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5E 5e Updates: Mythic, Epic, and Hardcore Monsters, Equipment, & Magic

dave2008

Legend
Sword
Large celestial (archon), lawful good
1602843077881.png

Armor Class 16 (natural armor)
Hit Points 133 (14d10 + 56)
Speed 40 ft., fly 90 ft.
1602843079251.png

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
20 (+5)16 (+3)17 (+3)16 (+3)17 (+3)18 (+4)
1602790927287.png

Savings Throws Con +8, Wis +7, Cha +8
Skills Acrobatics +7, Intimidation +9, Perception +7
Damage Resistances radiant; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing that is nonmagical
Damage Immunities lightning
Condition Immunities petrified
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 17
Languages All, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 10 (5,900 XP)
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Arm Blades. The sword archon can use a bonus action to transform its hands into flaming swords or back into hands.

Aura of Menace. The first time an enemy of the archon comes within 30 feet of it or starts its turn in that radius, it must make a DC 16 Wisdom check or become frightened of the archon for 1 minute, or until it takes damage. Attack roles against a frightened enemy have advantage.

Celestial Weapons. The archon’s weapon attacks are magical. When the archon hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 1d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).

Dive. If the archon is flying and dives at least 30 feet straight towards a target and then hits it with a melee weapon attack, that attack deals an extra 9 (2d8) damage to the target.

Innate Spellcasting. The archon’s spell casting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 16, +8 to hit with attack spells). I can innately cast the following spells requiring no components:

At will: aid, continual flame, detect evil and good
3/day each: cure wounds (4th level), protection from evil and good, dispel magic
1/day each: banishment, bless, teleport

Magic Resistance (3/day). The archon has advantage on saving throws against spells and magical effects.

ACTIONS
Multiattack.
The archon makes two arm blade attacks..

Arm Blade. Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (2d8+5) slashing damage plus 7 (2d6) fire damage and 4 (1d8) radiant damage.

Flyby Furry (Recharge 4-6). The archon moves up to its speed and makes one arm blade attack against each creature within its reach during the move. When the archon moves away from a creature it has just attacked, it does not provoke opportunity attacks from that creature.

REACTIONS
Parry.
The archon adds 4 to its AC against one melee or ranged attack that would hit it. To do so the archon must see the attacker and have its hands transformed into arm blades.
 
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dave2008

Legend
Trumpet
Medium celestial (archon), lawful good
1602843382774.png

Armor Class
20 (natural armor)
Hit Points 190 (20d8 + 100)
Speed 30 ft., fly 90 ft.
1602843379323.png

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
21 (+5)18 (+4)20 (+5)18 (+4)20 (+5)22 (+6)
1602843392938.png

Savings Throws Con +10, Wis +10, Cha +11
Skills Insight +9, Perception +10, Persuasion +11, Religion +10
Damage Resistances necrotic, radiant; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing that is nonmagical
Damage Immunities lightning
Condition Immunities exhaustion, frightened, petrified
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 20
Languages All, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 13 (10,000 XP)
1602843395006.png

Aura of Menace. The first time an enemy of the archon comes within 40 feet of it or starts its turn in that radius, it must make a DC 18 Wisdom check or become frightened of the archon for 1 minute, or until it takes damage. Attack roles against a frightened enemy have advantage.

Celestial Weapons. The archon’s weapon attacks are magical. When the archon hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 3d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).

Elusive. Unless the archon is incapacitated, attack rolls against it cannot have advantage.

Innate Spellcasting. The archon’s spell casting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 18, +10 to hit with attack spells). I can innately cast the following spells requiring no components:

At will: aid, continual flame, detect evil and good, dispel magic
3/day each: cure wounds (5th level), protection from evil and good
1/day each: banishment, blade barrier, bless, teleport

Magic Resistance. The archon has advantage on saving throws against spells and magical effects.

Rally. The archon chooses one friendly creature that can see or hear it and uses a bonus action to bolsters its resolve. The creature gains 12 (1d12 + 6) temporary hit points. The hit points remain until the end of the archon’s next turn, or until they are expended.

Trumpet. The archon’s trumpet is capable of producing divine music of incredible beauty or paralyzing awe when played by archon. In addition, the archon can transform the trumpet into a greatsword and back again as a bonus action.

The trumpet transforms into a useless chunk of metal when not in the possession of its owner.

ACTIONS
Multiattack.
The archon makes two melee attacks.

Greatsword. Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 12 (2d6+5) slashing damage plus and 13 (3d8) radiant damage.

Trumpet (recharge 6). The archon blows its trumpet, and all creatures within 120 feet of the archon that can hear it, and that the archon wishes, must make a DC 19 Charisma saving throw or be paralyzed for 1 minute. A paralyzed creature can make another saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Celestial Lightning (recharge 5-6). The archon magically creates and bolt of lightning that arcs from it to a target it can see within 90 feet it. The bolt continues to jump to additional targets within 30 feet of each previous target. It makes three jumps or until there is no target within range. Each target must make a DC 16 Dexterity saving throw, taking 35 (6d10) lightning damage on a failure or half as much damage on a success; or it regains 35 (6d10) hit points, the archon’s choice.

