, have a monster or sphere of annihilation or something materialize on the other side of the door if the PCs don't say "thank you" as well.


Originally posted by boozerker:


A nice command is often heard, less than a cantrip this magic word.


Originally posted by boozerker:


#171: Catapult Slam.


PCs arrive at a door that opens at its top, swinging down to rest on the floor -- so long as someone stands on it. When the PC has nearly crossed the door's length, it springs shut with the force of a catapult, slamming the PC into the stone wall above.


Other PCs behind the first one simply get tossed down the corridor they came from.


Mean additions: When the PC falls from having slammed the wall, the door crashes back down on top of PC before rising shut again.


The trap releases a pack of monsters from the far end of the corridor, so remaining PCs have to get past the door quickly or face the new danger.


Originally posted by cog_and_taz:


172:A humble pit trap... or is it?


Good ol' pit trap, except that when the PCs fall in, their fall is broken by a jellylike substance, which begins to eat away at their equipment and is, in fact, several black puddings. The look on their face when all their equipment is melted is priceless.


173: Don't be greedy.


The PCs come across a door, which has the following written on it: "Show greed, and you shall be smitten. Forsake your worldly possesions, and you shall be rewarded with greatness." or some such. Point is, if they walk through carrying gold, gems or any such valuables, it's disintegrated. If they carry magic items in, mordenkainen's disjunction. If they dump it all before they walk through though, it's teleported over to them once they pass, and they get an ability increase of their choice(IE +1 to any one stat.)


Originally posted by kraleck:


Sorry folks, another number mix-up thanks to boozerker this time (sorry for singling you out, pal). Should be:
171. Catapult Slam.
172. A humble pit trap... or is it?
173. Don't be greedy.
Just a reminder to carefully watch the numbering.


And now back to your regularly scheduled trap.


174. See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil...Or Else...
The PCs come to a room with piles of treasure behind forcecages with a sign that says: "Spite thy friends aloud and thou shall receive." Speaking a command word to activate an effect that dispels the walls or speaking words to spite the other PCs will release an invisible Evil creature from one of the forcecages and activate a Silence effect centered on it.


Originally posted by boozerker:


Jerk..


And you know what else?
[sblock];) You're not.[/sblock]


Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:


175. The PCs walk into a hallway with metal strips running parallel to each other down the length of the hall, charged with static electricity. When they're about halfway down the hall the door behind them slams shut and a very large, very metal ball starts rolling towards them. And with the help of the charged strips, it's now a very large, very metal, very magnetic ball. Fun for the party tank, especially since at the end of the hallway there's an open pit. I figure the Jump DC for it should be increased by at least 15 since it's pretty much like trying to jump across something with bungee cords attached to your back.


Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:


176. For convenience, let's assume a typical party of 4: fighter, rogue, wizard, cleric. At the end of the hallway is two doors and a chain. One door has no method of being opened (yet), and the other can be opened by pulling the chain, but since the door's heavy it'll require a high strength check, though nothing outside the tank's range. As soon as one person (assume rogue) enters through the door, it slams shut and the chain is pulled upward sharply. The tank, holding onto the chain, will have some insentive to continue doing so: soveirgn glued to the chain, a short pit with a sphere of annihilation at the bottom, etc. At this point the door the rogue went into can't be opened, but the other door can. The cleric and wizard will rush through that door, and are promptly seperated as a wall rises between them and the floor tilts 90 degrees.
Now the party is completely seperated, and each PC is facing their own weakness. For the tank, it's a riddle, the answer to which must be spelled out by swinging the chain and pressing lettered tiles on the walls, probably requiring both Int and Dex checks. Every incorrect letter casts heat metal on the chain. Oh, and the letters are in Druidic :D For the rogue, it's a straight-up fight in a brightly-lit room. Or it could be a roleplaying encounter (they will revise their character in short odrer after this, maxing out Diplomacy). For the cleric, a stealth encounter: maybe sneaking around a sleeping monster or something similar. And for the wizard, a pit to jump or fly across, with an antimagic field across it.


Originally posted by makuya:


176. For convenience, let's assume a typical party of 4: fighter, rogue, wizard, cleric. At the end of the hallway is two doors and a chain. One door has no method of being opened (yet), and the other can be opened by pulling the chain, but since the door's heavy it'll require a high strength check, though nothing outside the tank's range. As soon as one person (assume rogue) enters through the door, it slams shut and the chain is pulled upward sharply. The tank, holding onto the chain, will have some insentive to continue doing so: soveirgn glued to the chain, a short pit with a sphere of annihilation at the bottom, etc. At this point the door the rogue went into can't be opened, but the other door can. The cleric and wizard will rush through that door, and are promptly seperated as a wall rises between them and the floor tilts 90 degrees.
Now the party is completely seperated, and each PC is facing their own weakness. For the tank, it's a riddle, the answer to which must be spelled out by swinging the chain and pressing lettered tiles on the walls, probably requiring both Int and Dex checks. Every incorrect letter casts heat metal on the chain. Oh, and the letters are in Druidic :D For the rogue, it's a straight-up fight in a brightly-lit room. Or it could be a roleplaying encounter (they will revise their character in short odrer after this, maxing out Diplomacy). For the cleric, a stealth encounter: maybe sneaking around a sleeping monster or something similar. And for the wizard, a pit to jump or fly across, with an antimagic field across it.
No way around it, and no way to defeat it. You are cruel beyond my expectation.
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SuperTD

Explorer
[sblock=Page 7] Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Deleted! Made a mistake...

Originally posted by solo_phoenix:

And what happens when the rogue tries to pull the chain first, not knowing that it needs a high strength check? :p

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Then he's still stuck to the chain, and if he does somehow get the door open he'll still get yanked through the ceiling, and he still doesn't know Druidic. But it makes the tank's challenge easier.
Or, if the tank tries to help him, they're both stuck, and they both still don't know Druidic.

Originally posted by boundlesslimits:

I think this will be #31: The door that
bites back...

33: The door of Confusion

This trap gave my PCs one hell of a time. It appears to be made completely out of glass and the PC's reflections show, so they can't see through it. Technically this is a mirror of opposition. The door only allows one person to go through at one time. When a PC goes through, he open the door, steps through and the door slams behind him. He has just entered a room facing the rest of his party. Wait for some "what the hell" 's to be murmured from the rest of the party but it goes like this.
There is a party just like you, but of completely opposite alignments. When one PC goes through the door, their member of the bizarro party, goes through too, and finds himself facing what looks like his party, while the PC is on the other side looking at what he thinks is his own party, but is really the Bizarro party. But they don't know that, and it is almost guarenteed that multiple PC's will go through the door, go back through the door, and so on, until they finally realize they're dealing with their opposites, and must fight (now would be a good time to drop hints about the opposing party being evil, or good, whichever...) And now you must fight, but they're so damn mixed up, nobody knows who's who anymore.
This is a very confusing trap, however, it works as a great encounter.

Party On, Dudes!
fireball.gif
i had an additional idea of this one, but i need some help of thinking of a way out of this trap.

the party enters a large room with 3 doors(of any size to hold the entire party), the door they just came through shuts behind them.
"you have 3 doors:"
1 door you just came through,
2 doors on the opposite side of the room.

one of those doors are locked and can only be opened on the other side.
when the half of the party(lets call these one party#1) enters the other door, the door shuts, leaving the rest in the large room(party#2), and the other half in a hallway.

(party#1 in the hallway)
on the other side of the room (so in the walkway)
the party opens the door and enters a room, like just one as they came through, and has the same numbers of enemies as lost party members #2

(party#2, in the room) same time
other door unlocks and the same numbers of enemies as lost party#1 members enter the room, they look like shadow's.

$doors are locked behind them$ :D

every time someone moves in real, a shadow will move on the other side. hitting a shadow will do the same damage on allies on the other side, (because he will be hit by a shadow)

so basically they are hitting each other. with no actual knowledge of it

does anyone have any idea of getting out of this trap?:surrender

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Sure, both sides of the party will probably eventually realize that these foes are too powerful for them. Then they surrender... Then when the shadows representing those characters surrender, the shadows will disappear... or something.

Originally posted by kraleck:

Wow...#176 is...uh, well...I just can't find the words to describe its awesomeness. It'll put thoughts of clever multiclassing into the heads of a few players experiencing shame from that one.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

Yeah, it's fairly good. One thing I rather everyone remembered though, keep it realistic, assuming the BBEG or who/whatever would want to pass once in a while, how would they go about it? Does their castle have giant turtles and a back door?(jumbo cookie if you get the reference.)

Point is, don't make it impassable/impossible unless absolutely no one is supposed to go through. Even then, give em a sporting chance will ya?

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

First off, Kraleck, I'm honored.
Second, it isnt quite impassible/impossible. I'll explain more later, but except for the fighter nothing is out of the character's reach.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

Okay, thanks, just saying.

Originally posted by kraleck:

177. Batteries Not Included
The PCs find a powerful wand that has a very strong magical aura. The PCs will detect a very powerful fireball spell (Maximized Fireball) in the wand with an indeterminate amount of charges. The PCs will encounter a group of monsters that are weak to the spell, but too many to eliminate with one casting. When the monsters' numbers are thinned by the spell they will go berserk and attack the PCs en masse. When the PCs try to cast the spell again, the wand sparks weakly and sputters out. The wand has activated another charge of a different spell on it: Delayed Blast Fireball with a 3 round delay centered on the wand.

178. Some Assembly Required
The PCs will encounter a weird box with a message written on a broken tablet inside. The message cannot be read without piecing the tablet together. This will take some Wisdom checks to piece together properly. When the PCs get tablet pieces to fit properly, the pieces meld together. The message says: "You just pieced this together and all you got is a worthless message." The message is worthless, but the tablet is not. What they don't know is the tablet is made of raw, rare metal. The tablet in its raw form will attract every rust monster within a 1 mile radius.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

firstly ive got to say that this is a brilliant resource which i plan to annoy my PCs with alot until they learn that its not all about charging in and tearing, hacking and smashing anything with a pluse(including the undead) into tiny pieces.

179? i think,

a pit trap,

Essentially a pit trap with a twist.

pit trap with swing open doors on 10' by 10' in the middle of the corridor, when activated the PC's who are on it fall through and down a 100ft shaft of smooth stone, at the bottem is essentially a trampiline. Once theyve finished bouncing around they should notice there are two rope ladders, next to each other on the far side wall. This rope ladder is wide enough for one PC. When one PC puts their weight onto a particular rung, the of the ladder The PC climbing the other ladder will find that the section of the ladder they are climbing on falls away, with them on it. The PCs will have to work out when to cross over to the other ladder to and back again to miss the trap rungs.

This will take them time to climb out off.

if you want to add some pain for them try putting in thin wooden landings that the PC's crash through when they fall in to the trap.

dont know if anyone will be able to understand this but hey just a crazy idea.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

As promised, the solution to #176. Those who want to suspend disbelief that this trap is a perfect TPK, please disregard this post.

In theory only the tank has a good chance of dying. The rogue should have a wand of invisibility or similar magic item that can be used with Use Magical Device and encourages independence from the wizard. With that he can set up for a sneak attack. The wizard was never required to fly over the pit; it's only a suggestion, and the pit's only 10 feet wide. He could instead cast Bull's strength for a boost on his jump check and pray that the forces of fate are with him tonight. Alternatively, if he already fell into the pit he could spider climb his way out. As for the cleric, a simple silence spell should do the trick. The monster stays asleep and he walks around looking for an exit at his leisure. The fighter, however, just has to get really lucky or have some nice fire resistance items.
The whole purpose of this trap is to encourage players to think outside of the cliches of their class. The chain trap is much less dangerous if the druid wildshapes into a bear and opens the door for the fighter to go in first. Then the rogue would probably wind up in the room with the sleeping monster, and the other character deals with the pit. Everyone plays to their strength: The druid, knowing druidic; the fighter, kicking ass; the rogue, sneaking; and anyone else, thinking outside the box.

Originally posted by kraleck:

Loken, we like crazy ideas. That is what makes some traps so great.

180. Look Behind You and Watch Your Step
The PCs enter a room that seems to be no larger than a walk-in closet. When they turn around to leave they hear a loud rumbling as if the wall they just turned their backs to just moved. If they turn to face the wall, the wall is still where they left it. Turn around again, the wall rumbles again. Repeat until they figure out they have to walk backwards through the wall (which is only viewable from one side). This gives them no idea of where they are walking, which just happens to be towards a deep pit half full of caltrops. If they fall in, they take multiple light piercing damages and take penalties to all movements and physical motion based skills until they are healed.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

Hello my fellow PC manipulators, I have returned from a weekend long trip to deep in the heart of the Mid-west. I have not the time to post any new traps at the moment, but have seen that in my absence you all have flourished.
P.S. Kraleck, I have ran your traps across the PC's of my latest campaign, and they now have a deep dark resenting hatred towards you, so....
dancin.gif
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CONGRATULATIONS
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Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

181. The floor of a portion of the hallway is pretty much flagstone on paper and can't hold any more than its own weight. The first PC to step on it falls into a fairly deep pit. Not too bad, if the walls of the pit weren't paper. Look in the DMG p. 60. Paper has a Climb DC of 30, and I have a houserule based on common sense that a failed Climb check on a paper wall tears the wall down. Behind the paper walls are another set of walls -- 10-20 feet back from the original pit so the PCs have to make Jump checks from the wall to grab onto the ledge above.
182. As #181, but crueler. Behind the paper walls about 2 inches is a thick sheet of glass. Keep in mind, a perfectly smooth, vertical surface can't be climbed as stated in the PHB. There's no light in the pit, so aside from darkvision there's no way for the PCs to tell what's behind the glass. They can, however, see light from torches on the row of masonry walls about 20 feet away. Since the glass can't be climbed, the only way out is to break down the glass walls. The glass walls holding back an incredible amount of water. The torches were, of course, continual flames.

Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

180. Look Behind You and Watch Your Step
Which is why one should ALWAYS carry a "small steel mirror"
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183 - The group walks into a nice looking throneroom, which contains a large stone chair with two arm length hole in the arm rests, right at the back, where one would place his elbows.

