log in or register to remove this ad

 

5E 3 Classic Settings Coming To 5E?

On the D&D Celebration – Sunday, Inside the D&D Studio with Liz Schuh and Ray Winninger, Winninger said that WotC will be shifting to a greater emphasis on settings in the coming years.

This includes three classic settings getting active attention, including some that fans have been actively asking for. He was cagey about which ones, though.

The video below is an 11-hour video, but the information comes in the last hour for those who want to scrub through.



Additionally, Liz Schuh said there would be more anthologies, as well as more products to enhance game play that are not books.

Winninger mentioned more products aimed at the mainstream player who can't spend immense amount of time absorbing 3 tomes.

Ray and Liz confirmed there will be more Magic: The Gathering collaborations.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

I said it already in another thread, and I wasn't joking: gnomes should be a subspecies of halflings. Naturey gnomes are already basically halflings with a bit of magic, and tinker gnomes can be just halflings from a technologically focused culture.
I remaining disagreeing on that, gnomes have their own niche that's completely different from the halfling niche. Sink halflings into gnomes would be the smarter decision and also not have resulted in a certain lawsuit a few decades ago

Also we saw what happened the last time they left gnomes out. Folks were not happy

If we're removing things, half-elves and half-orcs should have a Pathfinder 2-esque trait you can apply to things rather than being fully fledged races
 



ChaosOS

Legend
Supporter
While I know there was serious backlash to 4e's PHB2 delaying things like half orcs, gnomes, and druids, I actually really like the extra thought they put into some historically troubled races. Fey gnomes were a really good addition to core, and even in Eberron where I feel gnomes had the best definition it added some color. "Lolrandom" gnomes aren't great, and tinker gnomes usually suffer from the issue that their inventions don't get to impact the rest of the setting.
 

Remathilis

Legend
Not to put too fine of a point on it, but the lore building of 4e was HIGHLY UNDERRATED. 4e sought to make the D&D universe into a coherent one. It even put a tremendous amount of thought into systematizing the undead and their origins.
The two biggest problems with 4e's lore was a.) It was spread out all over the place and there was no easy starting point to act as a good primer for it, and b.) It had the unfortunate task of replacing 30 years of beloved garbled mess. If they had done a good "Nentir Vale gazetteer" for PCs and DMs to use as ground zero (rather than spreadv nuggets of it through the rulebooks, Dragon mags and modules so that you need a decent wiki to keep track of it) and kept it to Nentir Vale at first and then work parts of it into other settings rather than crash the systems with major changes it might have gone better.
 

Quickleaf

Legend
Honestly I assume that if anyone would publish Planescape again, they'd ignore Faction War.
Another thing that you're going to have to address is the fact that TSR nuked most of the settings before they went way in an attempt to try to change up the world to boost sales. This was generally regarded as a terrible idea as it took away what made so many of the settings popular.

Planescape was known as the multiplanar Freakshow partially because of the art. But it was also well-regarded because it had all of the inter factional internecine sniping that caused most of the conflict in Sigil. Then the lady of pain kicks them all out of the city and suddenly the major source of conflict is gone.

Mystara did this with its cold war vibe as the two largest empires could squash everybody else lile bugs but were too evenly matched to defeat each other without destroying themselves. Then Wrath hits and Alphatia's gone and Thyatis is a shell of itself. No more cold war and again the major source of conflict is removed.

If you're going to bring the settings back you have to bring them back when they were at their most popular because that's what people wanted. We remember them at their peak. Planescape without factions and mystara without a cold war are boring. The same holds true for the other ones as well
I really really hope so. I loved the hell out of Planescape and Faction War really bugged me. Given 5e's propensity for ignoring past canon when they want to, I certainly hope that if they do bring us back to PS that they just kinda leave that bit behind.
Or the Lady of Pain might just let them back in to Sigil again, but with restrictions that make factional fighting much more behind-the-scenes. That opens things back for factional conflict, but with more nuance and intrigue.
On the Faction War possibly working, the thing is the narrative space for factions but outside of Sigil was already occupied by the Sects (several of which WERE factions that got exiled on the last time the Lady did a purge)

Back in 2012, RPG Codex interviewed Monte Cook (who wrote for the Planescape line), and he shared some insights into the plan to resolve Faction War and return the factions – but then the product line came to its end. Codex Interview - RPG Codex Interview: Monte Cook on Dungeons & Dragons and RPG Design

Faction War was never meant to be the end of PS. There was supposed to be a follow-up adventure/sourcebook that rebuilt things. But the line was cancelled before it could come out. A real shame. In later years, however, I was able to produce a sort of Planescape reunion product for Malhavoc Press called Beyond Countless Doorways. I brought together Zeb Cook, Michele Carter, Colin McComb, Ray Vallese, and Wolfgang Baur, some of the core minds that PS came from, and we put together a d20 sourcebook about planar travel that I'm really proud of.
 


Nymrod

Explorer
Back in 2012, RPG Codex interviewed Monte Cook (who wrote for the Planescape line), and he shared some insights into the plan to resolve Faction War and return the factions – but then the product line came to its end. Codex Interview - RPG Codex Interview: Monte Cook on Dungeons & Dragons and RPG Design

And that would have been solid for Planescape (and perhaps needed for some factions, especially the Mercykillers whose philosophy attracted people on extremely different ends of the spectrum). But the truth is that so many settings got nuked during editions transitions (in FR with the "Realm-shaking events" occuring annually was pretty much a joke at some point).

