Planescape 5 New D&D Books Coming in 2023 -- Including Planescape!

At today's Wizards Presents event, hosts Jimmy Wong, Ginny Di, and Sydnee Goodman announced the 2023 line-up of D&D books, which featured something old, something new, and an expansion of a fan favorite.

DnD 2023 Release Schedule.png


The first of the five books, Keys from the Golden Vault, will arrive in winter 2023. At Tuesday's press preview, Chris Perkins, Game Design Architect for D&D, described it as “Ocean’s Eleven meets D&D” and an anthology of short adventures revolving around heists, which can be dropped into existing campaigns.

In Spring 2023, giants get a sourcebook just like their traditional rivals, the dragons, did in Fizban's Treasury of Dragons. Bigby Presents: Glory of the Giants will be a deep dive into hill, frost, fire, cloud, and storm giants, plus much more.

Summer 2023 will have two releases. The Book of Many Things is a collection of creatures, locations, and other player-facing goodies related to that most famous D&D magic item, the Deck of Many Things. Then “Phandelver Campaign” will expand the popular Lost Mine of Phandelver from the D&D Starter Set into a full campaign tinged with cosmic horror.

And then last, but certainly not least, in Fall 2023, WotC revives another classic D&D setting – Planescape. Just like Spelljammer: Adventures in Space, Planescape will be presented as a three-book set containing a setting guide, bestiary, and adventure campaign in a slipcase. Despite the Spelljammer comparison they did not confirm whether it would also contain a DM screen.

More information on these five titles will be released when we get closer to them in date.
 
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Beth Rimmels

Beth Rimmels


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Levistus's_Leviathan

5e Freelancer
Hard to say its not a new edition when you relegate the 2014 books to old content only accessible if you already own it, but I'm sure they'll find some way to spin it.
They take older versions of the previous core rulebooks out of print when an errata of them happens. And they update the text on D&D Beyond to get rid of the old version. That doesn't make it so errata is a new edition.
 

Micah Sweet

Legend
They take older versions of the previous core rulebooks out of print when an errata of them happens. And they update the text on D&D Beyond to get rid of the old version. That doesn't make it so errata is a new edition.
Is this "errata" (I really hate that misused term)? Few too many changes to count as such to me. The same with MMotM, frankly.
 

darjr

I crit!
That's not entirely correct: Shawn Merwin and Teos Abadia are regular contract writers for WotC.

Wouldn't be unique: you can practically hear Teos turn white when he slips in "who onows, maybe something like that is in the works.." and Merwin moves on Very Quickly...plenty of room for plausible deniability.

It seems a likely subject for the Planescape Slipcase, at any rate.

I doubt they slipped up. As far as I know it's public info that both of them have been NDA with WotC and involved with making D&D behind the scenes since at least early testing of 4e.

Teos is a huge tease. And Shawn isn't. I think that explains it.

But I also think it's probably a no brainer that Modrons have a very high chance to be the thing in planescape.
 

Levistus's_Leviathan

5e Freelancer
Is this "errata" (I really hate that misused term)? Few too many changes to count as such to me. The same with MMotM, frankly.
They've changed quite a bit with errata in 5e. Class features, spells, and other pretty major mechanical parts of 5e have changed substantially.

And are you referring to the race changes in Monsters of the Multiverse as a new edition? Because the monsters barely changed at all. And races in 5e have changed quite substantially in the past through errata, too (Tritons getting Darkvision through Theros, Goliaths getting Cold Resistance through Rime of the Frostmaiden, etc).

I'm not saying that OneD&D is an errata. It will probably be treated like Volo's and Mordenkainen's were after Monsters of the Multiverse. The older stuff is "Legacy 5e".
 


Nikosandros

Golden Procrastinator
Hard to say its not a new edition when you relegate the 2014 books to old content only accessible if you already own it, but I'm sure they'll find some way to spin it.
I think it is quite possible that the revised books might be available electronically in a different way, perhaps - as already mentioned - by subscription and not by purchase.
 

Weiley31

Legend
Depends on the modron's rank - some of the base-level ones are indeed geometric shapes similar to dice (monodrones, tridrones, and quadrones especially), but it becomes far less true once you get into the hierarch-tier modrons.
Well, playing as the lower tier Modrons seem like the pc options. Higher tiers are NPCs.
 