REACTIONS
Inspire.
The archon chooses one friendly creature that can see or hear it and will miss with an attack roll. The creature gains a +6 (1d12) bonus to the triggering attack role. If the attack is a hit, the archon can choose to change the attacks damage type to radiant damage.
 
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dave2008

Legend
Throne
Large celestial (archon), lawful good
1602844290749.png

Armor Class 20 (+2 plate armor)
Hit Points 247 (21d10 + 126)
Speed 40 ft., fly 120 ft.
1602844289740.png

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
25 (+7)21 (+5)22 (+6)20 (+5)22 (+6)24 (+7)
1602844286546.png

Savings Throws Con +12, Wis +12, Cha +13
Skills Insight +11, Perception +12, Persuasion +13, Religion +12
Damage Resistances necrotic, radiant; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing that is nonmagical
Damage Immunities lightning
Condition Immunities charmed, exhaustion, frightened, petrified
Senses darkvision 120 ft., truesight 60 ft., passive Perception 22
Languages All, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 17 (18,000 XP)
1602844287836.png

Aura of Menace. The first time an enemy of the archon comes within 50 feet of it or starts its turn in that radius, it must make a DC 20 Wisdom check or become frightened of the archon for 1 minute, or until it takes damage. Attack roles against a frightened enemy have advantage.

Celestial Weapons. The archon’s weapon attacks are magical. When the archon hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 4d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).

Flyby Attack. When the archon flies at least 20 feet before attacking a target, it doesn’t provoke an opportunity when it flies out of reach of that same target.

Innate Spellcasting. The archon’s spell casting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 20, +12 to hit with attack spells). I can innately cast the following spells requiring no components:

At will: aid, continual flame, detect evil and good, dispel magic
3/day: banishment, cure wounds (6th level), greater restoration, protection from evil and good, teleport
1/day each: banishing smite, blade barrier, bless, resurrection

Magic Resistance. The archon has advantage on saving throws against spells and magical effects.

Greatsword. The archon’s greatsword acts as a vorpal sword while in the archon’s possession. In addition, the archon can use a bonus action to instantly summon its sword back to its hand.

ACTIONS
Multiattack.
The archon makes two melee attacks or three light ray attacks.

Greatsword. Melee Weapon Attack: +13 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 21 (4d6+7) slashing damage plus 18 (4d8) radiant damage.

Light Ray. Ranged Spell Attack. +12 to hit, range 180 ft., one target. Hit. 14 (4d6) radiant damage.

Penitentiary Gaze. The archon targets one non-lawful good creature it can see within 120 feet of it. If the target can see the archon, the target must succeed on a DC 20 Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save the creature is consumed with remorse and is paralyzed for 1 minute. A paralyzed creature can make another saving throw at the end of each of its turns. On a success the effect ends for it and it gains one level of exhaustion.

Celestial Lightning (recharge 5-6). The archon magically creates and bolt of lightning that arcs from it to a target it can see within 120 feet of it. The bolt continues to jump to additional targets within 60 feet of each previous target. It makes three jumps or until there is no target within range. Each target must make a DC 20 Dexterity saving throw, taking 45 (8d10) lightning damage on a failure or half as much damage on a success; or it regains 45 (8d10) hit points, the archon’s choice.

Teleport. The archon magically teleports, along with any equipment it is wearing or carrying, up to 120 feet to an unoccupied space it can see.

REACTIONS
Parry.
The archon adds 4 to its AC against one melee or ranged attack that would hit it. To do so the archon must see the attacker and have a melee weapon or shield.

LEGENDARY ACTIONS
The archon can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action option can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. If the archon has unspent legendary actions at the end of the round, it may spend and immediately use its remaining legendary actions. The archon regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Spellcasting. The archon casts an at will spell.
Teleport. The archon uses its Teleport action.
Light Ray (Cost 2 Actions). The archon makes a Light Ray attack.
 
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dave2008

Legend
Throne General
Large celestial (archon), lawful good
1602895912423.png

Armor Class 21 (+3 plate armor)
Hit Points 247 (21d10 + 126)
Speed 40 ft., fly 120 ft.
1602895913676.png

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
25 (+7)21 (+5)22 (+6)23 (+6)22 (+6)25 (+7)
1602895915157.png

Savings Throws Con +12, Int +12, Wis +12, Cha +13
Skills Insight +11, Perception +12, Persuasion +13, Religion +12
Damage Resistances necrotic, radiant; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing that is nonmagical
Damage Immunities lightning
Condition Immunities charmed, exhaustion, frightened, petrified
Senses darkvision 120 ft., truesight 60 ft., passive Perception 22
Languages All, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 17 (18,000 XP)
1602895916330.png

Aura of Menace. The first time an enemy of the archon comes within 50 feet of it or starts its turn in that radius, it must make a DC 20 Wisdom check or become frightened of the archon for 1 minute, or until it takes damage. Attack roles against a frightened enemy have advantage.