Honestly for me the best thing would be for all settings to work a bit like Eberron. Find a great point in time, take the setting there for canon, let a few things be mysteries and do not officially move it forward, letting novels and adventures be POSSIBILITIES. If possible include ways to play the game at several points in time (As e.g. Dragonlance did in 3E). It gives everyone, including the writers, the most freedom. If someone wants continuity for their fiction, well this is fantasy and we have many an example of multi-novel stories in the same setting. As for GMs, them and their players can decide ahead of time when they want to play in a setting and what they want to have there. If in my FR the kings of Impiltur and Cormyr marry, then that's how it is in my FR after all.

The issue of course would be if there is any consensus on what the best time (and place) for a setting is. Some settings imo had fairly reasonably timelines were catastrophes did not happen just to fit an edition-ending campaign. I could see keeping Greyhawk as it is for instance. But beyond Planescape with its Faction War, what about e.g. Ravenloft and the Grand Conjunction?
 
Last edited:

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Are people seriously debating on gnomes vs. halflings again... I really don't think the average player cares that much about this.

I mean, Critical Role, arguably the most popular piece of D&D content this decade, originally had two gnomes in its first campaign. I get people find D&D gnomes and halflings too similar to each other, but hell, half-elves and humans are pretty dang similar to each other and no one complains.

So let's focus up on the campaign stuff again?
 

Nymrod

Explorer
Are people seriously debating on gnomes vs. halflings again... I really don't think the average player cares that much about this.

I mean, Critical Role, arguably the most popular piece of D&D content this decade, originally had two gnomes in its first campaign. I get people find D&D gnomes and halflings too similar to each other, but hell, half-elves and humans are pretty dang similar to each other and no one complains.

So let's focus up on the campaign stuff again?
I think it was a tangent on whether campaign settings that significantly restrict options may be less valid options for 5E.
I am not sure that limitations on race are as important once Tasha's will be out. If there will be a new edition at some point, I fully expect the term to die off and honestly there is nothing stopping them from killing it now as Pathfinder 2 and others have done (after all it is such a misnomer).
I think limitations on class are probably far more important on how much they limit playstyle. Dark Sun significantly shuffles how things work for instance. 4E imo did a marvelous job with handling the rules for Athas, Shaman are a much better fit than elemental clerics considering it was always elemental spirits rather than elemental gods; defiling and weapons breaking used simple and elegant rules, themes helped significantly in defining local archetypes (probably the best fusion of crunch and fluff in all of 4E) and personally I'd rather new settings focus on reskinning existing classes/subclasses instead of trying to fit square pegs in round holes by creating a large number of new subclasses just so you can be a bard without magic . . .
 




Tyler Do'Urden

Soap Maker
One thing to remember when it comes to classic settings - they've been mentioned in the core books and beyond, and to some extent I think this can give us an idea of where they plan to go and where they don't.

For this reason, I can tell you one thing I know for certain: Birthright isn't on the list. It's not mentioned in the PHB or DMG, nor am I aware of any other published 5E books that make mention of it. Also, WotC largely decided two decades ago that they weren't really interested in supporting domain-level play, and I've seen nothing to indicate that has changed. I like Birthright; I like domain-level play; but there's not going to be official support for these any time soon.

This is also why I doubt it will be Spelljammer - I can't recall that setting being mentioned either.

OTOH, this is why I consider Mystara a possible dark horse - Mystara is mentioned a surprising number of times in official books - almost as often as Greyhawk, and more often than Dark Sun or Planescape. (Though not as often as FR, Eberron... or Dragonlance.)
 


Bitbrain

Black Lives Matter
One thing to remember when it comes to classic settings - they've been mentioned in the core books and beyond, and to some extent I think this can give us an idea of where they plan to go and where they don't.

For this reason, I can tell you one thing I know for certain: Birthright isn't on the list. It's not mentioned in the PHB or DMG, nor am I aware of any other published 5E books that make mention of it.

Birthright is mentioned on page 68 of the DMG, alongside the Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Dragonlance, Dark Sun, Eberron, and Mystara.

On Aebrynis (the heroic-fantasy world of the Birthright setting), scions born from divine bloodlines carve up the continent of Cerilia. Monarchs, prelates, guildmasters, and great wizards balance the demands of rulership against the threat of horrible abominations born from the blood of an evil god.
 

Nymrod

Explorer
Birthright is mentioned on page 68 of the DMG, alongside the Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Dragonlance, Dark Sun, Eberron, and Mystara.

On Aebrynis (the heroic-fantasy world of the Birthright setting), scions born from divine bloodlines carve up the continent of Cerilia. Monarchs, prelates, guildmasters, and great wizards balance the demands of rulership against the threat of horrible abominations born from the blood of an evil god.
And 3.5 did have Power of Faerun which was pretty much expanded leadership rules so you can have your own domains. The concept is not entirely abandoned. I could see it be one of the many planned video games for 5E as well; hate me for this but I could easily see Birthright domain management tend into a mobile phone game.
 

nevin

Explorer
Birthright is mentioned on page 68 of the DMG, alongside the Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Dragonlance, Dark Sun, Eberron, and Mystara.

On Aebrynis (the heroic-fantasy world of the Birthright setting), scions born from divine bloodlines carve up the continent of Cerilia. Monarchs, prelates, guildmasters, and great wizards balance the demands of rulership against the threat of horrible abominations born from the blood of an evil god.
I only played it a few times but Birthright could be a fun. I liked the concept but Forgotten Realms was what all my friends wanted to play
 


Presents for Goblins

Advertisement1

Presents for Goblins

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top