The are obvious pictures of a man sticking his arms in there to open a secret door (one the PC's need to take.) So, any pc with his level in gp will know it's a dumb idea to stick your arms in there, but the contructions is thus that only a humanoid hand will work (palms upward with fingers pushing buttons etc)

Once the PC does stick his arms in, the secret door opens. When the hands are removed again, a poisonous gas is released and the doors closed again. To hurry things up a bit here, opening the door also releases several scary monsters. Now one strognest PC (fighter) is stuck on the chair. with the party facing strong monsters.

I preferr the poisonous gas over being really stuck. Variations on this theme could include the one who used the chair to be immune to the poison, and the party in truly dire need.

Originally posted by kraleck:

P.S. Kraleck, I have ran your traps across the PC's of my latest campaign, and they now have a deep dark resenting hatred towards you, so....
dancin.gif
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CONGRATULATIONS
dancin.gif
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Excuse me while I run outside and cackle with pleasure at the top of my lungs.

*10 minutes later*

And now for another trap...

184. Useless Books Library
The PCs come across a very expansive Library filled with useless/defective spell scrolls and Tomes that SUBTRACT from Intelligence and a second ability score. The books and scrolls detect as strong beneficial magic when they are non-beneficial.

P.S. Alcari Ambaron, you've never met the guys I play with. Better players and they never encounter the bad stuff I do. My DM has been my best friend for years and the others have played slightly longer than him. They never carry mundane gear like mirrors or rope and are fine throughout the session. I prepare wisely and die quickly and rapidly.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

185. A moderately deep pit with two rope ladders running down opposite walls, and a piece of paper on the ground. The piece of paper explains the real danger behind this trap: The rope ladders, connected at the top of the shaft into the wall, run throug a series of pulleys connecting the two rope ladders and a section of the ceiling directly above the pit. If the weight is unbalanced on the rope ladders as little as 25 pounds, the ropes are cut and the ceiling section falls, completely covering the opening at the top. The PCs in the hole will have to divide their gear among themselves equally according to weight or be trapped forever. Especially fun with a halfling or gnome in the pit.
Please note that the trap blueprint at the bottom of the hole is purely to give the PCs a fighting chance and is optional. Adjust what the paper says at your discretion to a cryptic message or a shopping list, or just not have it at all. For the record, I chose the shopping list :D

Originally posted by kraleck:

186. Polevault of Progressing Peril
The PCs must polevault from loose column to loose column without falling into a pool with (Enemy CR = to PCs' CR) worth of dire crocodiles or sharks (whatever floats your cruel fancy). There are 5x(# of PCs) poles and only (# of PCs) poles will not break when used. The columns will shift when more than half the PCs land on them and fall over when anyone vaults off. Each column is a foot higher than the previous and the dire beasts will bite to shorten the poles by a few feet when the poles provoke attacks of opportunity from the beasts. This increases the Jump DCs progressively. There is the possibility of sniping the dire beasts, but this will take a while because of cover from the lip of each column top and the murkiness of the water granting concealment.

187. Like Cutting a Worm in Half
The PCs enter a long, wide tunnel and see a troll wearing a ring on each hand. When the troll charges down the center of tunnel at the PCs, a vertical blade zips from the troll's starting end of the tunnel, severs the troll's body in half, and continues towards the PCs (Reflex Save to avoid massive slashing damage). The troll with two rings now becomes two trolls with a single ring. The rings are Greater Elemental Resistance Rings: one fire, one acid.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

186. Polevault of Progressing Peril
I'm planning on using this in my next adventure. None of my players have mad hops at all!

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

188. A room filled with magic armor and weapons, coins, and metallic art objects, but also with an unlockable iron door on the side opposite the PCs. The door looks like a vault door, with a wheel in the center of it obviously meant to open the door. It can be turned counter-clockwise, but not clockwise. After about 20 rotations, the wheel dislodges from the door and it's true purpose becomes very apparent very fast. The wheel was actually acting as a cork, holding back a large amount of acid that only dissolves organic material.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

189. Venus Human Trap

The PC's enter a square room about 50x50 feet with weird disigns all over the floor. Every ten feet there is a small white circular tile in the floor, and a few feet out on either side is a circle that surrounds it (kind of like this (o) )
Anyway, this trap works best if a fight occurs in this room between the PC's and their opposition.
The thing is, as soon as someone steps on the circular tile in the middle, they get a reflex save of about 18 to dodge the trap. When the tile is stepped on, the circle surrounding it suddenly springs from the floor and slams together, like a large bear trap, hitting the PC in the midsection, dealing 3d8 bludgeoning damage.
This is real good to use in a fight situation because the henchmen their fighting can set them off too, or bate them into the traps. Smart PC's learn how to use them to their advantage.
Have fun!:D

Originally posted by kraleck:

190. Flower Garden...From Hell
The pursued PCs should find a large courtyard, greenhouse, or hedge maze filled with exotic plants. The plants can and will attack anybody who enters their reach. There are assassin vines with exotic flowers with tempting scents and delicious fruit, giant flytraps that tangle and reel in victims with tendrils, pitcher plants that slither towards prey with shiny, coin-like lures, roses that thrash about and lash out at all who approach, sunflowers that shoot poison-barbed seeds, and water lillies that snare and drag prey underwater. They do not attack the Evil Druid who planted them, nor the owner of the estate. They have to work their way through this garden to escape their pursuit.

Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

pitcher plants that slither towards prey with shiny, coin-like lures
bwahahaha, this is so going to be used in my next campaign, purely for the fact that the pc's will feel like total idiots for falling for it. Outsmarted by a plant :p

The wheel was actually acting as a cork, holding back a large amount of acid that only dissolves organic material.
nice, but, small addendum, cork IS an organic material.

191 - Faulty equiment

The Pc's have to cross a rickety bridge, which will collapse when more then [character + armor + gear] cross it. so, the only option will be to drag it on a rope. However, the bridge itself is a cunning trap.

When a pressure plate has been pressed a certain number of times (equal to number of players, or maybe one more or less), two blades slice out from the ground in front of the bridge, cutting the bridge as well as any ropes the party may have to drag their armor and gear.

Players get far more ****** when you hit them where it really hurts, not their HP but their gear
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Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

This I don't need:

A large unlit room, dusty and absolutely blanketed in spiderweb. There are great murals on the wall, but thick ropes of grayish web cover everything. A chest sits on a raised platform in the middle of the room, stuck shut with the stuff.

Buried in the webbing somewhere out of sight are monstrous spider egg sacs which, if left alone, still have weeks to gestate. However, if the players try to burn the webbing...

Smoke fills the room, obscuring vision and choking the PCs. The flames spread rapidly and sear away the web. The spiders burst forth from their egg sacs but catch flame! This doesn't deter them. The flaming swarms of spiders descend on anyone unfortunate enough to get in their way.

Players being attacked by a swarm of flaming spiders also catch flame. Both parties take the standard d6 every round in addition to any damage they might otherwise recieve in combat.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

nice, but, small addendum, cork IS an organic material.
I think you missed the point, Alcari Ambaron. I didn't say the screw was a cork, merely acting as one in the sense that it's holding back several thousand gallons of highly dangerous liquid.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

193. Willey Pete

The PC's enter a large square room, maybe 30'X30' or so. There is a small pool of water off in one corner, but what is really eye catching is a huge clay pot hanging from the high ceiling. The pot is attatched to a rope that leads to a pulley to the ceiling, which leads down to a gromit about shoulder height in the wall. Above said gromit is the message "Release all anguish and your pride to receive white treasure that lies inside"
The knot is seared, old, and appears to have no end pieces anywhere, kind of a Gordian Knot type thing going on ( Use Rope 35 to untie or so ) The point is eventually the PC's are going to get impatient to get the white treasure inside, which they probably assume is platinum, but you know what happens when PC's ASSUME...(wink, wink)
If by some stroke of luck the PC's get the knot out and lower the pot, on the lid (which is sealed) is the letters and numbers: P4 O10 and under that is the words: Willey Pete.
Smart people should relize that this is the atomic structure and the nickname of White Phosphorus. A layman might not relize that an alchemist would pay a crap-ton (actual monetary unit, not joking) for a few hundred pounds of the stuff. (hence the "white treasure" remark.
However, if the PC's cut the rope to get the White Treasure inside, the pot falls, crashes, and the moment the Willey Pete hits air, it lights up, dealing 2d10 damage a round they stay in the grasp of oxygen. The only way they can put the stuff out is by denying it Oxygen, so they can all dive into the pool to do so, however, they will need to remain in the water for about 6 or more rounds to get it completely out.
Now your PC's are wet, covered in chemical burns, and known to happy.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

194. Ba Ram You!

This is a good trap to spring on that certain someone who thinks the trap is going to be a lot more complex, and then kick themselves in the a$$ when they spring it.
Put the artifact, relic, etc, the PCs are adventuring for, or come across, in a small circular room with lots of tiles, a big design on the wall with holes in it, basically a lot of signs of viable traps that look likely to spring out at any second. This will cause many a PC to be very weary. The relic, artifact, what ever, sits in the hands of a statue of a mythical beast with the body of a man and the head of a ram. The statue is made of stone and stands about the same height as the PC with his head is bowed. When the PC has taken all the time in the world to check and make sure it's safe, as soon as he/she lifts the artifact from the statue's hands, the head shoots forward and decks the PC in the face. This incurs 1: a broken nose, 2: 2d6 actual damage + 3d10 subdual damage, and 3: dazed for 2d4 rounds and blinded for 1d4 rounds.
Plus some hurt pride is also in order, but they'll get over it...after they gouge your eyes out with their D8.
Heh Heh Heh:D

Originally posted by vader_rocks:

194. Ba Ram You!
That's just mean...

I love it!
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Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

195.The gold walks: The PCs walk into a room full of treasure, on e of the things there is a mound of gold, definitely worth about 12000gp total(more or less according to party level). As they approach to take it, the gold begins to hiss, clink and melt into a single puddle before rising into the shape of a golem, which smacks em up. The stats are as a stone golem, but drop the AC down by 2~3 as gold is softer. There is also a sheath for a CL 11 scorching ray wand which requires no UMD check and is destroyed with the golem, plus a reflective section of the armor which can do all kinds of nifty magic, such as the following (silent image to make the entrance "cease to exist", fear "as you watch the golem, you see your faces reflected on its armor. Before long, your faces become twisted and contorted in horrible ways, roll will saves" etc etc.), endless fun and no one expects it. Oh, and for the first two rounds, 2d6 fire damage from attacking it unarmed, getting hit by it or grappling it as it's still hot from being melted together.

Originally posted by kraleck:

196. The Mummy Strikes
The PCs are travelling in an Egyptian style tomb. Lead them to a preparation chamber with a twist. The last person to try to leave the chamber gets separated from the group and is attacked by the animated tools and is bandaged like a mummy. The bandages create a realistic illusion of a mummy down to the appearance of dried, withered flesh. These bandages will force the trapped PC to attack his allies when they force the door open and will burn for 2d6 rounds when they come in contact with any kind of fire. The rest of the PCs should waste most of their fire spells fighting the "mummy" only to later find out they just incinerated their ally. When the bandages start to burn, they cause the PC to slowly lurch towards their allies and the flaming victim will scream uncontrollably. This also causes their allies to hear angry moaning from the bandages that drown out the poor sap's screaming.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

Ouch, that is nasty! Now for the next one... beware, humor ahead!

197: the vorpal bunny(I had to)

Throughout a dungeon, give hints that the final room is guarded by some uber-monster, in the final room, there will be precisely one cute fluffy and utterly terrified bunny. Be overly descriptive about it, and how they sense no evil or power from it, it's just an ordinary bunny. Also, litter the room with skeletons, and have the bunny stare at them constantly. Grin alot, and if they ask you something like "okay, so what is it really?" say "what do you mean? it's just a bunny!". Eventually, roll will saves all around in secret, and for those who make it, they see nothing. Those who fail see the bunny's "true form", a flaming horned menacing demon or whatever, be very descriptive and make it seem really tough(note: this is an illusion). Once they burn all their spells and so on on it, the real boss materializes behind them.

Originally posted by egodefluo:

198. Sacrifice

This is a variation on a "room filling with water trap." The PCs enter a room, where the door slams shut behind them (of course). In the middle of the room is a group of statues of poor children who are obviously crying and a paladin standing in front of them and a door on the other side. If the PCs turn their backs on the children they all start crying and begin to fill the room with water.

To disarm the trap, they must search the statues and find that their hands actually have slots on them that fit coins. When a sufficient amount of weight of coins (or value) has been put into the slots, they hear a click and the door swings open, possibly sweeping them through if there was enough water in the room.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

199. You're Yankin' Me

This is yet another trap that includes a mysterious rope hanging down through a tunnel in the ceiling. I relize I have quite a few of these, so much so that my PC's do not even bother with them anymore, but this is a good twist.
The PC's enter a small square room to find that appently the only way up is to climb this rope, with is pretty thick, and even has a bunch of slack laying on the ground. The only thing is it's laced through a pulley system much like those on a set of blinds. As soon as a PC puts his weight on the rope, it releases the catch for the pulley and is not carrying a whole lot of weight, the rope suddenly jerks up and takes the PC for a quick ride about 80 feet up.
The trap part comes when the PC gets to the top. If he doesn't let go, he gets pulled into the pulley system, taking 3d6 damage and a good chance at losing some fingers.
When I ran this trap, I also had the PC roll a 50% chance to get tangled in the rope, so he fell back down, hit the ground, and then jerked the rope again, pulling him back up.
I though it was quite comical, but he didn't...funny.