Blessing of Celestia (Mythic Trait, recharges after a short or long rest). If the archon is reduced to 0 hit points, it doesn’t die or fall unconscious. Instead, all conditions and effects the archon is suffering end for it, it regains 200 hit points, and all of its abilities recharge.

Celestial Weapons. The archon’s weapon attacks are magical. When the archon hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 4d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).

Flyby Attack. When the archon flies at least 20 feet before attacking a target, it doesn’t provoke an opportunity when it flies out of reach of that same target.

Innate Spellcasting. The archon’s spell casting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 20, +12 to hit with attack spells). I can innately cast the following spells requiring no components:

At will: aid, continual flame, detect evil and good, dispel magic
3/day: banishment, cure wounds (6th level), greater restoration, protection from evil and good, teleport
1/day each: banishing smite, blade barrier, bless, resurrection

Magic Resistance. The archon has advantage on saving throws against spells and magical effects.

Greatsword. The archon’s greatsword acts as a vorpal sword while in the archon’s possession. In addition, the archon can use a bonus action to instantly summon its sword back to its hand.

ACTIONS
Multiattack.
The archon makes two melee attacks or three light ray attacks.

Greatsword. Melee Weapon Attack: +13 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 21 (4d6+7) slashing damage plus 18 (4d8) radiant damage.

Light Ray. Ranged Spell Attack. +12 to hit, range 180 ft., one target. Hit. 14 (4d6) radiant damage.

Penitentiary Gaze. The archon targets one non-lawful good creature it can see within 120 feet of it. If the target can see the archon, the target must succeed on a DC 20 Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save the creature is consumed with remorse and is paralyzed for 1 minute. A paralyzed creature can make another saving throw at the end of each of its turns. On a success the effect ends for it and it gains one level of exhaustion.

Celestial Lightning (recharge 5-6). The archon magically creates and bolt of lightning that arcs from it to a target it can see within 120 feet of it. The bolt continues to jump to additional targets within 60 feet of each previous target. It makes three jumps or until there is no target within range. Each target must make a DC 20 Dexterity saving throw, taking 45 (8d10) lightning damage on a failure or half as much damage on a success; or it regains 45 (8d10) hit points, the archon’s choice.

Teleport. The archon magically teleports, along with any equipment it is wearing or carrying, up to 120 feet to an unoccupied space it can see.

REACTIONS
Parry.
The archon adds 4 to its AC against one melee or ranged attack that would hit it. To do so the archon must see the attacker and have a melee weapon or shield.

LEGENDARY ACTIONS
The archon can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action option can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. If the archon has unspent legendary actions at the end of the round, it may spend and immediately use its remaining legendary actions. The archon regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Spellcasting. The archon casts an at will spell.
Teleport. The archon uses its Teleport action.
Light Ray (Cost 2 Actions). The archon makes a Light Ray attack.

MYTHIC ACTIONS
If the archon's mythic trait is active, it can use the options below as legendary actions for 1 hour after using Blessing of Celestia.

Commanding Strike. The archon directs one of its allies that it can see and that can see or hear it to make an attack. If the ally can use its reaction to make one weapon attack, adding 10 (3d6) radiant damage on a hit.
Evasive Maneuver. The archon commands one ally that can see or hear the archon into a more advantageous position. The creature can use its reaction to move up to half its speed without provoking opportunity attacks and it has advantage on its next attack.
Greatsword (Costs 2 Actions). The archon makes a greatsword attack.

The Throne General as a Mythic Encounter
The throne general is a challenging foe under typical conditions; however, you can increase the challenge by using the Blessing of Celestia trait. When this happens, the archon calls on the grace of the Hebdomad, heals its wounds, and can then choose one of its mythic actions when it uses a legendary action.

Read or paraphrase the following text when the seraphim uses its Blessing of Celestia trait:

Future descriptive text goes here

Fighting the Throne General as a mythic encounter is equivalent to taking on two CR 17 creatures in one encounter. Award a party 36,000 XP for defeating the Throne General after it uses Blessing of Celestia.
 
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Stalker0

Legend
OK, I will take another crack at it. I guess it makes sense to me as I let my spell casters spend spell slots and make arcana checks to do magical things outside their spell list.

EDIT: I've revised to include a heat option.
Looks good! I like the ice bolt change as well.

Also FYI, I took a look at savage's bonus. If you assume a PC AC of 19 at that level (aka plate +1), that's a crit chance of 25% to give you context.
 

dave2008

Legend
Looks good! I like the ice bolt change as well.

