Q&A with Gary Gygax - Page 234
  1. #2331
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    Quote Originally Posted by Col_Pladoh
    Surely you have no problems with 2E, as it was your fisrt FRPG It did lose about half the AD&D audience for TSR, though, and that's a fact.
    that it did, true. i have to confess though, i never really understood why people had such a problem with it. maybe that's because i was not part of the transition? the rules didn't seem to change in any great capacity, mostly cosmetic changes it seems to me - it certainly wasn't the day and night difference between AD&D and 3E D&D. maybe the animosity of people was because you had no personal involvement in the change (and didn't want to), or maybe it was the people who spearheaded the change and/or the dubious activities that caused you to not be with the company anymore... i just really don't see that big of a difference between the two editions of AD&D. forgive my ignorance.

  2. #2332
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    Hi Gary, I've got a couple more for you. This time moving forward a bit, from 1974 all the way to 1977 :

    I was looking through the J. Eric Holmes-edited D&D Basic rulebook last night (still my favorite of the various 'introductory' D&D sets) and got to wondering about a couple things:

    While most of the rules in that book come straight from OD&D, there are several spots that anticipate AD&D (some spells, full treasure types table from the MM, etc. -- not to mention that the book consistently refers readers to AD&D, rather than OD&D, for further info) as well as a few rules that don't seem to match either edition (10 second instead of 1 minute combat rounds, initiative determined by Dex score with a die-roll used only to break ties, use of the magic-users' "% to know spells" table, etc.). Were these (the latter case) rulings decisions made by Dr. Holmes on his own (interpreting the sometimes ambiguous wordings in OD&D) or did they reflect actual thought and practices at TSR at the time (ideas that were subsequently rejected by the time AD&D saw print)?

    And also I wonder why, since the book bills itself as an introduction to AD&D, once the full extent of the rule changes between OD&D and AD&D (such as starting the AC table at 10 instead of 9, upping fighters' clerics' and thieves' hit dice, granting spells to clerics starting at 1st level, etc.) were known that the Basic rulebook wasn't updated/revised to incorporate more of those changes and remain consistent (especially since the book was revised after the publication of the AD&D Monster Manual -- adding several creature listings (such as giant rats and troglodytes) that were present in the MM but not in the OD&D rules)? Was it simply not considered worth the effort, or had it already been decided by that point (1978-79) to keep "Basic D&D" closer to OD&D than to AD&D (i.e. the same thought process that eventually led to the 1981 revision of the Basic Set and introduction of the Expert Set as a replacement of sorts for the OD&D white-box)?

    Regards,

  3. #2333
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    Another one I just thought of as I was typing the last question(s):

    Back in 1988 I played with you at a convention game (Glathricon in Evansville, Indiana), exploring the Tomb of Rahotep under AD&D rules. One of the 'house rules' you used in that game (as well as the 'BUC' system for currency/treasure) was to give the characters 'joss factors,' as later seen in Dangerous Journeys. Were you simply playtesting ideas for your new system-in-progress, was this a special one-time-only consideration because of the difficulty of the particular module (which was plenty difficult, though I did manage to survive intact -- barely ), or was this an idea you thought appropriate for addition to AD&D games in general? And if so, do you still think it's a good idea?

    Just something that's been floating around the back of my mind for the past, oh, 17 or so years...

  4. #2334
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOZ
    that it did, true. i have to confess though, i never really understood why people had such a problem with it. maybe that's because i was not part of the transition? the rules didn't seem to change in any great capacity, mostly cosmetic changes it seems to me - it certainly wasn't the day and night difference between AD&D and 3E D&D. maybe the animosity of people was because you had no personal involvement in the change (and didn't want to), or maybe it was the people who spearheaded the change and/or the dubious activities that caused you to not be with the company anymore... i just really don't see that big of a difference between the two editions of AD&D. forgive my ignorance.
    Your guess is as good as mine, but the old saw about if it ain't broken don't fix it likely applies.