And the BIG FAT NUMBRO 200!!! (I'll try to do it proud)

200. Flat on yo' Face

The PC's enter a long narrow hallway, about twenty feet wide by about 120 feet long. The hall is empty, has stone floors, and is completely dark. At the other end of the hall way, the hall ends in a dead end with a huge panel of old, rusty, jagged spikes stiking out of it. When the PC's hit the halfway point, the floor suddenly gives away on a huge set of hinges, and the tunnel suddenly falls 90 degrees down, sending the PC's sailing down to the bottom, which now happens to be a bed of spikes. Hitting these babies incurs 5d6 worth of damage (not including falling damage), and if the PC's haven't gotten a tetnus shot recently, a pretty nasty infection.
Now that the floor is covered in spikes, they must now find a way to climb back up to the top, and get over the edge, and back on normal ground, but then phase two of the trap comes into place.
If the PC fails the climb check to get out by more than five, he falls back down to the pit of spikes incurring the appropriate falling damage, and another 5d6 spike damage.
This is a very good trap that sadistic BBEG should have in his basement somewhere. Very good for ticking off the PC's, but hey, which of all of our traps doesn't?
If this trap doesn't sound sadistic enough, try snickering Bwe-he-he through the whole thing, kind of drives it home :D

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

201. Workin' My Way Back to You

The PC's enter a long narrow room (sound familiar) It is about ten feet by 100 feet long, and as they walk into it, they see that the hall ends with a wall in a dead end with bed of spikes pointing out of it. Now that little alarm bells are going off in their heads, they head back for the door. When they're about to reach it, it suddenly slams shut, and the sound of lots of locking sounds off from inside it. They see there are about half a dozen different types of locks on it. At this point, they now hear what sounds like ancient gears being rattled back to life, and a low scraping sound from down the hall. The wall of spikes is inching towards them a gaining speed.
The rogue needs to work fast on these locks, because each one needs an open lock check of 35 or more and take about 3 rounds each to work on them, and the wall is moving towards the PC's at about 5 feet a round.
The other PC's who aren't crapping their pants can also try to stall the wall of spikes by jamming stuff in it's path. If there is now rogue in the party, they can either admitt defeat and die, or jam the wall to a stop for 5 or more rounds, incurring the machinery driving it to blow apart, destroying the door, and opening a way to get out.
Works as a good psychological trap.
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Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

202. Another long hallway, with another 10-foot wide pit covered by a double trapdoor. When the PCs are about 3/4 of the way down the hall, that's when it starts getting fun. (The pit, by the way, is about 1/4 down the hall.) The floor, starting at the pit, is essentially a very large balance. Once the PCs are on the other half of it, the weight unbalances and drops the PCs into a pit. But the trapdoor from the first pit is still open and can be climbed up to. However, once a PC reaches the top of the wall (at the trapdoor), the weight unbalances again, tossing the PC at the top into the first pit, and scooping everyone in the second up and throwing them into the ceiling, of which the section at the end of the hall happens to be another spring-loaded trapdoor (that is, it will only open from below), possibly with spikes on the other side so they're thrown up through the trapdoors, then carried back down onto the spikes. There's a hallway leading away from the ceiling door, but part of that is on a balance too. The part directly above the first pit.:D

Originally posted by kraleck:

203. Rubik's Tiamat's-Breath-Cube
The PCs enter a 55x55x35 (L-W-H) room and see a translucent multi-colored cube (25 foot perfect cube) floating in the center. When they get within 5 feet of the cube, they are teleported inside and must solve the cube. They should spend about 3 rounds figuring out the mechanics of the cube. There is a smaller, solid cube identical to the larger cube they are trapped in that shifts the colors and turns the outer cube as it turns and shifts. The thing is, solving the entire cube causes the yellow side to disappear and turns the black, green, white, blue, and red sides into phantom dragon heads with real breath weapons. The PCs must escape through the yellow side within 1d4+1 rounds and take cover. This is simple if the yellow side was vertical when solved. If yellow was on the bottom, they must make Escape Artist checks to slide under the walls of the cube. If yellow was on top, they must make Climb checks to climb out of the cube. When the 5 breath weapons converge, the cube overloads and explodes dealing simultaneous 2d6 fire, 2d6 cold, 2d6 electricity, and 4d6 acid to any thing inside the cube and half that damage to everything within a 25 foot line of sight of the cube. There are 5-foot-wide columns 10 feet away from the walls which provide cover and there is a 5-foot-wide perimeter around the room that is safe from the blast. However, the blast summons 5 Half-Dragon Sorcerers (1 of each Chromatic Dragon type) that the PCs must now fight.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

204. The PCs walk into a big room, and the door slams shut behind them. The room is filled with an assortment of wierd items: a jar of beads, three levers next to each other on one wall, a large pot hanging by a rope from the ceiling, a fountain in the shape of a gargoyle with a stone pitcher next to it, a giant grandfather clock with a key to wind it, seventeen silver door keys of various shapes and sizes, a jade skull, and a tome with a dagger through it. Most curious is a 15-foot cube of thick glass in the center of the room, with an unlockable iron door leading into it. Nothing can be seen through the glass, since the entire cube is filled with thick, swirling fog. Occasionally a face will appear in the fog, but disappear as quickly as it came. On the side of the room opposite the PCs is another unlockable door. As soon as they enter, the temperature of the room will steadily rise, but never above 140F.
The alarm bells in the PC's heads should go off upon walking into the room. If they're anything like mine they will freak out and start searching the entire room for traps and closely examine every single object, trying to determine the purpose it serves in saving them from the certain death the room must bring. Except the levers. The PCs I know are deathly afraid of levers, especially multiple levers, probably for good reason.
The solution? The only thing that serves any purpose in the entire room is the left-most lever. It opens the iron door into the glass chamber. Any PC brave enough to face the perils of the cube will walk through the door, into the fog, and find themselves in a smaller (10-foot cube) room. On the far wall of this room is another lever. This lever, should the brave PC pull it, opens the unlockable door on the far end of the room.
Not really a trap since there's no real danger, more psychological. Good for especially paranoid PCs.

Originally posted by godzilla:

...Inscribed on the floor the PCs are standing, is a simple riddle in common...
...Oh, did I mention that the letters on the tiles are in a language none of the PCs can read :D !...
So which is it?

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Druidic!
(see #176)
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[sblock=Page 8] Originally posted by the_soul_collec...:

This is one of the better threads out there, good job everyone.

Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:

ravenwood i have to say your last few entries were rather disappointing. they were either to real worldy, ignored the rules or were just a spike pit trap (200).

205) the gold room

this requires that the players keep track of their weights and such and that you know how much gold weighs but the trap is:

the pcs walk down a rather long corridor and find at the end a vault. in the vault there is enough room to hold all of them and all of the gold of which there is quite alot several hundred pounds at least. here is where the math comes in. as soon as the weight reaches where it would be if 25gp was removed from the vault it triggers. if there is a pc right next to the vault door and said door is open they get a ref save to get out of the room before it slams into the ceiling (treat as falling ceiling) at the far end of the corridor( to try and trap all of them) a portcolis fell with a long sharp blade on the bottom and about 4 feet farther another not sharpened on falls.

the only way to get out is to return enough gold to the room or just leave dead weight somehow. when the room launches it leaves about 6 inches of open space to allow the return of gold. when enough is added the room lowers and the door opens. clever players will load the gold into a big sack and trail rope out to pull it out of the room once they are clear and real it in. thats where the portculises come into play. the first cuts the rope and the second prevents them from reaching through and grabbing the rope to keep pulling unless they are med size with natural reach

Originally posted by kraleck:

206. You Never Know Someone Until...
The PCs come to a chamber with a large uncut diamond in the center. This diamond appears to be worth much more than a dragon's horde. However, when any of the PCs touches the diamond ask for their mental ability scores and related skills, class abilities, etc. and have them roll "initiative." Have character sheets with their physical scores and gear ready. Tell the PCs by initiative roll to pick a number from 1 to (# of remaining waiting PCs -1), record their mental scores and related skills, class abilities, etc. on that character sheet. When they have all "chosen," give them their new character sheets and say the following: "The Diamond cackles and disappears and you all feel disoriented. You all notice you are standing in different positions than you were, but are still in the chamber. *to PC1*You look around and see yourself looking dumbfounded with (PC-whose-body-PC1-is-now-in's name) nowhere in sight. *to PC2 in PC1's body* (PC1's new body's former name) is looking at you strangely, you see yourself standing next to you. *to PC3 in PC4's body* You see your allies looking around in wonder and feel a strange weight on your chest unlike your armor." Continue this until they figure out what is wrong. They have -2 to attacks, skills, class abilities, AC, etc. for 1d4 days (rolled individually) while they get used to their new bodies. They have all their old combat/metamagic/skill booster feats in their new bodies, but cannot use them if their new bodies have insufficient ability scores. Their new bodies retain any feats relating to their physical form, heritage, and health. This effect lasts until they each walk 100 miles in their friends shoes. This trap helps strengthen the bonds between the PCs.
A word of caution to this tale: Should anybody die while inhabiting their ally's body, they all feel a deep emptiness consuming them. They suffer a -1 penalty to all ability scores for every lost ally until the fallen ally is ressurected. Should all of them die, they roam the land as unturnable "ghosts" begging for help and their bodies turn to dust. Only a Wish or Miracle can return them to physical form, but it cannot return them to their old bodies.

Edit: Just thought of posting the next one after reading post #157 in this thread.

207. Reverse Psychology
After making their way through elaborate traps the PCs come to a large circular room with a cord hanging from the middle of the ceiling. The cord has a message glued to it that reads "PULL ME." The party should be wary of such an obvious trap, but the party's idiot should pull it anyway and cause the ceiling to collapse dealing 15d10 damage.

Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

You'd be surprised how many players will actaully pull ropes that say DO NOT TOUCH. Some may take some precautions though.

"Hitting these babies incurs 5d6 worth of damage, and if the PC's haven't gotten a tetnus shot recently, a pretty nasty infection."
Those must be some pretty scary babies :p

208) EDIT: major rule screwup... nothing to add this time...sorry.

Originally posted by kraleck:

Nothing from me at this time either...except for:
bump.gif


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

First off, I would like to thank tharivol266 for calling me on my previous posts. I will be the first to admit that they were sloppy, and thrown together rather quickly. I apologize, I have not been around a computer very much this last week, and when I have, I had little time to use it. I will try my best to keep my posts up to your, and especially my own, expectations.

That being said, I think this is number 209, correct me if I'm wrong...

209. Knob of Knaughty-ness

The PC's approach a door at the end of a non-discript hallway. The hall should be rather long, and up to 10 feet wide. The door is solid wood with reinforced steel across it, and there is a knob to open it with in the motif of a face ( preferably one that is giving the PC's the raspberry
pbbbtt.gif
)
However, when a PC goes to twist, or pull the knob, the knob comes off in their hand, behind it, a thick white cord leads through a hole in the door where the knob's axle should have been.
If the PC is curious enough, which most of them are, they will continue to pull the rope, and it will keep coming. However, what they don't know is they are actually winding the trap. A huge log is hanging just in front of the door on the opposite side connected by a rope laced through a series of pulleys, the one the PC is pulling on, and is unknowingly, drawing the log back further and further.
Eventually, after X amount of rounds go by, the PC either gets bored, and lets go, or the rope snaps from tension, but either way, the log is release, and slams through the door. Anyone directly in front of the door take 3d8 damage and must roll a Fort save of 14 or be knocked unconscious, and are thrown back 10 feet. The others behind them must watch for flying PC's, being hit by one incurrs 1d6 worth of damage, plus a 1d8 worth of damage from flying wood, steel, and splinters.
This is a good way to surprise PC's who have dealt with only mild traps, like pits, darts, and poisoned arrows. Makes for a nice wake up call:D

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

It may be a tad mild, but I like it! Definitely back up to your regular standard E, glad to see it. Oh, and I think I will be using it on my PCs:evillaugh

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

It may be a tad mild, but I like it! Definitely back up to your regular standard E, glad to see it. Oh, and I think I will be using it on my PCs:evillaugh
Your support is always appreciated, I hope your PC's hate it!
cool.gif


Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

First off, I would like to thank tharivol266 for calling me on my previous posts. I will be the first to admit that they were sloppy, and thrown together rather quickly. I apologize, I have not been around a computer very much this last week, and when I have, I had little time to use it. I will try my best to keep my posts up to your, and especially my own, expectations.

That being said, I think this is number 209, correct me if I'm wrong...

209. Knob of Knaughty-ness
It should be 208, because the original 208 decided his was unruleful. Just letting ya know.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

E, after using that trap, I decided to blame you personally for my getting punched in the face, it took a day of bedrest for it to heal...

Originally posted by kraleck:

Ugh. Hate being sick, will keep this short as possible.

209. Dungeons, Dragons, and Dartboards
The PCs will find tiny curtains with holes behind them that look into the next room. The PCs will hear the sounds of metal striking cork past the wall. There are 20 holes evenly spaced from a center hole. If someone pokes their head through a hole to see what is in the next room (the only way to see into the next room) they get a nasty surprise. They are caught by stocks (medieval punishment device, people are bound at the neck and wrists by two hinged planks (carved to fit a person's neck and wrists, of course) that have a lock to secure the prisoner), but only at the neck, and they now provoke an attack of opportunity from a slightly tipsy dragon throwing +1 Keen Returning Darts of considerable size. They can scream all they want, but their allies cannot hear them too well through the dartboard (-8 to Listen checks). When they see their ally thrashing about, they should start panicking.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Finally thought of one good enough to post. This one's for the psions and the paladins...
210. A large, circular room with statues of golden brains (or illithid heads) on pillars evenly spaced around the room at intervals of about 10 feet, facing inwards, and a door on the other side (locked). Around a 20-foot circle in the center of the room, directly in front of each statue, is a small gold knob, like the lights on the front of a stage but without the light. The statues are surrouded by null psionics fields such that the fields just overlap (the room is big enough that there is about a 20-foot circle in the center of the room without a field over it, and the path to the center is clear for psionics as well), and the knobs are constantly manifesting detect psionics towards the circle. If a sensor detects psionics, it triggers a contaigon effect. The disease: Cascade flu. Each of the sensors detects psionics simultaneously, so there are plenty of opportunities to contract it. Cascade flu has no initial effect, so the psionicist will have no idea he contracted it. Now we wait until the psionicist manifests a power. Keep in mind that a psionicist with Cascade Flu has no control over his psionics after the first one. After the initial detection, the sensors have another consequence for psionics: a Lightning Bolt, or some other damaging spell is fired from the statue directly behind each sensor. Needless to say, there'll be a lot of lightning flying around. The only way to avoid certain death is to jump into the null psionics fields around the statues. Unfortunately, that isn't the only field around the statues. There's also an emanation of electricity surrounding them, for (I'll be nice:schemes
smile.gif
1d4 damage per round until the psionicist is burned out. Once the sensors haven't detected psionics for 2 minutes straight, the door on the other side of the room opens, to a monster with heavy spell resistance or immunity.
devil.gif

Suddenly, remove disease becomes a good idea...:D

*EDIT:* Wow, lot of rules problems in there. Hope I got them all.