Also FYI, I took a look at savage's bonus. If you assume a PC AC of 19 at that level (aka plate +1), that's a crit chance of 25% to give you context.
Thanks - I assume you mean a 25% chance when the dragon has advantage?
 


Stalker0

Legend
CR check on the white dragon. I'm getting a Defensive CR 14 (including the 4 saves), and an offensive CR 16 with breath + multi + multi. That is not factoring in any bonus crit damage from savage.

Also something I just realized, have you been adding in the Dragon's frightful presence into CR calculations? I just realized I have not been, and its actually one of the specific creature abilities with HP adjustments.
 

dave2008

Legend
CR check on the white dragon. I'm getting a Defensive CR 14 (including the 4 saves), and an offensive CR 16 with breath + multi + multi. That is not factoring in any bonus crit damage from savage.
I'm getting:
Defensive CR 14
Offensive CR 15, however I just checked my spreadsheet and I was only calculating 1 claw attack instead of two. With that added back in I am getting an offensive CR of 17+. So I will need to get that fixed - damn spreadsheet!
Also something I just realized, have you been adding in the Dragon's frightful presence into CR calculations? I just realized I have not been, and its actually one of the specific creature abilities with HP adjustments.
Generally I do not. The DMG says: "Increase effective HP by 25% if monsters face PCs of level 10 or lower" I generally assume dragons with Frightful Presence are taking on PCs of 11th level or higher, but that is questionable for some of the lower CR adult dragons.
 

Stalker0

Legend
Generally I do not. The DMG says: "Increase effective HP by 25% if monsters face PCs of level 10 or lower" I generally assume dragons with Frightful Presence are taking on PCs of 11th level or higher, but that is questionable for some of the lower CR adult dragons.
Oh right!

I think that's fine for CR 14+, while I absolutely think you might have a lower level party than 10th fight them, that is intentionally billed as a major challenge. So I think its fine.
 

dave2008

Legend
CR check on the white dragon. I'm getting a Defensive CR 14 (including the 4 saves), and an offensive CR 16 with breath + multi + multi. That is not factoring in any bonus crit damage from savage.
I had to get rid of the "brutal" trait completely and make a few other changes to get the CR back in line, but it is working now.
 


Stalker0

Legend
I had to get rid of the "brutal" trait completely and make a few other changes to get the CR back in line, but it is working now.
Juggernaut is an interesting ability, kind of a midway point between a move and a move with no OAs.

Just nothing there are still no spells for the dragon in case that was missed.

I also just noticed that the dragon's breath tactics lists a "death breath" for the Great Wyrm, but didn't see that noted in the Great Wyrm stat block. I would also say its definitely a CR adjustment to me, the ability to kill a PC at 0 HP is a big combat factor.
 

dave2008

Legend
Juggernaut is an interesting ability, kind of a midway point between a move and a move with no OAs.
It seemed more like a Brute approach to me.
Just nothing there are still no spells for the dragon in case that was missed.
I am aware, I will get to them before I start filling out the rest of the ages. I still need to update the Adult Black too. It is a bit crazy here at the moment and I haven't had as much time to work on these.
I also just noticed that the dragon's breath tactics lists a "death breath" for the Great Wyrm, but didn't see that noted in the Great Wyrm stat block. I would also say its definitely a CR adjustment to me, the ability to kill a PC at 0 HP is a big combat factor.
So you caught that. ;)

It is an hidden extra, only for those who want to use dragon tactics. I'm still undecided about it and whether or not I put it in the stat block. The Great Wyrm, doesn't have its own stat block, so it is a bit odd to include it in the Wyrm stat block. However, I do have a solution for that.

Regarding death, I get what your saying. However, death doesn't factor into the CR of low level PCs where it is a real threat, nor is there any CR adjustment for creatures with the disintegrate spell or similar death affects. Also, at these CRs, 26-30, PCs will be lvl 17-20 and are likely to have access to Resurrection if not True Resurrection.
 

Stalker0

Legend
Regarding death, I get what your saying. However, death doesn't factor into the CR of low level PCs where it is a real threat, nor is there any CR adjustment for creatures with the disintegrate spell or similar death affects. Also, at these CRs, 26-30, PCs will be lvl 17-20 and are likely to have access to Resurrection if not True Resurrection.
Its fair to say, that at the CRs your talking about realistically everything is on the table, so its probably fair that it shouldn't have a CR adjustment...as much as anything should have really at those levels.

In fact, in some ways you could argue its a proper high level balance mechanic.

At high levels (heck starting as low as ~5th level, but definitely in your upper teens), the amount of damage in a single attack is far less deadly than the amount of damage instances a monster can generate...because of the crazy way that the damage threshold and the death saves work.