    Cheerio,
    Gary
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  5. #2335
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Foster
    Hi Gary, I've got a couple more for you. This time moving forward a bit, from 1974 all the way to 1977 :

    I was looking through the J. Eric Holmes-edited D&D Basic rulebook last night (still my favorite of the various 'introductory' D&D sets) and got to wondering about a couple things:

    While most of the rules in that book come straight from OD&D, there are several spots that anticipate AD&D (some spells, full treasure types table from the MM, etc. -- not to mention that the book consistently refers readers to AD&D, rather than OD&D, for further info) as well as a few rules that don't seem to match either edition (10 second instead of 1 minute combat rounds, initiative determined by Dex score with a die-roll used only to break ties, use of the magic-users' "% to know spells" table, etc.). Were these (the latter case) rulings decisions made by Dr. Holmes on his own (interpreting the sometimes ambiguous wordings in OD&D) or did they reflect actual thought and practices at TSR at the time (ideas that were subsequently rejected by the time AD&D saw print)?
    Thoughts and practices at TSR? Heh! As it happened, I reviewed Eric/s ms. and put in the material I was creating for the new AD&D system, thus making a transition from D&D to AD&D easier for those who wished to do so.

    In short, I was 99% of the creative force in regards to the D&D/AD&D game until I put Frank Mentzer in charge of the D&D line.

    And also I wonder why, since the book bills itself as an introduction to AD&D, once the full extent of the rule changes between OD&D and AD&D (such as starting the AC table at 10 instead of 9, upping fighters' clerics' and thieves' hit dice, granting spells to clerics starting at 1st level, etc.) were known that the Basic rulebook wasn't updated/revised to incorporate more of those changes and remain consistent (especially since the book was revised after the publication of the AD&D Monster Manual -- adding several creature listings (such as giant rats and troglodytes) that were present in the MM but not in the OD&D rules)? Was it simply not considered worth the effort, or had it already been decided by that point (1978-79) to keep "Basic D&D" closer to OD&D than to AD&D (i.e. the same thought process that eventually led to the 1981 revision of the Basic Set and introduction of the Expert Set as a replacement of sorts for the OD&D white-box)?

    Regards,
    The Basic Set was not meant to be AD&D, or an introduction to it despite what someone at TSR put into the work. There was never any intention of melding the two games. that should be obvious from the continuation of the D&D game product line, its direction being different from AD&D's.

    Cheers,
    Gary
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  6. #2336
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Foster
    Another one I just thought of as I was typing the last question(s):

    Back in 1988 I played with you at a convention game (Glathricon in Evansville, Indiana), exploring the Tomb of Rahotep under AD&D rules. One of the 'house rules' you used in that game (as well as the 'BUC' system for currency/treasure) was to give the characters 'joss factors,' as later seen in Dangerous Journeys. Were you simply playtesting ideas for your new system-in-progress, was this a special one-time-only consideration because of the difficulty of the particular module (which was plenty difficult, though I did manage to survive intact -- barely ), or was this an idea you thought appropriate for addition to AD&D games in general? And if so, do you still think it's a good idea?

    Just something that's been floating around the back of my mind for the past, oh, 17 or so years...
    Easy

    As is pretty usual for me I was outting into play-test my ideas for the upcoming Mythus game. I thought joss Factors were very necessary for the ToR scenario, of course

    That's the long and short of it.

    Cheerio,
    Gary
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  7. #2337
    Mr Gygax-

    I've been reading these threads for so long, and so often started a post only to stop and say "Nah," that I cannot now remember if I've actually ever posted this, or merely typed it several times. Forgive me.

    My name's Matthew Colville and I grew up playing your game. On behalf of myself and my dozen or so friends, all of whom have been playing together for the last 20 years I thank you, and those who contributed to the inspiration, for your work.

    I was very lucky in my life, and have been able to earn a good living and have a satisfying career as a game designer. Had there been no D&D in my life, I would not be recognizable as the person I am today. And I'm very, very happy.