Originally posted by kraleck:

211. Mudhole Mayhem
The PCs should be travelling through a wet and muddy jungle-like environment. Torrential rains have caused several pits to partially fill with mud. The ground is slick in some areas and slows movement in others as the mud sucks the PCs down as they move. This makes travelling difficult and combat with the Dire Crocodiles and Huge Constrictor-type Snakes makes this even worse. The mudpits take quite some effort to escape and the beasts will take attacks of opportunity against anybody climbing out. There are other dangers as some mudpits have punji spikes in the bottom and some vines that the PCs can use to escape the pits are Assassin Vines.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Hello all, I have been reading this forum for quite a while, and I thought I should chip in my two sense, so, without further ado:

212. The Cold Shoulder
the PCs walk into a room, and the first one in steps on a panel(preferablly the Tank) and is surrounded by a square, hollowed out pillar of force(make the Caster level high enough to be undispelable to any of the party's casters). then a trapdoor above the pillar opens, and out pours water, filling the pillar up in X minutes(whatever you like really, but do try to keep it short, just enough to make them squirm), but keep in mind the water is opaque. After the pillar is full, several cones of coldare issued from the bottom of the floor, freezing the pillar, after which the pillar of force is shut off, a blade barrier surrounds the pillar of now ice for a few seconds, then vanishes, leaving their friend carved out of the ice, but still frozen. before the characters can move, the sides of the wall smash together, breaking their friend into a thousands of tiny little pieces. little do they know that the pillar of water was transported away to a different but identicle in dimensions to the previous pillar of force where the BBEG awaits. and the opaque water is not water at all(although the liquid that is transported in its place to the origional pillar is), but a potion of hold person(no side affects from drinking only a partial amount). as the second Pillar of force is let down, the BBEG steps in and puts on a helm of opposing alignments(+dominate monster+one-way telepathy(recieving), for good measure) and sets them off against their own party.

any questions?

EDIT: for clairification purposes, both dungeon squares under the pillar of force are dugenonspaces of waterbreaithing(potionbreathing, mayhaps) so he doesn't drink the potion, but rather breathes it in(still gets into his system though, so its all good).

Originally posted by kraleck:

Interesting, BobtheMoose, but you could've used Oil of Hold Person. If anything, oils have the same effect as potions when they come in contact with a target. Which is why "Oil of Fireball" is more plausible (holy Ravenwood, I mixed logic and D&D!) than "Potion of Fireball."

On that note...

213. Oil and Water
The PCs come across a mad scientist-type lab that is completely unlabeled. The PCs will have to identify potions, oils, and magical equipment on their own power as the lab has wards against direct magical identification, but magically aided identification still works. There are several oils hanging from the ceiling out of reach. The scientist has an unusually large iron golem for a guardian that has oils strapped around its body, each arm, and lower half. After fighting the Golem and nearly destroying it, the scientist snipes the oil bottle on the Iron Golem's body from the trapdoor above using a sling and True Strike. Those oils on its body and limbs are Oils of Repair Serious Damage (Spell Compendium, works as Cure Serious Wounds for Constructs). After destroying the body, the arms and lower half disconnect and keep fighting. Yup, the limbs are constructs in their own sense. The limbs have reduced strength without the body, but are still deadly. When these get low on health, the scientist will snipe their oil bottles. After destroying the limbs, the scientist will cut the cords holding the oils from above the ceiling. These oils are Oils of Fireball.
For this fight the Golem has 3 slam attacks and the usual breath weapon. Each arm and the lower half get 1 slam (think punch, punch, kick) and the body has the breath weapon. The disconnected arms "walk" with the "fingers," slam with the "shoulder," and have half the Golem's strength score. The lower half retains its normal mode of movement and strength score when disconnected. The assembled Golem has Hit Points as a Huge Construct (the body), two Medium Constructs (the arms), and one Large Construct (the lower half). Each part of the Golem acts simultaneously on the best of 4 initiative rolls and the scientist acts sparingly and at last initiative.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

214. An Intense Case of Hayfever

This trap should be used in a woodland setting, preferably a dark forest with a lot of looney elvin druids.
The PC's find they have wandered into a grove of an evil druids grove of Blood Blossoms. The plants are identifiable as a large green bulb sitting atop a four foot high narrow, woody stalk. They kind of look like a woodland version of a naval mine. (It's a good idea to place the party's objective on the other side of or in the middle of the grove, so they have to go through it)
Eventually, the plants become so thick with them, and it is hard to avoid the plants. The moment a plant is rustled, or bumped, there is a 50% chance the bulb will explode, releasing its spores. The spores or tinny barbs that are ment to cling to an animals bodie for transfer. If the person is standing 5 feet or less from the plant, they are hit with a show spray of tiny thorn spores, up to 2d20 of them, dealing 1 point of damage each.
PC's must roll a Ref. Save of 15 to take half damage, and must roll a Fort. Save of 14 to avoid being: Blinded for 1d4 rounds, and a sneezing fit for 2d4 rounds that causes them to become dazed.
The hitch is that these plants are growing really close to each other, and when one goes off, it can start a chain reaction that will set them all off.
If a plant is withing a five foot vicinity of another that has exploded, there is a 75% chance the it will too explode.
I find this trap is best used when combat insues in the area. Maybe have a patrol of Orcs or Goblins who don't know any better to set up an ambush for the PC's in the middle of the grove.

Originally posted by kraleck:

*looks at #214 and whistles*
Fascinating trap there Ravenwood. I wonder how many times my character would succumb to that one. I'd hate to actually travel through that one in real life. I wonder if it would be possible to fill a forest entirely with those things to make a natural prison.

215. Candygram
The PCs wake up at home/the inn/the secret lair/etc. and hear a knock at their door followed by the words "Candygram for Mr. *mumble*" in a quiet but easy to hear voice. Yes folks, that is an homage to Saturday Night Live right down to the assassin in the shark outfit. The shark outfit gives the assassin a special bite attack that also grants swallow whole. The PCs will never think they are safe at their hideouts ever again after this one.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

*looks at #214 and whistles* I wonder if it would be possible to fill a forest entirely with those things to make a natural prison..
(rubbing chin while thinking out loud) Yes, a wonder indeed......

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

216. The PCs walk into a hallway, surprise surprise. A sign on the door into the hall has a cryptic message about courage or bravery on it, implying that bravery will be rewarded. There are 5 grooves running parallel to each other down the length of the hallway, which has a very high ceiling, and the far wall looks rather slimy. At the far end of the hall is a very large statue. Anyway, as soon as the PCs enter 5 giant rolling blades begin to run down the grooves in the floor, right at them. However, where they stand is not only quite safe, but important to the PCs' survival as well. Moving from where they stand will release the pressure plate they were holding down. The pressure plate is holding an important rope out of the path of the blades: an important rope which is holding the 10,000-pound statue at the end of the hall just off the floor, part of which is a balance. The ropes are cut, the statue goes down, the PCs go up and, more importantly, forward into the slimy looking wall. Slimy because it's covered in black puddings, or other oozes.

**WARNING: Terrible Pun Alert**

If the PCs stood their ground, the pressure plate would have held open a pit below the grooves that the blades would have fallen into. But they probably won't and will wind up sandwiched between two gigantic pieces of stone and black pudding. I call it a PC&J. :p

Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:

smart ambushers could use the #214 by shooting at them and hitting them to set them off when the pcs are admidst them.

Originally posted by boundlesslimits:

12.) The PC's enter a long hallway at a T-junction. There is a small step down into the hall, which appears to be about 70'-90' feet long and ten feet across. Down one end appears to be a dead in wall with a bunch of holes in it, down the other end appears to be a door. Once everyone is in the hallway, they here a grinding noise, and the floor starts to slowly move towards the dead end wall. They now notice the floor is made of rubber. The movement increases in speed until the PC's find themselves running. This is pretty much a big treadmill, and the wall with the holes in it now has spike sticking through them. Anyone who is taken into that wall will be impaled on the spikes for 5d6 damage (or however much you like.) In any case, the trick is to run as fast as you can, which could be difficult for heavily burdened or armed folk, and remember, you're only moving about 5-10
forward a turn. About ten feet in front of the door is a stone platform that
the players can jump onto for safety. For every round a PC remains on the treadmill, they have to roll a balance check of about 10 to stay on their feet. If they fail, then they lose about ten feet, and are that much more closer to the spikes.
There is a switch in the wall on the platform by the door that many will mistake to be the 'off' switch. The trick is the machine starts when all feet hit the rubber, and stop when all of them are off. Whoever hits the switch only reverses the direction of the treadmill, knocking everone still on it down and catapulting them onto the platform, perhaps breaking throught the door.
If you are the type of DM like I am, you will perhaps put some hulking bad guys on the other side of that door ready to hack & slash at the PC's who are out of breath and fatigued.
Have fun.
devil.gif
(217)
(use this to go to town fast, after some bad guys lair quest etc)
the party slowly returns to town, and then suddenly BAMN! the floor crumbles,
and some of the party members who fail a reflex safe fall in.
they enter a long hallway. (one side is closed because of the rumble)
of course they are very curious and start walking in the opposite direction.
then suddenly the roof comes crashing down (illusion)
and the characters are forced into another hallway.
when the pc's look to the left they see a spiked wall,
with some decomposing body's

the walls and ceiling comes somewhat together and the floor starts to move toward the wall.

(its all an illusion)

you are actually running inside a box, wich moves toward where ever you need the pc's to go. (and yes you can make the entire party run against a wall at full speed)
all-right.gif


of course people cant run forever so the characters with the lowest con dies first.
(which where a ranger and a rogue with me) when they pass the wall you tell them "BANG ur dead".
(dont forget the EVIL DM laughter :evillaugh )
every times someone hits the wall a image of them comes on it ...dead
well that's for the ranger and a rogue then.

the samurai suddenly has a great idea
< let the wall push him forth >
ofcourse he hits nothing because the wall is an illusion and the pc's see him die, (this time everyone gets a will safe)
but the roque who runs behind the wall gets the hits.
devil.gif


this also works in evil lair
(roque fails his will safe 3 times and runs three times out of the entire building)...really happend

Originally posted by kraleck:

Quick question, boundlesslimits. Was that an extension, a story, or an entirely new trap? If either of the first two are true then never mind. Otherwise, number it and I will re-number mine:

218. Give Up Now
The PCs come to a dead end down a winding tunnel. There is a message on the wall that reads: "Your quest ends here. Surrender now or die." The PCs will then hear thousands upon thousands of voices rushing down the tunnel. The trick is to NOT fight. Fighting these foes is useless as they are in an unlimited supply. In other words, if they fight, they WILL die. If the PCs surrender, they are teleported with all the treasures they accumulated to a strange demiplane of existance. They are given a new quest by several outsiders of various sizes, shapes, and alignments who place wagers on the PCs' successes and failures and encourage newcomers to place bets of their own.

Originally posted by boundlesslimits:

okay,

what happends after you beat an evil warlock.
in the middle of no-where.

then youre in the middle of no-where

its not always right to say BOEF!! youre back into the city
because the warlock's lair is not right around the corner of the nearest town.
it could take several hours before reaching some kind of city.

the tunnel i kind of designd in 217 is a way to get everyone back to some villige in very little time.

and its all an illusion. so there is no danger atached.
they are just running like hell for absolute nothing.


also i used the quote because it is verry simular to 12
(a player said this trap was on this forrum when i told him in what kind of trap he was in)
so it is a new trap.


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

I'm a bit confused on the numbering, I think we're on 220, but then again, I've been known to be wrong...on occaison.

220. The Claw

The PC's enter a large square room, about 50 by 50 feet and a ceiling that is not visible. The ground is just littered with dead bodies and copses in various states of decomposition. The most distinguishing feature the room presents is that one whole wall is a complete glass partition. The PC's can't see through it, only their reflections.
After a few rounds, the PC's hear a loud "Clinka-clinka!" noise, and a mechanical whirring noise. Suddenly a large metal, three pronged claw on a cable drops from the ceiling and begins attacking the PC's. Roll ranged touch attacks against the PC's as the claw attacks them. As soon as the claw hits, it engages a grapple. The claw has a +12 grapple bonus, and as soon as it nabs a PC, it jerks them into the air. It continues carrying them into the air unless they can break the pin, in which case, they take the appropriate falling damage. If the claw doesn't get anybody, they hear occasionally more clinka noises.
If they don't break the pin, they are taken high up, and then jerked horizontally to the left a ways. Then they are dropped. They fall into a chute, so they don't take a crap ton of damage, but it would be good to inflict some on them (just for fun, hee-hee)
When they hit the chute, they slide a long way down, and come to rest in a thirty foot square room. After a second or so of sitting there broken and battered, a wall suddenly opens, and a huge claw comes in and grabs the PC. The PC is brought up and suddenly finds himself staring into the scaley face of the Tarrasque. He turns around slowly, and says, "Huh, I usually never win anything at that claw machine."

rimshot.gif
Thank you, thank you...is this thing on???

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

I'm a bit confused on the numbering, I think we're on 220, but then again, I've been known to be wrong...on occaison.

220. The Claw

The PC's enter a large square room, about 50 by 50 feet and a ceiling that is not visible. The ground is just littered with dead bodies and copses in various states of decomposition. The most distinguishing feature the room presents is that one whole wall is a complete glass partition. The PC's can't see through it, only their reflections.
After a few rounds, the PC's hear a loud "Clinka-clinka!" noise, and a mechanical whirring noise. Suddenly a large metal, three pronged claw on a cable drops from the ceiling and begins attacking the PC's. Roll ranged touch attacks against the PC's as the claw attacks them. As soon as the claw hits, it engages a grapple. The claw has a +12 grapple bonus, and as soon as it nabs a PC, it jerks them into the air. It continues carrying them into the air unless they can break the pin, in which case, they take the appropriate falling damage. If the claw doesn't get anybody, they hear occasionally more clinka noises.
If they don't break the pin, they are taken high up, and then jerked horizontally to the left a ways. Then they are dropped. They fall into a chute, so they don't take a crap ton of damage, but it would be good to inflict some on them (just for fun, hee-hee)
When they hit the chute, they slide a long way down, and come to rest in a thirty foot square room. After a second or so of sitting there broken and battered, a wall suddenly opens, and a huge claw comes in and grabs the PC. The PC is brought up and suddenly finds himself staring into the scaley face of the Tarrasque. He turns around slowly, and says, "Huh, I usually never win anything at that claw machine."

rimshot.gif
Thank you, thank you...is this thing on???
:heehee That was almost as terrible as my last pun, which I am completely ashamed of. But after that I feel a little bit better. Thanks, Ravenwood.