Well, playing as the lower tier Modrons seem like the pc options. Higher tiers are NPCs.
Generally speaking, any PC modron is going to be a "rogue modron", which is presumably what the "Glitchling" from the recent UA was "secretly" playtesting (and/or possibly replacing - traditionally, rogue modrons transform into a quadrone upon "going rogue" regardless of their original rank, but the glitchling allows for a more freeform body type).

Playing a non-rogue modron would be like playing a Borg drone from Star Trek that is still fully tied into the Borg Collective - there's not much individual will there.
 
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I think it is quite possible that the revised books might be available electronically in a different way, perhaps - as already mentioned - by subscription and not by purchase.
That's possible, but I suspect it would cause something of an uproar if it was the only digital way.

I think what is more likely is we'll see something like the follow:

1) You can technically buy the 1D&D PHB/DMG/MM for $49.99 each (that's after the digital "reduction" lol). If you do, you own them just like the current PHB/DMG/etc.

2) Or you can spend a bit more and order the physical edition for $69.99 each (or a slipcase set for "only" $199.99) + shipping, via Beyond/WotC, which will also give you digital copies on Beyond (WotC have specifically mentioned the Beyond acquisition enabling them to do stuff like this).

3) If you subscribe to the "Master"-level subscription (currently $5.99/month and aimed at DMs) you get access to the 1D&D PHB/DMG/MM for the duration of your subscription as well as the other benefits.

This would be a strong push to move people on to the subscription, and as everyone who does subs knows, once you get people on, they often just fail to cancel even when they're not using something (btw I think tech may solve this eventually but it'll be opposed/undermined by big money if anyone tries - still I'd pay for something that started remind me to cancel stuff if it noticed I hadn't logged in to or used it for X weeks, sorry I digress).

You may even get some other books or at least the mechanical content of them as they come out, perhaps for a slightly higher sub - $8.99/month, say). This is how the DDI worked.

If you have the existing 5E stuff, you'll still be able to use it as a "legacy" option, but the Beyond team won't bother to support it beyond that, and won't fix even existing issues with that stuff, and when it turns out that it breaks in 2030 and X "legacy" class just doesn't work right anymore, it'll be absolutely bottom priority for Beyond to fix, and if you complain about it publicly, 70% of responses will be from 1D&D boosters telling you in terms ranging from the gentle to the brutal that you're a loser who needs to get with the times.
 

He's specifically over digital products only, FYI.
That is absolutely not correct, I'm afraid. Unless you're somehow not referring to Dan Rawson, in which case I don't know who you mean.

Here's the actual press release, not the slightly misleading articles which paraphrase it as if it was news-news (not meaning ENworld there, ENworld's one is fine):


And the exact relevant quote:

Press Release said:
In this new role, he will lead overall Dungeons & Dragons brand growth and profitability across digital, physical, and entertainment.

That is explicit. He is over the whole of D&D, not just digital. It's just his expertise is 100% about digital transformation, i.e. taking people from physical to digital, and taking people from licence-purchase to subscription models, it appears.
 


Your idea is also certainly possible and, from my POV, preferable. We'll have to wait and see.
Well, maybe. To be clear I don't think what I'm presenting is genuinely and honestly a "good idea" from the perspective of either players or the longer-term (10-year+) health of D&D as a hobby and particularly as a TTRPG.

I just think it's what they're likely to do, because it's the best way to extract the maximum profit from the situation whilst increasingly converting people to subscription users without causing some kind of uproar.

I think the place what I've described ends up is, basically, over 10 years, D&D is divided essentially into "people who play 1D&D" who use the subscription method, and life-stylers, who mostly use D&D for the pretty books and owlbear plushies and so on, and this thing they maybe played for a couple of years when the kids were 10-12, and who probably watch Critical Role and so on, who buy the physical books and may or may not also subscribe. Then over the 10 years after that, the division becomes starker, with D&D online probably using optional AI tools to DM etc., and essentially trending towards being a kind of weird MMO, and offline basically being not intended to be played, merely to be decorative. And that's assuming there isn't some kind of crash, because if there is, and D&D has moved to a sub-centric model, welp, WotC may just basically maintenance mode D&D, and not in a good way.
 