If you take a 20th level character for example, we could assume a rough ~200 HP on average (d8 and +2 con). Unless you are doing an attack that deals 200 damage, it all amounts to the same thing, an unconscious character. So in that respect, a dragon who is doing 3 or so attack has a far greater chance to do "real damage" (aka generate failed death saves or even generate an actual death) than a dragon unleashing its full breath weapon. This is actually something to note for your small dragon damage attacks (like ignite or dread whispers). Those small damage values do matter in triggering death saves, so they might actually be more deadly to a character than a dragon that had a 50% more damaging breath but no small instance attacks.

But the deadly breath brings the super damage back into the realm of deadliness, as now an attack only has to do your remaining hitpoints to kill you, which is a LOT more often. And considering that to fight a CR 30 you are fighting a creature a full 10 CR over your level (which in game terms should be a "nigh impossible" task), it seems reasonable that unless you bring some crazy effects or planning to bear, you are just going to get mowed down.
 


Stalker0

Legend
Hound: I am actually a little worried about the power level for this guy, as the damage really matters at these low CRs. With the combination of pack tactics and incapacitation, crit chances are high. The greatsword damage alone could slice up a level 2 character with 1 hit, let alone 3 (including the bite).

So the damage is already a tough enough effect but when you include the incapacitation you have a real recipe for just destroying a player outright in one round. In theory he is a glass cannon with low hp, but with the Aid for a little buff and the resistance against nonmagic weapon that probably applies a great deal at these CRs he is tanky enough. In summary, his stats fit by the book, this is when my DM experience pulls up a possible red flag.

Lantern: I love everything except sacred illumination. This is a surprisingly potent effect for such low levels, you are going to be effected all day with a good chance to be effected for a day or two, that's rough! I would say the effect at least goes away automatically with a rest.

Owl: For petrifying gaze, I would include the same language as the basilisk as far as averting your eyes. I feel like that is a key balancing mechanic of the gaze at these CRs, as the effect is very nasty but it gives the players some direct control of whether to take the risk or not. Did you assume expertise in perception as the default with the owl, or does the DM still pick an additional skill to have expertise?

Guardian: My CR calcs don't match with yours on this one. I'm getting an offensive CR 5 if you assume the two claws with no bite, combined with a CR 13 defense if you are factoring in the BPS, for a CR 9. Regardless the strength save is a touch low for the offensive CR.
 

dave2008

Legend
OK, first I will admit that most of are several years old and I didn't check them all thoroughly before post them. With that in mind I will get into your comments - and thank you for them!
Hound: I am actually a little worried about the power level for this guy, as the damage really matters at these low CRs. With the combination of pack tactics and incapacitation, crit chances are high. The greatsword damage alone could slice up a level 2 character with 1 hit, let alone 3 (including the bite).

So the damage is already a tough enough effect but when you include the incapacitation you have a real recipe for just destroying a player outright in one round. In theory he is a glass cannon with low hp, but with the Aid for a little buff and the resistance against nonmagic weapon that probably applies a great deal at these CRs he is tanky enough. In summary, his stats fit by the book, this is when my DM experience pulls up a possible red flag.
First, I checked the CR and it was at 4, not 3 as listed. 2nd, I agree that incapacitated is way to strong for this low CR. I've replaced incapacitated and modified how the bite attack works.
Lantern: I love everything except sacred illumination. This is a surprisingly potent effect for such low levels, you are going to be effected all day with a good chance to be effected for a day or two, that's rough! I would say the effect at least goes away automatically with a rest.
I agree, It ends on a short or long rest now. I was corrected the DC (should have been 11).
Owl: For petrifying gaze, I would include the same language as the basilisk as far as averting your eyes. I feel like that is a key balancing mechanic of the gaze at these CRs, as the effect is very nasty but it gives the players some direct control of whether to take the risk or not. Did you assume expertise in perception as the default with the owl, or does the DM still pick an additional skill to have expertise?
Petrifying gaze. The big different between the Owl archon and a basilisk or medusa is that those monsters petrifying effects are passive and always on and effects all creatures within range. So those monsters gaze is every round against all creatures. The Owl is one creature, most likely once a combat. To me that is the balancing factor. I did add that the tears of an archon can eliminate the effect, giving DMs an option if the party doesn't have access to greater restoration.