Originally posted by kraleck:

221. Sin Stone Shenanigans
The PCs come across seven pedestals in a circular pattern. There is a crystal sitting on top of each pillar. The crystals radiate nearly overwhelming magic auras. Unfortunately these crystals are actually crystallized undiluted sin. Yep, Wrath, Lust, Sloth, Greed, Envy, Pride, and Gluttony in pure crystallized form just ripe for the picking. Their Evil auras are undetectable until someone takes them. Make sure each PC gets a sin stone that keys into their classes, exalted vow feats, and characters (Wrath for Barbarians and Vow-of-Nonviolence Players, Greed for Rogues and Vow-of-Poverty Players, Pride for noblehearted characters, Lust for the Charismatic characters and Vow-of-Celibacy Players, etc.). The PCs cannot rid themselves of the sin stones unless they give in to their sin and receive Atonement from a powerful Paladin/Cleric or Being of Deific Power. The sin stones reappear at the pedestals when they leave their victims.

222. Gate of the Feuding Dragons
The PCs come across a wide corridor with two Colossal Dragons made of stone blocking all but 30 ft of the middle of the corridor. When the PCs get between the dragons they get forced back 20 feet and are told to not interfere with their battle by two loud voices. If the PCs try to pass between again, they must make a medium-high Diplomacy check (Kobolds, Sorcerers, and Half-Dragons get a +2 cumulative bonus on this check, i.e. Half-Dragon Kobold Sorcerers get +6) to stop their feud to let them and their friends pass. Failure causes the stone dragons to use their Fire and Cold breath weapons (2 Reflex Saves for half each) and the PCs can pass on if they survive. Success causes the stone dragons to disappear and opens two concealed doors to treasure rooms.

Originally posted by saberus:

221. Sin Stone Shenanigans
The PCs come across seven pedestals in a circular pattern. There is a crystal sitting on top of each pillar. The crystals radiate nearly overwhelming magic auras. Unfortunately these crystals are actually crystallized undiluted sin. Yep, Wrath, Lust, Sloth, Greed, Envy, Pride, and Gluttony in pure crystallized form just ripe for the picking. Their Evil auras are undetectable until someone takes them. Make sure each PC gets a sin stone that keys into their classes, exalted vow feats, and characters (Wrath for Barbarians and Vow-of-Nonviolence Players, Greed for Rogues and Vow-of-Poverty Players, Pride for noblehearted characters, Lust for the Charismatic characters and Vow-of-Celibacy Players, etc.). The PCs cannot rid themselves of the sin stones unless they give in to their sin and receive Atonement from a powerful Paladin/Cleric or Being of Deific Power. The sin stones reappear at the pedestals when they leave their victims.
Would the stones give penalties/bonuses, i.e. Wrath granting rage 1/day (or add another use daily for barbarian) but at the cost of reducing Cha based skill checks by 2, increasing after so many uses (as it's power consumes them). This can play into just how powerful an atonement is needed, truly sinful characters will need a more powerful spell, while PCs that are actively trying to avoid the terrible power can be more easily forgiven.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

222. It slices, It dices...

The PC's are walking down a dim hallway that leads for a while in one direction. a bit of a ways down the hall, there is a small circular roomy thing, ( kind of like this =0=). In the middle of the floor of this hallway is a shaft of light coming from above (and apparently out of no where) on a golden great sword stuck in the ground. All who gaze upon its luster must roll a will save of 17 or they feel a sudden urge to pull the thing out of the ground. They must have it, it's their precious! The sword is not aligned in any direction, so anyone can be drawn to it.
The sword takes a strength check of of 20 to pull free from the ground, and as soon as it's free from it's earthen prison, it goes crazy. The PC is no longer in control of his actions, and the sword begins to swing until everyone and everything is dead within a 30' diamerter. Every round, the PC gets a new Will save of 17 to stop his actions and drop the sword. As soon as it's dropped, that PC can touch it normally for up to 24 hours at which time, it's effects are reset.
The PC's who aren't felled by the sword can run away, but so long as the PC fails his Will saves, the sword stays in his hand, and continues to hack and slash at all living things that surround it.

In my campaign, my friend playing level 5 paladin got ahold of this baby and killed two players (one of which, to my dismay, was my own) Once he succeeded the Will save to drop the sword, he was cast down as a paladin, and was offered an attoinment to reach paladin-hood again. this sproited into a new campaign that lasted until the PC's hit level 16.

Originally posted by kraleck:

223. It slices, It dices...
Just a nitpick. Sorry.

Would the stones give penalties/bonuses, i.e. Wrath granting rage 1/day (or add another use daily for barbarian) but at the cost of reducing Cha based skill checks by 2, increasing after so many uses (as it's power consumes them). This can play into just how powerful an atonement is needed, truly sinful characters will need a more powerful spell, while PCs that are actively trying to avoid the terrible power can be more easily forgiven.
Those decisions are up to the DM. Generally, Wrath makes the victim want to shed the blood of others regardless of guilt or innocence, strength, or weakness (you'd slaughter innocent children and fierce dragons alike without preference), Greed makes the victim want to compulsively steal and hoard everything regardless of value (even badly played Kender would be appalled at the Greed sinner), Lust...you can probably guess, and so on. This should really hamper the victims until the sin drives them to insanity, suffering, or even death...usually at the hands of a dragon (a very good way to dispatch the Greed sinner I might note).

Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

I love this thread, it's starting to ripen and age to an ancient and venerable status

224

When the party walk into this huge sphere shaped room, the door shuts and disappears behind them. The only way to open the room again is to touch a ball hovering in the middle of the sphere (with their hand or similar apendage). Reaching it however will not be easy.

There are no objects inside the sphere, it is increadibly smooth, made out of polished steel. The intire room is mounted on ball bearings and will rotate if a player walks in it. It will also turn in a random direction when an object comes within X' of the central ball. So, when the players try a ladder, or stand on each others shoulder, the whole room will turn away from under their feet. Variable with the level of the party you can add spikes to the floor, or cover it in grease.

I ran this one on my party, had to add an antimagic field to stop flying. They ended up sovereign glueing themselves to the floor, then running around to get the glued partymember above the ball, then having him use some solvent to drop, and grab the ball in doing so :D :D

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

Just a nitpick. Sorry.QUOTE]

That's right. Kraleck, I didn't number it right, cus' I'm an
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ANACHIST
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Bwa-ha-ha!!!
Just kidding, I'll try to watch my numbering in the future...I'm not really an anachist...seriously...guys???

Originally posted by kraleck:

225. Choose Your Demise
The PCs find a circular room that has several doors. The sign in the center says: "These doors lead to your deaths. Choose your demise." The PCs will be freaked out when the door they came through disappears and they will have to take one door each to escape. The doors disappear when somebody enters them. Each door is labeled with words and phrases like like "drowning," "decapitation," "strangulation," "impalement," "crushed," "boiled in oil," "buried alive," "drawn and quartered," "rapidly aged," "submerged in acid," "eaten to death slowly," "heart ripped out," and "flesh torn from your bones." There are several choices beyond these that are up to the DM and the PCs will die if they enter and they will not be able to prevent it in any way. The PCs should be given search checks to notice the labels are peeling on the corners. If the PCs remove the labels, the door has a different description underneath. These new descriptions include things like "gem vault," "coin vault," "armory," and "exit." However, some of the new descriptions are written in explosive runes. The labels can be reapplied to any door or thrown into a portal and will function as the demise on the label when the door or portal are entered.
This is also a way to reveal how the players who cannot figure out the labels want to die. Just ask them why they chose those deaths after their character has died. Just say their characters are being asked by some obscure and highly curious deity who newly acquired his/her powers. You can even use their dead characters as a plot hole filling device from this.

Originally posted by kraleck:

*
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taps thread* Hello? Is this thing on? No response to the last trap, eh? Tough croud. Maybe this will get your synapses firing...

226. Shock and Awww...
The PCs will come across a room full of cute and cuddly stuffed animals (Tiny sized objects). The PCs will have to make a Will save or be overwhelmed (but by any means not helpless) by cuteness (failure means they are flat-footed for the first round of the upcoming fight). Now the real fun begins. When the PCs look carefully at the stuffed animals they will notice a teddy bear (the only Small sized stuffed animal) that has metal claws and fangs. This bear is similar to an animated object and its claw and bite attacks deal electricity damage as if they had the Shocking Burst quality. The bear also has the ability to fly. When the PCs beat the stuffing out of the bear (which has DR 5/slashing or piercing), the other stuffed animals will grow the same claws and fangs and start to attack in waves of swarms.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

227. The room the PCs enter is rather strange in appearance. There are spikes covering wall to their left, and the wall to the right ends about 2 feet off the ground. On the far wall is a rack of bows and several quivers, and a balista bolted to the ground in the center of the floor. Beyond the low wall on the right is a 50-foot wide pit, and on the other side of that is a platform with lots of barrels bolted to the ground in front of a very large fan. It takes up the entire wall and turns on as soon as the PCs enter, generating winds starting at moderate and increasing severity by 1 step every 2 rounds. As a piece of paper by the bows tells them, some of the barrels are filled with gunpowder and the only way to shut off the fan and open the door is to blow it up. Now, unless the PCs want to take their chances with a 50-foot jump in a windstorm, they're gonna have to shoot at the barrels. Unfortunately, any shot that misses the intended barrel will veer off course due to the winds and strike a barrel filled with inhaled poison, I'm thinking burnt othur fumes, which is then blown towards them. After 6 rounds they will be forced to use the balista, which only has 3 bolts left, and after 10 rounds there's nothing they can do except get blown back by the tornado-force winds into the spikes behind them.
**Note: For extra cruelty, make the spikes behind them poisoned as well. Add Antimagic Fields as needed for pesky spellcasters.
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Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

**Note: For extra cruelty, make the spikes behind them poisoned as well. Add Antimagic Fields as needed for pesky spellcasters.
devil.gif
Nasty ! I will have to try this...
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Originally posted by kraleck:

Nasty ! I will have to try this...
devil.gif
Ditto.

228. Caught With Your Pants Down
The PCs will be travelling through a corridor past a malfunctioning blade trap (it springs late, i.e. after the last PC has barely passed it) when the PC in the back starts to feel a draft. The PC in back will activate a Tasha's Hideous Laughter spell on their friends and enemies when they see that the blade trap cut off the back of their pants and left a runic symbol (Tasha's Hideous Laughter effect on any who see the symbol). The boss they soon encounter will say something like "What a dis-***ed-er" before succumbing to T.'s H. L. This should tip off the lagging PC to the condition of their pants.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

229. The room that the PCs walk into is completely empty, save a piano in the corner. 5 tiles on the floor display a black symbol that looks something like this: #. Yes folks, that is a sharp sign in music, and 5 is the number of sharps in the key of A. The other door in the room is locked, as is the one the PCs just entered through which just slammed shut behind them. The only way to open the door on the other side is to play a chord in the key of A on the piano in the corner. Any, any incorrect note or combination of notes triggers a Shout spell, even if the right notes are played seperately. The chord mus be played at once for the door to open. For extra fun, replace the suggested chord with some obscure minor key!:D
230. This room has 6 statues in it, 2 on every wall except the far one. The far wall has 6 stone weapons in racks against it, and the statues are of dieties. Very, very obscure dieties (you can choose your own, I haven't picked up Deities and Demigods), and the weapons are their favored weapons. Each statue has a hand outstretched, and when a weapon is placed there the hand closes around it. If it's the deitiy's favored weapon, nothing happens for awhile. If it isn't, the statue's eyes glow red and everyone within 10 feet of the statue gets blasted with divine energy. Once every statue has their favored weapons in hand, they are all animated and attack.
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When destroyed, they crumble to dust leaving a small gem, each of which fit into a notch in the unlockable door on the side of the room with the weapon racks.

I'm currently designing traps specific to the 11 base classes in the PHB (though some may be combined, like sor/wiz and bbn/ftr). Here's the list so far:
227. Archery-oriented Ranger
229. Bard
230. Cleric
Next up: Druid and Rogue. I promise the Rogues' will not be a Search/Disable Device DMG-style trap.;)

Originally posted by kraleck:

231. Re-Assembly Line
The PCs should hear whirring, grinding, tearing, and clanking all throughout the dungeon. The PCs are walking through a hall with illusionary pit traps and a golden figurine on the far end. The Pits are all illusionary and the PCs will expend most of their Jump and Teleport-like spells and powers until they realize the pits are fake. When the figurine is taken, the floor collapses beneath them. The PCs will land on a conveyor belt and will be stuck to it. Metal arms will tear the PCs apart (but they are kept magically alive) and magically piece them back together with each other's parts (i.e. the Halfling gets the Dwarf's legs, the Half-Orc's arms, and the Elf's ears, the Dwarf gets the Gnome's eyes and the Half-Orc's legs, just mismatch them as much as possible). When they get off the conveyor belt, they are dumped into a pile of unfinished mismatched golems. The wizard who runs this golem factory will come by to inspect the new golems and destroy the rejects. If the PCs manage to win with their "new" parts, they get put back together right by the wizard's "minion" (he's a psychic who was forced into servitude by the wizard's mind controlling magic).

Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

232) stone walls do not a prison make...

When the party is walking in a druid grove, several steel bars spring up from the ground and capture the party. The cage is then slowly lowered through a spray of rust monster essence. This will destroy all their metal equiment (something the druids who made the trap are unbothered by)

They can escape when the rustmonste spray dissolves the bars. They can push away the cage and wait for the spray to end to descend.

This could be the entry trap for a secret grove dungeon or something. Alternatively, the players could be aware beforehand, and must either pack up all their metal items, or use only wood and stone ones.