    After working for Last Unicorn Games and Wizards of the Coast and Decipher, I am now a designer and story editor for Pandemic Studios. We make video games. When I got my first job in the industry, working on the Dune CCG, I thanked my gaming group. Without their support and friendship, the notion of being a game designer would never have occured to me. I thanked them again when I arrived at Pandemic. I am happy to report that, contrary to what my prior experiences would indicate, there are game companies out there who make a lot of money, make great games, and treat their employees with care and attention.

    I thanked my friends, and I must also thank you. Playing D&D in 1986 set me on a path that led directly to where I am now. You and others created a genre of game that captured our imagintion, led us on endless adventures, and left us with dozens of warstories we'll be telling the rest of our lives.

    Further, though my formal education includes writing and composition and dramatic forms, my experiences as a game master and a player continually inform my work both as a designer and as a story editor.

    I probably have a million questions for you, but obviously that's not the reason for my post. Thank you for the work you've done. Keep it up. I'll run the new Castle Zagyg as soon as I get my hands on it.

  8. #2338
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    Thanks Matthew!

    Those very kind words are much appreciated, and they and like testimonials are the best part of sharing my creative work. As i must always point out, however, at best what I did assisted you in realizing your potential even as it brought fun and friendship to you and your comrads.

    So all I can add is that I am most hapy to have been of service, and i surely enjoyed the "work"

    Cheers,
    Gary
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  9. #2339

    FeuMeuFeu

    Quote Originally Posted by Col_Pladoh
    Getting Francois to do anything other than his graphic novels is a most challenging task, you see.
    Les Chroniques de la Lune Noire ?

    Hello, Gary !!!

    I've discovered D&D (and RPGs) with the Red Box. I've played AD&D1 and AD&D2...and now i'm playing 3.x and enjoy it...Even if D&D is my favorite RPG, i'm playing other RPG like Castle Falkenstein, Dying Earth, Warhammer (IMO the Enemy Within campaign is the best adventure ever published in the RPG industry), Hawkmoon, Star Wars, Star Trek etc...

    The Questions now...

    1. You have played with François Marcela Froideval, right ? Is it true that L'Empire de Lynn is located on Oerth ?
    2. Have you ever played other RPG than D&D, C&C or LA ? Which ones ?
    3. In D&D there is Dragons and...Dungeons...why have you choose to set mostly of the adventures underground ? This is not very flamboyant and grandiose for great adventurers to crawl in the filth of tunnels and catacombs . There is a hidden meaning for this ?
    4. What is your favorite color ?
    5. What is your quest ?...

    Thanks for all...

  10. #2340
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vlad Le Démon
    Les Chroniques de la Lune Noire ?
    None other Francois is working on the next book now.


    ...

    1. You have played with François Marcela Froideval, right ? Is it true that L'Empire de Lynn is located on Oerth ?
    Yes, and yes. His area of Oerth was located to the west, and it included the island of Mephreton.

    2. Have you ever played other RPG than D&D, C&C or LA ? Which ones ?
    Empier of the Petal Throne, Metamorphosis Alpha, Top Secret, GW, CoC, Paranoia, Dangerous Journeys (Unhallowed [horror] and Mythus [fantasy], and a few others, including some I was testing for paper or computer game publication.

    3. In D&D there is Dragons and...Dungeons...why have you choose to set mostly of the adventures underground ? This is not very flamboyant and grandiose for great adventurers to crawl in the filth of tunnels and catacombs . There is a hidden meaning for this ?
    Heh, as if dungeon crawling wasn't the most popular sort of adventure! Note that mant action films and most computer RPGs use such settings, whether actual dungeon-like places, caves, or industrial-type enclosed environemnts. think of the motion pictire Alien.

    The meaning is simple, to bring fun and excitement to the players involved. What better than the lurid tension of a subterranean maze?

    4. What is your favorite color ?
    The rainbow and all its permutations.

    5. What is your quest ?...

    Thanks for all...[/QUOTE]

    I am consumed by no driving force. I enjoy each day for what it brings.

    Cheerio,
    Gary
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