I'm guessing you are talking about Lore Master? The Owl archon has expertise in perception as indicated by the skill bonus. This is not called out, just like for dragons and other creatures in the MM. Lore Master is different and doesn't apply to a specific skill, but any check used within the Owl's area of knowledge. Whether a "skill" applies or not. Basically, a DM doesn't have to worry about finding the right skill for an Owl archon to recall knowledge regarding its field, the archon gets the benefit of expertise and advantage.
Guardian: My CR calcs don't match with yours on this one. I'm getting an offensive CR 5 if you assume the two claws with no bite, combined with a CR 13 defense if you are factoring in the BPS, for a CR 9. Regardless the strength save is a touch low for the offensive CR.
Are you talking about the Warden or the Warden Guardian? The Warden Guardian would make 2 Glaive attacks, not two claw attacks. However, I forgot to figure Aura of Menace for both of them. Regarding the strength save, WotC often takes 10 on these, but given that it has prof. in Athletics, it makes sense to to give it the full DC treatment. Corrected now. Here is my updated CR breakdown:

For the Guardian I get:
Defensive CR 10 (178 effective HP = 8 + 2 for effective AC of 21)
Offensive CR 8 (51 DPR = 8, no attack adjustment)
Total CR: 9.5

For the Warden I get:
Defensive CR 10 (178 effective HP = 8 + 2 for effective AC of 20)
Offensive CR 6-7 (41-46 DPR depending on how often you assume it can get a bite attack, no attack adjustment)
Total CR: 8-8.5
 


dave2008

Legend
THE GRECO-ROMAN MYTHOS
Greek and Roman mythology has a long and influential history in western culture and throughout the world. What follows here is not that story. The stories the ancient Greeks and Romans told of the gods, goddess, and other immortals were tales of remarkable beings that acted and behaved much like humans, but on a grander scale. That is not the story we are telling. Yes, the stories and descriptions provided here will have much in common with the Greek and Roman mythology it is inspired by, but they are not the same stories. The version of the myths and characters presented here is unique to this “Greco-Roman Mythos,” a version of the tales, but not the version. The lore presented throughout the various “Mythos" posts attempts to create a unique blend and viewpoint of the stories of myth, the lore of the Dungeons and Dragons multiverse, and new legends.

If you wish to learn the history and stories of real life Greek and Roman Mythology, see the side bar: “Suggested Reading.” If you wish to learn about the Greco-Roman Mythos of the multiverse of the Mythic Updates, please read on.

Disclaimer:
This is a compendium of game statistics, guidelines, and role-playing details for the purpose of playing and engaging deities and monsters within the broader fantasy of the Dungeons and Dragons multiverse. These "Mythos" posts take a particular version of myth and religion, a small slice of its real wealth and beauty, and mixes and matches it with the legends and lore of a fantasy cosmos. Do not look unto "Mythos" for a history lesson, for the stories told within these pages, though similar in many ways to real mythologies and religions, are fictions created to suit the needs of DMs and players to enjoy running a role-playing game together.

Finally, these "Mythos" posts are not, in any way, a judgment on the validity or merit of any religion practiced, or that was practiced in the past. It is not intended to offend or disrespect any mythology or religion, or its practitioners; nor does it encourage or discourage belief in any of the mythologies or religions superficial covered in its pages. Additionally, the omission of any religion or mythology is not intended to reflect in anyway upon that religion’s value or merit.

IN THE BEGINNING
…there was Chaos, Order and the Void. Out of the Chaos arose the lords of the elemental maelstrom: the Primordial Titans and from the celestial realms of Order came forth the Gods. Between the realms of Order and Chaos resided the Void, a vast expanse of darkness and nothingness. For untold eons the Gods where content in their serene palaces and the Titans were satiated within their cacophonous Maelstrom. Eventually, ever restless, the Titans looked beyond their elemental realm at the empty stillness of the Void, a blank canvas on which they could work their will, and it beckoned to them.

From the Chaos, the Primordials ventured into the Void, bringing the raw energy and matter of the Maelstrom with them. With great haste and fever the Titans inundated the Void with wonderous creation and passionate destruction. They revealed in the process and cared less for the results or the aftermath left in the wake of their passing. They wrought and unwrought will equal desire and skill.

At first the celestials of Order watched the work of the Titans with mild interest and amusement. The Gods were delighted by the Titans works and awed by their destructive violence. However, it did not take long before the Gods to became fascinated with the possibilities the Void that Was. The Void had become unrefined, unstable mess that needed governorship and guidance, that only they could provide. Thus, the Gods came to the Void that Was and quickly set to work stabilizing and bringing Order to the infecting Chaos of the Primordials. They shaped, revised, and tethered the Titan's creation and seeded it with their own wonderous designs.

At first the Primordials took little notice of the machinations of the gods, they were too engaged in their own projects to take heed of what was happening in their wake. Eventually the Titans did look back and they did not like what had become of their creation. Enraged, the Titans first set about destroying the works of the Gods within the Void that Was; however, when the gods moved to protect their creations, the Primordials turned their ire and wrath on the meddlesome Gods themselves, and so began the War of the Void.