Originally posted by oorlof:

233) Kitty door
The PCs climb a long set of stairs, which go up in a straight line for lotsalotse feet. The room they're coming from, at your option, contains something nasty but immobile. Spikes and pits are a favorite.
At the top of the stairs are two huge doors. The lock and handle are dummies, as are the big honking hinges at the side of the doors. The door is actually suspended from the ceiling by retractable bars and leans ever so slightly towards the party (exaggerated side view: ___\). When the PCs try to open the door by working the lock, the bars retract, the stairs fold down to form a smooth ramp (grease at your whim) and the door tumbles down. Difficult reflex-saves can save the party, but anyone unlucky enough to fail the save will receive damage for the door falling on them, will then slide down the chute, the door'll land on top of them for some more damage, and then the nastiness in the room does it's thing.
The door can be opened (hinging back towards the ceiling) by answering a riddle of your choice, written in an invisible arcane mark on the wall a few yards before the door. Detect Magic can reveal the riddle, but the players will have to search the entire landing, not just the door to find it.
[/sblock]

[sblock=Page 9] Originally posted by bounces:

Made this trap for someone else that was looking for one...saw this thread and thought I would repost it....

224) The Machine

Try making a puzzle trap where the first thing they have to accomplish is realize that it is actually a puzzle.

As the character enters the second room have a 50 pound pressure switch on the floor activate some strange machinery against the wall. A door on the opposite side of the room opens and out steps a warforged level 1 fighter with a long sword and shield (feats weapon focus longsword, combat expertise). Your character will most likely ready for an attack but if not have the warforged close and begin attacking without explanation. Undoubtedly your player will defend himself.

Once the warforged is destroyed give him one round to collect himself and do actions. The corpse disappears along with it's equipment. Then tell him the strange machinery clicks on again and makes more grinding noises. This time when the door opens a level 2 fighter warforged with a longs sword and shield come out along with a level one fighter warforged with a long bow and 20 arrows.

Warforged Level 2 Fighter<br />Feats: Adamantite Body, Cobat Expertise, Weapon focus longsword<br /><br />Warforged Level 1 Fighter<br />Feats: Dodge, Weapon focus longbow
This fight will be a little harder. But I'm sure your player will have no problem with it. When he wins give him another round (once again the corpses disappear) before the machinery clicks on again. This time out comes 3 warforged (1 level 3 and 2 level 1s). Keep building the encounters until he figures out it's not going to stop until he dies or he disables the machine some how. Once he gets that he might attack the machine. Tell him that a wall of force blocks his path to it. If he searches for a way to disable the wall of force have him beat a search check (set the DC to something moderately hard based on what level character he is). The wall of force goes down and now he may attack the machine (AC 15 [-1 Size +6 Natural]Hardness 10: HP:50). When the machine gets to below 25 hit points have it put out a Level 1 Warforged every round on it's initiative. When it gets below 10 HP have it put out 2 level 1 Warforged every round on it's initiative....

When he destorys the machine amoungest the wreckage he finds the key, along with a decent treasure (maybe 1 minor magic item and some gold).

NOTE: This traps challenge rating is scaleable simply by adjusting the levels of the Warforged that come out of it.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

235. (For the Druid) The PCs walk into a room with statues of animals in various places around the room, and an assortment of similar-looking plants grow in a cirlce lined with stone in the center of the room. Once all are inside, the door swings shut behind them and triggers a mass Flesh to Stone effect. Yes, all of the statues are actually real, and not too happy about being turned to stone, so needless to say they attack the PCs. However, some of the animals will during the fight stop briefly (a move action) for no apparent reason. No apparent reason until the druid tries to Wildshape and discovers that there's a powerful magic effect forbidding changing shape within the room. The animals that stop during the fight are trying to fight the magic. They're not animals; they're lycanthropes! And the plants in the center? One of them is belladonna. Now, I figure that a Flesh to Stone effect would stop all circulatory functions, meaning that the afflicted lycanthropes are still under the hour time limit to be saved, but not by much. Once the fighting stops someone can try their luck at a Knowledge (nature) check to find the belladonna and administer it as necessary to save the afflicted, which is important because they're the only ones who know the password to open the door out. So far, it sounds like this can be solved without a druid. Not for long; the afflicted only speak Druidic.
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236. (For the rogue) This room has one door in, three doors out, and a large chest (unlocked) in the center of it. The only door with means to open it is the far one, which has a riddle inscribed on it: "Examine the chest for what it holds, and what you seek is worth far less than gold." The chest, should they open it, does in fact hold gold; plenty of it. But mixed in with the coins are 30 gold keys. One of them is actually tungsten, which has a similar density to gold, covered in gold leaf. (Or another metal similar, I'm not sure if tungsten is more valuble that gold or if it's radioactive :p ) Let the Appraise checks begin! This will take a maximum of half an hour, which is plenty of time to have the party's buffs wear down. Eventually the rogue should determine which key is different and therefore which key opens the door. Of course, only the tungsten key will open it, anything else will trigger a Lightning Bolt:D . The correct key doesn't actually open the door; it opens part of the door to reveal another lock that, to the rogue's delight, needs to be picked. Once this is open, a click can be heard from each door and from the chest, which slides into the ground (hope the PCs grabbed the gold!). The rogue will probably open the door he just picked out of curiousity of what could possibly be this well-guarded, and will suddenly be staring down some diabolical trap of Ravenwood's construction. Poor rogue. If only he had gone through one of the other doors that opened. Oh well.;)

Next: Sorcerer/Wizard and possibly Paladin.

Originally posted by bounces:

...the door swings shut behind them and triggers a mass Flesh to Stone effect.
I am assuming you mean Stone to Flesh?

So far, it sounds like this can be solved without a druid. Not for long; the afflicted only speak Druidic.
Um...Maybe I'm wrong...but that doesn't really seem to make sense to me. Since Druidic is a secret language that only druids know it can be assumed that it is the natural language to no one. As such they must speak at least one other tounge. I'm sorry but I don't think this really flies, unless for somereason these aflicted choose not to speak of the exit to anyone except another brother of the forest, because of some druidic reason.

Anyways...thats my 2cp.

Originally posted by realms_of_chaos:

Here are several variations of a favorite trap of my own invention, the yum pit.

237: Yum Pit
The Yum Pit is a dome-shaped impression digging 10 feet into the ground with a 20-foot radius. In the center of this pit is a single circular hole with a 5-foot radius that goes down a further 20 feet. There are several additions that can be made to the yum pit to increase its vurility.
1. Ooze Pit: This is how the yum pit gets its name. Dim the lighting so that the party can't see the bottom of the hole and place an ooze of your choice at the bottom of the hole. Optionally, put a grate on the hole so that your players need to actively find the slime. The best part is that as most oozes have a climb speed, it can climb out and attack a foe that does not notice it.
2. Spawn Pit: This particular ooze pit uses no grate but instead uses a Fully advanced summoning ooze, enough to make any party wander what is waiting below. When prey comes by, hordes of creatures start hopping out of the pit.
3. Consumption pit: This pit is instead filled with an Arcane ooze, making the darkness below appear to suck up spells.
4. Slippery Pit: The Entire dome area of the trap is covered in a slippery substance. Anyone walking onto it must make a dc20 reflex save or trip and fall into the pit. As the slippery substance spills into the pit, the dc to climb out is raised by 10. (this is my favorite).
5. Foggy Pit: The dome and pit are both concealed by fog. Note: this works well with slippery pit.
6. Vacuum Pit: This uses the consumption pit, the slippery pit, and sucks everyone within 60 feet of the pit 5 feet closer each round (requiring balance checks for everyone on the slippery surface to not fall prone and fall in.) Notes: If your party gets by this trap without setting it off, don't have the arcane ooze chase them. From their perception, a pit was just trying to eat them. That is alot more suspenseful than revealing that it was all a multi-part trap.

238: Its Door
From behind a chained door, the party can hear heavy breathing and sees the door pound back and forth. This is an illusory effect (although the shaking is really a telekinetic effect).
1. Haha: There is nothing there but you made your party cast buff spells for no reason.
2. LoL: There is an illusion of something there that reacts accordingly to attacks, making your party spend hours fighting something that isn't there and keeps "barely missing you" each time it "attacks".
3. Door of Terror: When the door is opened, a phantasmal killer spell is waiting.
4. Door of Fright: When the chains are opened, mind fog is released from under the door, keyed perfectly with the sound of a loud grunt/snort from the other side of the door. When they open up the door, there is a Wierd spell waiting for them.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

I am assuming you mean Stone to Flesh?
That's the one.
As for the question about the Druidic language, I propose 2 answers. First, they were raised by a clan of druids and taught Druidic as their first language but were outcast for not revering nature. Otherwise, I believe there's a spell in CA that modifies memories and may be able to add or remove languages; but I'm not sure if that's within the spell description.

Now...
239. (For the Paladin) The PCs walk through a door and into a fork in the road. One direction leads to the rest of the dungeon and almost certain prosperity. The other? I'm getting ahead of myself. The fork is on a balcony looking out over a pool of lava. Hanging above it and being slowly lowered down is the BBEG. The other fork leads to some means of saving him. Here the paladin must make an important decision: whether to finally have a chance to finish off the BBEG, or whether to stay a paladin. As far as I'm concerned, watching someone die slowly is an evil act.
Here's (one of) the catch(es): The BBEG is still a BBEG. He will attack as soon as he's released. Another catch: the fork towards the BBEG's rescue is warded by (I cannot for the life of me remember the spell name, it's pretty much reverse Forbiddance where only one alignment can enter... not even sure if it's a real spell, please help me out) where only an LG alignment can enter. Along the way to the BBEG there are rooms containing mothers grieving over sick children, defenseless people chained to the floor about to be mauled by a rather large creature, etc. The point is, the paladin cant possibly save all of them and the BBEG. And the final catch: As soon as someone enters the warded area monsters come out of the woodwork (not literally, just an expression :p ) in the non-warded area.
Now the paladin has a wide variety of choices: he can turn back and help his friends, therefore killing the innocents and the BBEG, or he can save the BBEG and kill the innocents and let his friends handle the monsters themselves, or he can save the innocents and kill the BBEG and leave his friends. Decisions, decisions...
devil.gif

The solution: walk down the other hallway to prosperity. Opening the door at the end of it will literally solve everyone's problems: Remove Disease, free the innocents, and save the BBEG. Sometimes it pays to go with the lesser of two (or four ;) ) evils.

Next: Sorcerer and Wizard.

Originally posted by bounces:

239. Bee-Ware

Our hero's are investigating the disappearance of people throughout the city. The trail has brought them to the one thing that links all of the missing, an abandoned warehouse on the slummy side of town. Each victim visited this warehouse for one reason or another about a week before their disapperence.

Upon arriving their arch-nemisis closes the trap that he has been setting for them for months. The doors to the warehouse swing shut and lock (STR DC 30 to break Hardness 20 HP 200 AC 9 [Seach DC 30 to notice the doors are stone covered by wood, elves and dwarves may take search checks automatically by walking by])

As the Hero's search the room they hear a clacking up above followed by a loud buzzing sound. Suddenly they are in the midst of a swarm of insect. Knowledge Nature DC 15 says they are bees DC20 says they are not normall bees DC 25 says they are werebees.

I don't have stats for werebees worked up...but they shouldn't be to hard to make. Then just put them in a swarm for nauseating goodness and let the fighting of lycanthrope begin!

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

240. Another Adventure of Nothing But Traps (part 1)

Threshold of Terror

This is a short campaign I've been running with my latest group of victims...eh hem, I mean, PC's. They are traveling in a land torn apart by a war that has lasted for centuries between an array of different armies, there's at least a dozen different ones, because the land is sacred in one way or another to them all. Depending on what the alignment of the party is will depend on which army aproaches them. Because these forces have fought for so long, they have designated battle fields, and let the citizens reside in neutral territory. This is smart because the army's buy there goods from these towns, instead of destroying them and starving. It is in one of the neutral towns you are met by (insert army faction here) who has a proposition for you.
It is rumored that an ancient Dwarven civilization was thought to reside in one of the mountains in the holy land. Inside, the Dwarven crafters forged weapons of war that could lay to waste the opponents that stood before them. Then one day, they just disappeared without a trace (kind of a Monchu Pichu thing)
There weapons or warfare are thought to still exist, and the army this diplomat represents would pay top dollar and the favoured blessing of the gods if they were to retrieve the arms for them. They would do it themselves, but it against the rules of engagement written centuries ago when the war first started that no soldier of any of the armies present for the battle should step foot on sacred land untill it belongs to them.
He gives you a map and a marker for some horses if you need them, and prays for your imenent return.
It is about a day and a half to two days travel to the appropriate spot, and the area is quiet...almost too quiet. The PC's search for the entrance, and finally find, after many hours, a cave that was masoned once, and a rusty iron switch set into the ground outside it.
The switch is so rusted from weathering, it will not budge. The PC's enter and immediatley plunged in darkness.
The cave is steep, about 45 degrees, and seems to go on forever. There are old, rusted steel beams every 50 feet supporting the tunnel, and every fifty feet mounted on the beam is a switch like the one outside.
If a curious PC doesn't go ahead and throw the switch, you can make your PC's roll a balance check every now and then. If they fall, they start to slid down, and they get a reflex save of 10 to catch the next support beam. If they do so, there is a 50% chance they throw the switch on accident.
When the switch is thrown, the PC's hear a deep, thundering sound from below them. They suddenly feel a slight wind picking up and it grows stronger every second. Then, suddenly, the
thundering turns into a roar, and the wind goes from slightly breezy to gale force winds. The PC's are lifted and thrown back through the tunnel, back towards the entrance. There is a 50% chance of them slamming into each support beam they passed on the way down, and doing so incurrs 2d6 points worth of damage. They can roll a reflex save of 15 to catch one of the beams, and then roll a strength check of 20 for every round they hand on, but they most likely will end up flying out of the cavern.
What has happend is the PC's are entering through a ventillation shaft into the Dwarven Warrens, and the switch turns on a huge exhaust fan.
The machinery is so old, however, the mechanical parts eventually shatter and break about a minute after the switch is thrown, so the PC's can again enter, a little bit worse for wear now.

Next time on:
Another Adventure of Nothing but Traps...Statue of the Demon's Demise

Originally posted by realms_of_chaos:

#241 The Entranceway: A tiled floor rests in front of the party. When a party member first steps into the room, the tile they step on raises 10 feet upwards, revealing a column containing a ladder downwards (and at the same time blocking off this entrance to whoever stepped on the tile. At the same time, all other tiles are lowered 10 feet, revealing a pool of acid throughout the rest of the room that they can reach. The floor tile is adamantine and it 1 foot thick.

