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General Yoon Suin - the best D&D setting I ever purchased in 30 years, on sale for 1 pound

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Hello

I would not do this for most sales (I have no financial/affiliation with this product), but this is the best D&D setting I've purchased in 30 years of gaming. The author is going to publish a 2nd edition soon-ish, so he's put the original (digital) on sale for 1 pound (!).

This setting is vaguely inspired by Tibet, Nepal and India (no aim at historical accuracy here) and is wildly original. Even if this area doesn't interest you, there are so many good things you can steal from the setting that it's completely worth buying this. There is a chapter on how to build a campaign that is particularly relevant. It's "meant" to be used with old school D&D (B/x) but can easily be converted, I ran a 2 year 5e campaign in this world.

 

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Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
My review of the setting - I wrote it for EN world but I can't find it.

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I really love the review, but sadly I'm not that into OSR and really need a little bit more professional editing/artwork to fall in love and want to run a campaign here myself. Still, amazing creativity and filled with inspiration throughout. If I was making a new setting or adventure in an Asian-inspired world, I'd hire the writer on the spot; his work is stuffed with originality with respectful cultural influences.

Looking at another work of his, Behind Gently Smiling Jaws.... a world entirely based in the "mind palace" of an ancient crocodile. That is so left-field I'm totally impressed, and at least makes me want to try a one-shot of PCs running through the ruins of a civilization built in the memories of an ancient creature... super trippy stuff.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
I really love the review, but sadly I'm not that into OSR and really need a little bit more professional editing/artwork to fall in love and want to run a campaign here myself. Still, amazing creativity and filled with inspiration throughout. If I was making a new setting or adventure in an Asian-inspired world, I'd hire the writer on the spot; his work is stuffed with originality with respectful cultural influences.

Looking at another work of his, Behind Gently Smiling Jaws.... a world entirely based in the "mind palace" of an ancient crocodile. That is so left-field I'm totally impressed, and at least makes me want to try a one-shot of PCs running through the ruins of a civilization built in the memories of an ancient creature... super trippy stuff.
I'll note that you don't "have" to play OSR with this. I ran a 2 year 5e campaign in there just fine :)
 


Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Thanks for the hint! (I will probably buy this tomorrow)

Do you have any link or details about the upcoming second edition?
Here you go :) For one pound, you have little to lose and much to gain :)

 


Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
I found the setting pretty interesting in that PBP game you ran (and I remember its influence on your characters in my PBP games that you played!)
And now it can be yours for a very modest sum :)

I should elaborate on why I'm pushing this - I just think it's that good. A lot of people don't know about it, and it's a shame.
 


Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
One of the really neat things about this is that it's not a setting where everything is set in stone - it's a setting that you build yourself. The tools given to you could be use for an entirely different setting if you wanted, so it's very good to learn campaign-building.

First, pick a region in which you wish to begin your campaign. Turn to the relevant chapter, and the relevant map (p. 307-315).

Second, begin using the tables to generate the set-up for the campaign. Each chapter is, broadly, arranged as follows, though there are some variations:

I. Initial tables to generate details about the location where the campaign begins [not all chapters contain such tables].
II. The PCs’ social circle. Tables for generating a number of social groups who the PCs have ties to, followed by tables to generate local ‘personages’ who the PCs have contact with – or for when a player asks, “Does my PC know anyone
who….?” Use these tables to create an initial social web for the campaign.
III. General rumours and hooks. Use these tables for generating miscellaneous rumours of work and/or adventure.
IV. Random encounter details, and other useful tables.
V. Surrounding geography. A series of tables to create locales – small communities and monster lairs – with which to
populate the relevant hex-map. Each chapter also has around 20 sample hex locations to add to the map as desired.
VI. Each chapter may also contain other bespoke tables for specific types of adventure (for instance, the Yellow City and Topaz Isles chapter has a number of tables to be used to run adventures in the Old Town).

Third, since you now have enough information and detail to flesh out the initial set-up for a campaign, and a good deal more, begin doing so! An example of how to do this can be found on the new few pages.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Looks interesting, I decided to go ahead and buy it. I like the marginalia with cross references. Wish WOTC would do more of that.
 

J-H

Explorer
I went ahead and picked it up. I'm enjoying reading through the intro, as I personally struggle making evocative descriptive text.
 


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