The Gods were unprepared for the initial onslaught of the Primordials and retreated from their ferocity and might. They knew the humiliation of fear and defeat for the first time. However, the Gods did not want to see their works ,or the lives of the mortals the fostered, destroyed. Therefore, they regrouped, organized, and fought back. The brought the full might of their Authority and the greater numbers of the celestial host to counter the disorganized and unruly Titans. The War stretched for eons and touched all parts of the Void that Was. The losses and destruction where great on both sides. However, eventually the gods and the celestial host pushed the Titans out of the Void that Was, back into the Elemental Maelstrom. Feeling Secure in their victory, but unwilling to pursue the Primordials into the elemental domains, the gods began to occupy, fortify, and bring order to the fringes of the Maelstrom. They separated fire from earth, water from air and gave each their place in the hopes that this would help thwart future attempts by the Titans to reclaim the Void that Was.

However, as the deities worked to tame the edge of Chaos, the Titans gathered their strength in the depths of the Maelstrom and prepared for a new offensive. While the Gods were distracted with their attempts to controll Chaos, the mightiest Primoridial, greater than any before or after, tore open a massive scare in reality and connected the Elemental Maelstrom to the Astral Bliss, creating a vast bridge between the two. The Titans and their armies of elementals poured through the Scare and into the divine realms. The elemental horde plundered the gilded palaces of the Gods and spread like a destructive wave. Many an Astral realm fell before the Gods could return and mount a proper defense. But the bold action of the Titans, was also their undoing.

As the Gods hurried to return to their realms to counter the primordial threat, a faction of deities headed to the Maelstrom and looked to heal the Scare. At great cost these gods smashed the planar bridge and closed the Reality Scare, cutting off the elemental armies from their source of power and reinforcements. With the flood halted, the Gods regained the advantage, whipped out the lesser elementals and then set upon their great Primoridal adversaries. After an age or more, the Gods had slain, imprisoned or banished the Primoridal Titans from their Astral homes. The gods had won, and they claimed Authority over the Multiverse.

When the War was over, all of reality had been changed in its aftermath: Chaos had suffered the regulation of Order, Order had been infected with Chaos, and the Void was no longer. What had been the Void was now a mixture of matter and energy, thought and time, and entropy. The union of the divine Order and the Chaos of the Titans had created something the Gods could not have created on their own. Unlike any other plane of existence, the Void that Was had become a balance of all Authorities. It was something unique and could not be recreated. In their wisdom, the Gods decided they would leave it as it had become. They would refrain from direct interference and leave the accidental masterpiece to develop and grow on its own. They would instead inspire and shepherd the mortal lives that called it home. From the Void that Was, the Prime Material was born.

TitanWar_Small.JPG

TitanWar by SickJoe

Greco-Roman Mythology
In classical mythology the Olympians were only the gods and goddesses that resided on Mt. Olympus. Therefore, Hades was not included in their ranks. Additionally, Hestia was sometimes included, and Dionysus left out. I have decided to be more inclusive in my interpretation of the myths and incorporated Hades and both Hestia and Dionysus. Also, since the Olympians didn’t traditionally include a deity of magic in their ranks, and magic is so important in the worlds of Dungeons and Dragons, I added Hecate to fill that role for the Olympians.

THE OLYMPIANS
During the War, deities found that working together and combining their resources and Authority was very advantageous. There was security, strength, and synergy in forming partnerships with similarly inclined deities. From loose relationships of exalted, the gods formed tight nit organizations that helped them when the War. These organizations became another social structure in addition to a god’s Authority. In fact, these partnerships, known as Pantheons, became the guiding force in many deities’ social interactions and divine motivations.

The Olympic Pantheon. One of the first, if not the first, divine partnerships was the Olympic Pantheon. Founded by fourteen major deities who formed a close collaboration to fight the Titans and protect the realms of Order during the Void War. So strong was their combined might they where able to hold back the Primodial onslaught from their great mountain fortress. The Titans could advance no further, and this allowed the gods the time they needed to smash the Scare and turn the tide of the War. After the War they became known as the Olympians after their mighty fortress palace, Olympus, that was so instrumental in winning the First War.

After the Dawn War, the Olympians gathered many likeminded demigods and lesser deities to their banner and established one of the great pantheons of the cosmos. The founding deities took up leadership roles in the pantheon and continue to do so today. The original Olympians are (Roman names in parentheses):

Zeus (Jupiter) – god of the sky, thunder, and lightning; leader and “King” of the pantheon.

Hera (Juno) – goddess of marriage, family, and childbirth; “Queen” of the pantheon.

Poseidon (Neptune) – god of the seas, storms, and earthquakes; commander of the pantheon’s navy and second in command to Zeus.

Hades (Pluto) – god of the dead, lord of the underworld, and wealth; minister of the pantheon’s treasury and steward of the dead.

Athena (Minerva) – goddess of wisdom, handicraft, the city, and combat; general of the pantheon’s army and head of security / defense of Olympus.

Aphrodite (Venus) – goddess of love, passion, beauty, and procreation; ambassador of mortal and exalted affairs for the pantheon.

Demeter (Ceres) – goddess of the harvest, agriculture, and fertility (of the earth); Master of supplies and stores for the pantheon

Ares (Mars) – god of war, violence, and fear; field commander of the pantheon’s armies.