Originally posted by kraleck:

242. Fireball Slide Maze
The PCs will be chasing the BBEG through a tower. The BBEG will have a head start thanks to a Wall of Force that dissipates after 2 rounds. The PCs find that there are slopes with permanent Grease spells leading down into impenetrable darkness (which is only in the slopes). There are 5 slopes and each slope they take drops them into a 10 ft circular room, but onto a pressure plate triggered and centered Fireball spell for wrong rooms. Each time a PC drops onto the plate the Fireball is activated unless the plate already has something on top of it. There are 4 slopes from each of these new rooms and 3 lead to rooms with stronger Fireball spells. Each of these 4 rooms has 3 slopes and 2 have even stronger Fireball spells. Once again, these 3 rooms have 2 slopes and 1 leads to a Teleport Circle to the start of the maze. The non-Fireball rooms have easy monsters to fight and will only serve as a distraction to buy the BBEG time to escape. The non-Teleport room has an exit door that has the strongest Fireball trap that activates when anybody besides the BBEG passes through it. Outside, the PCs will have to fight the BBEG who specialized in Energy Substituted-Fireball spells. Good luck with that Fire Resistance magic.

Originally posted by kraleck:

243. Bloody/Marry
The PCs will find various magical rings in a pile. There are a few rings that detect as strong magic but actually aren't. These rings are engagement rings and the PCs must now marry a person corresponding to the rings that the PCs will hate being married to. The campaign for this trap should include heavy blasting magic or firearms. If the PCs refuse to marry their would-be spouses, they receive several hundred points of damage from said magic/firearms (wielded by their spouses kin) then get true resurrected by the rings each time. The trick is that the PCs can file for divorce at the local magistrate.
MAJOR NOTE: The resurrecting rings will not function outside of this wedding ceremony.

Originally posted by bounces:

What kind of idiot would wear an unidentified highly magical item?

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Most PCs I've ever played with.
banghead.gif


Originally posted by bounces:

That's SO sad...

I only put on an unidentified magic item once...and that's because it was incharacter.

It was back in 2e...turns out it was a belt of gender switching...

...playing a girl was interesting.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Actually, I can't remember if they ever put on an unidentified magic item, or if I ever gave them one because I knew what the consequences would be. But these are the PCs who scored a nice TPK jumping into 300-foot-deep illusory sand.

Originally posted by kraleck:

What kind of idiot would wear an unidentified highly magical item?
You've never met my fellow players either, I see. Hello, I'm Always-well-prepared-and-the-others-survive-longer-when-they-aren't, this is Don't-need-it and his friend, Don't-want-it.

All kidding aside...

244. 100 Bottles of Something on the Wall
The PCs will come across an alchemist's lab with flasks attached to the wall. The flasks are labeled as beneficial potions, but actually aren't. When the PCs try to pull some of the flasks off, roll d4. A 4 means the flask will come free as if it was attached with the Stick spell (Spell Compendium, holds up to so much weight or force before losing stickiness), whereas 1 through 3 means the flask breaks as if it was attached with Sovereign Glue. The flasks that break are full of Acid, Alchemist's Fire, and cold and electricity versions of Alchemist's Fire. The flasks that come free are filled with drinkable water, stagnant water, and various aligned waters (Holy, Unholy, Axiomatic, and Anarchic Water, see Spell Compendium for the last two) with coloring added (roll d6 for type of water and d8 for color (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, White, and Black)). There are 100 flasks attached to the walls and the PCs should be greedy for potions.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Taking a break from the class-based traps,
245. Yet another strange-looking room. This one has a very high ceiling, so high that the top of it can't be seen, is mostly empty except for a bed in the corner and several wooden poles, and echoes with the din of industrial fans. One such fan, blowing straight up, is part of the floor. About 50-75' up on the wall, near the floor fan, there is an opening leading into a dark hallway, with more fans blowing towards it. How might the PC's get to this opening? Might they use Fly? Nope- Darn Antimagic Fields. Might they try climbing? Maybe- But nobody likes climbing up walls embedded with caltrops. That leaves one option: hitch a ride on the bedsheets.
Please note that creativity pays off in this trap. The PCs could just grab the corners of the bedsheets and be on their way. Unfortunately, this method leaves no room for steering, hence the PCs will miss their intended target and continue to float upwards. This isn't a problem... Until the PCs hear the second fan roaring away above them. It's not covered. Two things may happen here: 1) the bedsheet will be torn to shreds and the PC will fall, possibly breaking the grate over the bottom fan
devil.gif
or 2) The PC will be sucked into the fan and deposited all over the room as soup. Alternatively, the PCs could use the poles to make overly large umbrellas or sails and have a means of steering.
So, the PCs were clever, they steered into the hall, they're safe... Wrong. I can't let them go that easily :D Thus, the walls, floors, and ceilings are covered in caltrops as well, and at random intervals blasts from fans will push the floating PCs into those poky surfaces. Let the Reflex saves and Dexterity checks begin! :evillaugh

Originally posted by kraleck:

246. Chains, Cranes, and BRAAAIIINS
The PCs will come across a chamber with several hooks hanging by chains over rings attached to the floor. There is a switch on the floor that will raise and lower the hooks. In the middle of the ceiling (300 ft up) is a hole with a ladder that is out of reach. The PCs should figure out that the hooks latch onto the rings and raise the floor towards the ceiling. However, there are chains that are attached to the bottom of the floor that open several doors higher up on the walls that release dozens of Zombies. The floor moves up at 10 ft per round. Yep, they have to keep Zombies at bay until they can reach the ladder. However, when the floor stops the PCs have 5 rounds to reach and scale the ladder before the rings pull out with chains attached to them. These chains activate a Maximized Fireball when the 5 rounds have passed.

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

247. Another Adventure of nothing but Traps (part2)

Statue of the Demon's Demise

Now that the PC's have stumbled their way into the Dwarven Warrens, They find themselves in a dank, drab room that has beena victim of erosion. Once masoned the walls and floor have turned to a gravelly slush, and you appear to be standing in a room that was once a museum or shrine of some type. At least that was what it was. Over time, weather, the elements, tomb raiders, etc, have taken their toll. Display cases that once held great treasures now lay smashed and ruined. In fact, the only thing that lies in this chamber intact is a large stone statue of a demon in it's dying moments, a sword buried deep in it's chest. The statue's face is contorted in great agony, his mouth twisted open in a silent howl.
Skeletons of age old dead grave robbers and adventurers lay at the statue's feet, and it will become apparent why here in a minute.
Upon closer inspection, the sword appears to be seperate from the statue, like a seperate peace. Upon even closer inspection, it appears to be a magical sword.
When someone tries to yonk it from the statue, they must roll a strength check of 20 or more to pull it out. This means that the odds are high that the fighter or paladin in the party will do it. (it was the paladin in my campaign)
Anyway, once the sword slides free, a puff of white dust is fired from the contorted mouth of the demon, and launched into the PC's face. This is called demon dust, a powefull hallucinigenic that causes the PC to believe he has just been transported to the depths of hell (will of 22 to negate)
When he turns around, his fellow PC's to him look like demons about to pounce, so he'll want to fight them off.
The sword is a +5 Brillian Energy Bastard Sword, and the PC's who are watching their buddy skitz out will be even more suprissed when he unleashes his holy vengence upon them.
The drug lasts for 1d4 hours, and the the entire time he is seeking to destroy the demons that the PC's have become in his mind. The others need to find a way to hide from him for the duration of the effect or subdue him without killing him.
The Sword's effects die out of the sword after it's been unsheathed from the statue for 24 hours. If it is not replaced, it will turn to dust.
I my campaign, the Paladin went off the deep end and ended up killing two of his fellow party members. When he snapped out of it, he was cast down by his deity and our next campaign was a holy crusade for his attoinment. Just suggesting, this could set the stage for a side quest or new campaign.

Next time on: Another Adventure of Nothing but Traps...Web of Wetaliation.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

248. (For the Sorceror or Wizard) The circular room the PCs walk into has several distinguishing features. First, there is a ball of some unnamed colored energy floating above a pillar in the center of the room (roll d4 to determine color upon entry: 1=green, 2=orange, 3=red, 4=purple). Second, stones on the walls are inscribed with runes glowing in a uniform color (the color upon entry is the complementary color to the color of the energy ball). Third, there is a large symbol inscribed on the far door glowing red from which demonic-looking creatures are jumping into the room. And finally, this room doesn't like magic. At all. Every arcane spell cast within this room is subject to a variety of effects, based on its school:
-Abjuration, Divination, Enchantment, Necromancy: Negated.
-Conjuration, Illusion, Transmutation: Subject to a wild magic effect.
-Evocation and Universal: Functions normally; see below.
Any evocation with an energy descriptor of fire, cold, electricity, or acid veers into the ball of energy, where its energy type may be changed (roll d4 to decide new type). The change in direction does not affect whether or not the spell hits the target. After such a spell has been cast, the color of the energy and, as a result, changes (roll to determine).
The color of the runes on the wall is very important, because it shows which spells are safe to cast (red=fire, blue=cold, yellow=electricity, green=acid). If a spell of an energy type that does not correspond to the runes is cast, they release a burst of energy (of the same type as the corresponding color) that deals 1d6 per spell level (reflex save for half). Note that this effect takes place before the energy ball changes the spell's energy type.
Now, for the monsters coming out of the symbol. They are only partially real and immune to weapon damage. They also have resistance 10 to the energy corresponding to the color of the runes. This changes as the runes change.
The only way to close the symbol gate and open the door behind it is to destroy the runes. The stones they are printed on are immune to spell effects, so the rest of the party will have to take care of them while the wizard blasts the demons. However, destroying the runes releases a blast of energy, dealing 5d6 damage of the energy corresponding to the color of the rune to everything in a 10-foot radius.

Next: The Monk...
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Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

249. (For the Monk) The PCs come to a stone door with a rather unfortunate note posted to it and a spiked gauntlet lying on the floor before it. The note reads as follows:
"Dear Adventurers,
Please don't bring any metal into the next room. It will be rusted and rendered completely useless upon entry. We are absolutely serious. If you don't believe us, throw the gauntlet we've supplied through the doorway and watch what happens. There's a switch on the other side of the next room that will allow you to avoid this effect. Thank you for your cooperation.
-The Management
P.S. The button to your left opens the door. One at a time in the next room please."
The management was actually serious. Of course with this ominous a note the rest of the party with metal equipment (i.e, everyone) will not want to go anywhere near this room. I guess that leaves the monk.
As stated in the letter, the 'one at a time' rule is strictly enforced. As soon as the monk enters, the door slides shut and can't be opened until he/she leaves. The room is empty except for the switch on the other side of it, as promised. And except for a babau demon. Note that creatures striking babaus with unarmed attacks take damage. While the monk is dealing with their problem, the PCs outside the door might notice that their hallway is suddenly very full of monsters (I use rust monsters, feel free to change this as you see fit).
Should the monk defeat the babau and throw the switch, the rest of the party will avoid the rust effect as promised. But perhaps not in the method they expected. A rather deep pit opens beneath the party, dropping them below the room. At the bottom is a tunnel leading underneath said room, and a shaft with a ladder leading back up. Hey, they avoided it...
iyala.gif
As for the monk, the switch also opens another door in the room leading to the exact same spot as the other PC's pit does.
Next: The last two, fighter and barbarian.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

nice! FOr the barb and fighter, just zerg em with black puddings and rust monsters, problem solved.

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

nice! FOr the barb and fighter, just zerg em with black puddings and rust monsters, problem solved.
While I thought this was supposed to be a CLEVER trap thread, it's a good suggestion. :p
But as it stands...
250! (For the fighter) The room the PCs walk into is rather dark, but it is still visible inside (though the ceiling is not). There's a locked (DC 40) trapdoor in the center of the room, which is sthe only way out after the door swings shut behind them. Shortly after entry the PCs will hear a grinding noise, and the ceiling will come into view. It's "slowly", by which I mean slightly slower than freefall, descending on the room, and except for two copper tiles in the center of the ceiling it's covered in spikes. Someone very strong will have to hold up the ceiling via these tiles. Who could that be...? Note that the copper plates are positioned such that anyone holding up the ceiling with them would also have to be standing on the trapdoor.
While the fighter is praying to Kord that he keeps succeeding on the Strength tests, the rogue is under some considerable pressure to get the lock open. Too bad every time he fails Heat Metal is cast on the tiles. Should he ever get the lock open, the fighter will have to move away from the tiles in order to get the trapdoor open. The trapdoor which weighs several hundred pounds. Yes, the fighter will have to pull off one more Strength check to save the party...again.
Next: The final core class-Barbarian.

Originally posted by tharivol266_dup:

just so you guys know i have started the long and tedious task of going back through all of the traps and compile the best of the list

Originally posted by realms_of_chaos:

251: Rolling Bone Ooze Trap:
Basically the same as a rolling boulder trap, but the party gets a nasty surprise at the end (see MM II)

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

Finally, the last core class trap. This one's for the Barbarian.
252. The statue in the room the PCs walk into is jet black, carved in stunning detail from a single block of obsidian. It's a carving of a warrior from an ancient race, a look of fierce anger on his face, swinging a greataxe. A decent Spot check might notice that the statue has no eyes. The greataxe is not actually part of the statue. Yes, albeit with a high Strength check, the traditional barbarian weapon can be pulled from the carving's hands. Plus it's shiny. No barbarian can resist shiny. Or any PC I've ever DMed for...
Anyway, once the axe is in the barbarian's hands, its true powers become apparent. The wielder is blinded as long as he holds the weapon and for 1d6 rounds after he releases his hold, and is forced to enter a rage (if he can). Removing the axe from the statue also has another effect: a Programmed Image of the PCs being ambushed. All the wielder, being blinded knows is that it sounds like there's a battle going on, and since he's raging he should be eager to join in. The sounds of the battle come from wherever the other PCs are standing so that should be where the barbarian hits. Granted, they still have concealment, but he'll hit them eventually.
devil.gif

That's it. A trap for every core class. Now my life has no purpose...
all%20alone.gif


Originally posted by angus_cotton:

253. (for high level party, let's say level 15) The PCs travel down a hallway in a dungeon and a proximity trigger opens a trap door in a ceiling, and the bones of a skeleton drop behind them. The skeleton assembles himself and brandishes a rusty sword in front of them. This skeleton is just a normal CR 1/4 skeleton with a normal rusty longsword. The party destroys it and goes on.