I think the place what I've described ends up is, basically, over 10 years, D&D is divided essentially into "people who play 1D&D" who use the subscription method, and life-stylers, who mostly use D&D for the pretty books and owlbear plushies and so on, and this thing they maybe played for a couple of years when the kids were 10-12, and who probably watch Critical Role and so on, who buy the physical books and may or may not also subscribe. Then over the 10 years after that, the division becomes starker, with D&D online probably using optional AI tools to DM etc., and essentially trending towards being a kind of weird MMO, and offline basically being not intended to be played, merely to be decorative. And that's assuming there isn't some kind of crash, because if there is, and D&D has moved to a sub-centric model, welp, WotC may just basically maintenance mode D&D, and not in a good way.
I don't know about this. I think everyone at WotC and certainly many people at Hasbro know how White Wolf screwed itself over by focusing for much of the 1990s on book buyers rather than game players, to the point that many of their later books were less and less usable and how badly things went when they tried to wrench themselves back on track. They've never recovered and have become a brand in someone else's portfolio as a result.

I do think you're right about lifestyle D&D fans, but I don't think it necessarily follows that they will produce unplayable books. In fact, it's not terribly hard to continue to design for ease at the table, as those good design principles that don't require computer assistance are simply better design and easier to manage and balance. (It doesn't do to go poking around at the math underlying EverQuest, as that can lead to madness and despair.) But more lifestyle products like art books, plush toys, iconic magic items (there's only so many big artifacts in the game, so I'd expect to see more would-be iconic stuff showing up in future products, for possible merchandising opportunities) all seem likely.

I think we'll likely also see a sun-setting of D&D Online and similar previous generation MMO-related efforts at some point and another attempt with more resources and probably (alas) a free to play model more similar to Fortnite and Overwatch (although hopefully not nearly as aggressive as Diablo Immortal, although I guess it remains to be seen how profitable that works out to be).
 

Playing a non-rogue modron would be like playing a Borg drone from Star Trek that is still fully tied into the Borg Collective - there's not much individual will there.
Yeah, it's possible to have a modron (or Borg) in your party as a productive member, but it's going to be a lot easier and probably more satisfying for everyone if they're an NPC exposition machine/plot generator.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I don't know about this. I think everyone at WotC and certainly many people at Hasbro know how White Wolf screwed itself over by focusing for much of the 1990s on book buyers rather than game players, to the point that many of their later books were less and less usable and how badly things went when they tried to wrench themselves back on track. They've never recovered and have become a brand in someone else's portfolio as a result.

I do think you're right about lifestyle D&D fans, but I don't think it necessarily follows that they will produce unplayable books. In fact, it's not terribly hard to continue to design for ease at the table, as those good design principles that don't require computer assistance are simply better design and easier to manage and balance. (It doesn't do to go poking around at the math underlying EverQuest, as that can lead to madness and despair.) But more lifestyle products like art books, plush toys, iconic magic items (there's only so many big artifacts in the game, so I'd expect to see more would-be iconic stuff showing up in future products, for possible merchandising opportunities) all seem likely.

I think we'll likely also see a sun-setting of D&D Online and similar previous generation MMO-related efforts at some point and another attempt with more resources and probably (alas) a free to play model more similar to Fortnite and Overwatch (although hopefully not nearly as aggressive as Diablo Immortal, although I guess it remains to be seen how profitable that works out to be).
Honestly maintaining D&D as a lifestyle brand is better in my estimation than constant mucking about with the core game mechanics. And I doubt they will ever stop producing a paper version of the game, just more of what we have seen for the past 8 years already pretty much.
 


Nikosandros

Golden Procrastinator
Well, maybe. To be clear I don't think what I'm presenting is genuinely and honestly a "good idea" from the perspective of either players or the longer-term (10-year+) health of D&D as a hobby and particularly as a TTRPG.
I just meant that it looked preferable to the other option, i.e. no possibility of non-subscription digital purchases. I agree in general with all the points you make in this post.
 

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