Apollo (Apollo) – god of light and the sun, healing, art, and prophecy; commander of the aerial infantry, bombardment, and chief medic for the pantheon

Artemis (Diana) – goddess of the hunt, wilderness, and the moon; commander of reconnaissance and elimination of aberrant threats for the pantheon.

Hecate (Hekate/Trivia) – goddess of magic and fate (crossroads); commander of the arcane arts and sorceress for the pantheon

Dionysus (Bacchus) – god of festivity, fertility, madness, and theatre; master of illusions and exalted relations for the pantheon.

Hermes (Mercury) – god of travelers, merchants, thieves, and orators; messenger and herald of the pantheon and commander of acquisitions.

Hephaestus (Vulcan) – god of fire, forge, craftsmanship, and artifice; blacksmith, armorer, and inventor for the pantheon.

Hestia (Vesta) – goddess of hearth, home, and state; head of internal affairs and ambassador to mortal affairs for the pantheon.

Planar Conquest. The Olympians where one of the first pantheons and they were also one of the most influential. Their divine palace was constructed on a fount of quintessence. This aided them in repelling the Titans, resulting in less loss of the resources, and provided the Olympians with the raw quintessence to lead, and some would say dominate, the reconstruction of Multiverse.

Soon after the War, the Olympians established control of major areas of reality, constructing realms in multiple planes: Acheron, Arborea, Elysium, Hades, and Tartarus to name a few. Instituting their rule and stewardship across the Multiverse from their seat of power on Olympus. Other pantheons and exalted followed their example, and would eventually challenge their rule in some areas, but none share the same breath and depth of planar territory that the Olympians control to this day.

When the power of mortal worship was discovered, the Olympians were one of the first pantheons to extend their grace to mortals and cultivate this resource as well. However, the fickle and fleeting lives of mortals were harder for the mighty Olympians to understand, and they never secured the Prime as they did other territories in much of the Outer Planes.

The Council of the Gods. The original partnership that was to become the Olympic Pantheon was a collaboration of fourteen deities, but they were lead by three mighty deities: Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus which each lead a cohort of deities, exarchs, and celestial attendants. During the War these three became brothers-in-arms and forged a great friendship, trust, and reliance on each other. When the War ended, the Three, as the had become to be called, had become so close they decided to formally combine their resources and followers. They chose to form a grand council of equals with the eleven additional original members of their alliance. Each council member would govern a cohort of their brethren and represent their interest at the Council of the Gods. All having an equal vote in determining the combined fate of the pantheon. A golden ideal to lead not just their pantheon, but all of the cosmos!

However, the Council, at times, became so unruly and divided it reminded the Three of the unbridled Titans at times! Therefor, the Three determined that one should be above the rest. One who could break ties and make final decision so that stalemates could progress and the work of the Council could bear fruit. Though the Council was constituted of beings of similar might and influence, Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades clearly stood above the rest. It was decided the Three should have a contest, with the winner taking the seat of High Arbiter of the Council. The remaining Council members devised games to challenge the contestants wits, their intellect, strength and athletic prowess. The competition was held in a grand forum at their mountain citadel of Olympus and was open to the entire pantheon. Though there were only three contestants, this is often considered the first Olympics.

In the end, though it was very close, all agreed that Zeus was victorious. He matched the great strength of Poseidon with agility and finesse, and he countered Hades shrewd intellect with his ingenuity and creativity. With their blessing, Zeus except the role of High Arbitrator, presiding over the Council as final judge and authority. Though he is sometimes referred to as the "King of the Gods," this is not accurate. He has the final decision, but he does not have the authority to go against the will of the Council.

To fill the vacancy left by Zeus' promotion, the Council selected the most renowned of their brethren that did not yet have a seat on the council, the god of festivals and fertility: Dionysus. This brought the Olympians to 14 council members with Zeus as the 15th and deciding member. Now the Council was complete and their wisdom has governed their realms of the Olympic Pantheon ever since.

Mt. Olympus. More to come!
The great mountain fortress of Olympus rises some 60,000 feet above the ardent fields, forests, and streams of the outer plane of Arborea. The Olympians raised the great mountain

The Gigantomachy. More to come!

Suggested Reading:
Metamorphoses by Ovid, translated* by A.D. Melville
The Aeneid by Virgil, translated* by John Dryden
The Iliad by Homer, translated* by Robert Fagles
The Odyssey by Homer, translated* by Robert Fagles
Theogony by Hesiod, translated* by M.L. West
The Library of Greek Mythology by Apollodorus, translated by Robin Hard
Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton
The Complete World of Greek Mythology by Richard Buxton
D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire
Greek Religion by Walter Burkert
The Penguin Dictionary of Classical Mythology by Pierre Grimal
Myth and Philosophy: A Contest of Truths by Lawrence J. Hatab
* translated to English
 
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