A few minutes of travel down more hallways, and the PCs encounter another trap door that drops another CR1/4 skeleton with a rusty sword. The PCs destroy this one too.

Continue having the party hit these trapdoor CR1/4 skeletons till the party has killed about 6 or so skeletons. Then comes the true trap.

After 6 skeletons, the party should be lulled into a false sense of security. After traveling down yet more halls in the dungeon, have yet another proximity trap drop another skeleton with a rusty sword. This skeleton looks exactly like the other 6 skeletons, except this one is a level 10 fighter/10 weaponmaster with a +5 rusty longsword.

A level 15 party should be able to defeat this opponent, but more than likely by the 7th encounter of lame skeletons, they will probably not be taking the encounter too seriously....least until someone takes damage...or dies.

Originally posted by kraleck:

Evil. Me likey much. Have a
beholder.gif
.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

Not a trap, but something to get em into a BBEG's trap-filled lair, I suppose. It sure made it personal for my players (or their characters, rather)

You see, they're in a little rural village, 2 outta 5 wwere born there, and another 2 have family there. The last one kinda likes the place, though it hasn't got much beyond "good people and bad cabbages". Now, the BBEG's first strike against them is this.

"as you sit on the bench, gazing out at the village and its glorious fields of cabbage, you notice from the corner of your eye that the river seems to be rising unnaturally fast. You stand up just in time to see the dams rupture. The river seems to have changed color and taken on a life of its own, rushing forward towards the village in one gigantic wave.
As it pours towards the village, you see that the very ground, plants and animals below it shrivel, melt and die as the raging torrent passes over them. Soon, it reaches the houses, tearing them apart and melting them almost instantly, along with the inhabitants.
All you can hear is the screams of women and children, abruptly cut off as the wave engulfs them.
Within seconds, the village is in ruin, the screaming has ceased,there is no one left. The houses lie in ruin, as does the very earth around you. As the great wave of death closes in on you, there is only one thought in your mind: there's nothing I can do, it's over."

They survived by the way, but only by running away in time.

By the way, any ideas as to what it was?

Fine, it's a colossal gelatinous cube, with a really huge amount of creative description.

Originally posted by bounces:

C&T...you are a mean, evil, terrible, despicable, snake of a DM.

Show
[sblock]I LIKE IT:evillaugh
clap.gif
:evillaugh[/sblock]

Sad, smilies don't hide behind spoiler...
weep.gif


Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

253 & a half, I suppose...

Another Adventure of Nothing but Traps (part 3)

Web of Wetaliation

The PC's should now be recuperating from the last trap, and have searched the other tunnels to find a way into the Dwarven Warrens. The room that holds the statue, and what's left of the tunnels appear to be lit rather well by some kind of glowing fungus that grows on the ceiling and walls. Most of the tunnels have all been caved in, except for one. In this hall way lies curtain upon curtain of spider webs. These webs are so thick it is impossible to see more than ten feet down the tunnel at one time.
Upon closer inspection, the webs do not appear to host any spiders at all, or dead insect or animal husks. The webs are, however, really sticky, and really wet. As the PC's move through the tunnel, which happens to be about 80 feet long, every ten feet they must roll a reflex save of 15. (If you have a thief in the party, they can use their escape artist skill) This check is to see how much spider web they couldn't pass through without it sticking to them. Some PC's will fail most of the time, some might only fail once, this is the round counter for the trap they are about to spring.
About 40 or 50 feet down the hallway, a small trip wire is hidden among the webs. Every PC that steps past it has a 50% chance of setting it off.
When they do, spigets that are hidden in the walls suddenly fire off a short burst of flame. The webs are soaked in a flammable liquid, hence them being wet, and turn the tunnel into an inferno. The webs themselves only burn for one round, casing 1d6 fire damage, but the layers of webs on the players burn longer. For every reflex or escape artist check they missed is how many rounds they are burned by the roasting webs, dealing 1d6 for every round they failed.

More to come, Next time on:Another Adventure of Nothing But Traps...The Rolling Room Of Rampage

Originally posted by bounces:

253 & a half, I suppose...

Another Adventure of Nothing but Traps (part 3)

Web of Wetaliation

The PC's should now be recuperating from the last trap, and have searched the other tunnels to find a way into the Dwarven Warrens. The room that holds the statue, and what's left of the tunnels appear to be lit rather well by some kind of glowing fungus that grows on the ceiling and walls. Most of the tunnels have all been caved in, except for one. In this hall way lies curtain upon curtain of spider webs. These webs are so thick it is impossible to see more than ten feet down the tunnel at one time.
Upon closer inspection, the webs do not appear to host any spiders at all, or dead insect or animal husks. The webs are, however, really sticky, and really wet. As the PC's move through the tunnel, which happens to be about 80 feet long, every ten feet they must roll a reflex save of 15. (If you have a thief in the party, they can use their escape artist skill) This check is to see how much spider web they couldn't pass through without it sticking to them. Some PC's will fail most of the time, some might only fail once, this is the round counter for the trap they are about to spring.
About 40 or 50 feet down the hallway, a small trip wire is hidden among the webs. Every PC that steps past it has a 50% chance of setting it off.
When they do, spigets that are hidden in the walls suddenly fire off a short burst of flame. The webs are soaked in a flammable liquid, hence them being wet, and turn the tunnel into an inferno. The webs themselves only burn for one round, casing 1d6 fire damage, but the layers of webs on the players burn longer. For every reflex or escape artist check they missed is how many rounds they are burned by the roasting webs, dealing 1d6 for every round they failed.

More to come, Next time on:Another Adventure of Nothing But Traps...The Rolling Room Of Rampage
Problem with this trap is I know my PCs...they wouldn't walk through spiderwebs...they would burn them out themselves...

Need to have something at the start of the hall that prevents burnination until they are actually in the webs and will be caused damage. I would say antimagic field, but just a tindertwig or a torch will set that hall off...

Any ideas?

EDIT: Numbering Correction: Angus Cotton had trap #253...E, yours should be 254.5...or really I would say we can call Cog&Taz's a trap, since the PCs could have been killed and call yours 255.

Anyways, numbering is off. Thanks!

Originally posted by E._Ravenwood:

Problem with this trap is I know my PCs...they wouldn't walk through spiderwebs...they would burn them out themselves...

Need to have something at the start of the hall that prevents burnination until they are actually in the webs and will be caused damage. I would say antimagic field, but just a tindertwig or a torch will set that hall off...
The idea that the strange fungus lighting the rooms and hallways is so that the PC's do not automatically light torches or fire. However, clever PC's who would burn off the spider webs in the first place might not if they smell an alcholic smell or oil smell, basically fumes of some accellerant that would lead them to believe that lighting any kind of fire might engulf the entire complex into flames. This might make them weary about open flames as a whole, casuing them to enter the spider webbed hall without burning them out.

Hope that helps, and thanx for correcting the numbering
smile.gif

Originally posted by harlequinhelsing:

I would suggest bursts of wind at random intervals, or a continuous breeze, that would extinguish any open flames. This coupled with an antimagic field should keep the flames down until the right moment.

Along similar lines,
256? The room the PCs enter has a large body of what would appear to be very cold water. However, the liquid is slightly thicker than water (though not enough to really notice). The only way to get to the other side of the room is to cross this pool, so the PCs will probably sense no danger and swim through it. That's fine since the liquid is perfectly safe. For now...
plotting.gif

The liquid is very cold, as is the iron door on the other side of the room. Behind the other door is a hallway with rows of barred cells containing bleakborns. See Libris Mortis page 86 and note that their touch deals cold damage, and they deal cold damage in a radius around them. The bars are close enough together that they can't be attacked through effectively, bu the bleakborns can still reach out through them and grab at the PCs.
This is when the liquid becomes dangerous. It has slightly higher freezing point than water, and freezes much harder. Creatures covered in this liquid (namely the PCs) take a -4 penalty on saves against cold, and take double damage from cold. If they take any damage from cold, the liquid freezes solid. If it's a targeted cold effect (like the bleakborn's touch) the liquid around the affected area freezes. If it's an area effect, roll for what freezes first. Specific areas affected pose a variety of penalties:
1-Leg: -10 to all movement forms, -2 on Dexterity-based checks.
2-Arm: -2 on all Strength- and Dexterity-based checks, and an additional -2 to attack and damage rolls.
3-Chest: -3 to Fortitude and Reflex saves.
4-Head: Blinded and deafened, must begin holding their breath.
Once frozen, the liquid can be broken off either with a Strength check (DC 20) or by dealing damage sufficient enough to shatter it. It has 20 hit points and hardness 8.

Originally posted by zombiegleemax:

Ok I dont know if this is any better then one of Es traps but I wanted to present it to you.

Ok your PCs enter a 30ft hallway with a 5ft long pit in the middle, three ropes hang from the last 3 tiles at the halls end, all ropes say dont pull( if your dum youll disobey) pulling the one closest to the pit puts up a ( illusion) wall on the entrey side of pit, cutting hallway in half. second makes a hole above the pit open and ( illuion again ) looks like it lead up and out, 3 activates a convererbelt dropping you into the pit.

when the pit gets enough wieght equal to your whole party it slowly moves up, PCs think its a elevator out( make it after a huge fight) as they reach the fake tunnel outs begining you tell them( you feel your body begin to compress as the partys bones shatter and guts squish) the end
smile.gif
smile.gif
:p
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Originally posted by aidanpryde:

These are great traps, but I threw 4 of them at my pc's tonite (all of them E Ravenwood's, glass houses, run like hell, he could go all the SPLAT, and Chimney sweep) and they bypassed the trick part easily on them all until I gave them the chimney sweep trap. I'd have been lost with out this thread guys, good job.

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

why thank you...

Originally posted by kraleck:

We aim to please.

258. The Idiot Box
The PCs travelling through a ballroom find a door with a sign 65 feet in front of it that reads: "Warning! This room is full of idiots. Do not open the door." When the group opens the door they get thrown back 60 feet taking falling distance equal to half the distance. Their landing activates a magic mouth that announces: "Ladies and gentlemen, presenting The Idiots." From now on, the PCs are branded with a mystical box-shaped symbol that translates as "idiot" in every language.

Originally posted by oorlof:

We aim to please.
confused.gif
I thought we aimed for the knees...anyway. On with the carn-show!

259. Walk the line
The PCs enter a round room, 110 feet across and 20 high. In the center of the room, a 10 foot wide hole (circular) filled with magical darkness can be seen. On the stone floor, an intricate maze is laid out. Three paths of glowing stone start at the door and quickly form a maze through the room. Only one line can be seen terminating at the door on the far side of the room.
Furthermore, the floor is divided into 10 feet wide concentric rings. The different paths of the maze will, when followed, all eventually lead a person across all the rings on the floor.

When PCs step from the outer ring onto an inner ring, it and all the rings further to the center drop 5 feet. Thus, when walking in a straight line to the center, the floor becomes an amphitheater, with the outer ring at the old ground level, the next ring 5 feet below the outer one, the next ring 5 feet below that, etc etc. Once the ring next to the central hole drops down, a gelatinous cube (cilinder, actually) trapped in the central hole slithers out... During combat, require climbing/jumping checks to safely scramble up the smooth 5 foot steps of the arena.

Basic solution
Stick to the outer ring. The maze is there as a distraction and there's no need to proceed to the inner ring and kill the gelatinous cube. The door on the other side can be opened with a difficult but manageable open lock-check.

Variations on the exit-condition

Require a piece of slain gelatinous cube to be inserted into a slot OR require the cube's acid to disolve something barring the exit OR once the cube has escaped, require a large weight (i.e., the cube) to be put on a pressure plate in the central hole before the exit will open.

Variations on the puzzle
Reduce the 3 paths of the maze to one and require the PCs to remain on that path. The steps to the central hole will still drop and the cube will still slither out, but anyone stepping off the path gets zapped with fire/electricity appropriate to their level. Require balance-checks to stay on the path when damaged or moving quickly.

Variations on danger level
Have the path start to slowly disolve after the first PC steps on it, imposing a time limit before it's totally gone. OR replace the cube with a more dangerous ooze.

edit: tried to ascii a side view of the floor before and after moving around a bit...didn't work as intended. Hope it's clear from the text how this works...

Originally posted by cog_and_taz:

confused.gif
I thought we aimed for the knees...
no, that's only for gnomes.

Originally posted by alcari_ambaron:

Originally Posted by Oorlof
I thought we aimed for the knees...
no, that's only for gnomes.
Exactly, use humans go for the face, which bring me to this trap:

260 (i think) "not in the face"

In a Gnomish barrow, A sign tells the party to face the wall, and not move. Naturally they're reaction will be "Screw this" and walk on. The floor will then be electrified for 3d6 damage/round. The only safe space is on a small strip near the wall.

When the whole party (or party-1) is on this strip, have a magic mouth say something along the lines of "Long legs are not permitted." When several spikes of Force shoot out the wall, impaling anything above 5ft.
The Gnomes who build this had not a problem, it would miss them anyway.
[/sblock]
 

kilroy214

First Post
Oh my god. I used to post on that thread all the time back in the day. It really warms my heart to see that it is still getting passed around. I never thought I'd see that thread again once WOTC overhauled their site.
Feeling nostalgic here...don't judge me.

What's really bad is that zombiegleemax is not an actual member, it is a title bestowed on accounts that were erased after about 5 years of unuse, so every post by that name is a long forgotten member.
 
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Thymm

Villager
I remember that thread, from some time ago! Some nice ideas in there. I started at least four times to bring them all into one document and in a easily readable format, but always stopped halfway through, because of my lazyness...
 

RealAlHazred

Frumious Flumph (Your Grace/Your Eminence)
What's really bad is that zombiegleemax is not an actual member, it is a title bestowed on accounts that were erased after about 5 years of unuse, so every post by that name is a long forgotten member.
I think it might have just been accounts that errored when they automated the transfer, as I remember feeling jarred when I saw some of my own posts with "zombiegleemax" on 'em. A real WTF moment!
 



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