D&D 5E A Compilation of all the Race Changes in Monsters of the Multiverse

Over on Reddit, user KingJackel went through the video leak which came out a few days ago and manually compiled a list of all the changes to races in the book. The changes are quite extensive, with only the fairy and harengon remaining unchanged. The book contains 33 races in total, compiled and updated from previous Dungeons & Dragons books.

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

There are some good changes there (boosted natural weapon damage and the ability to choose your casting stat for racial abilities in particular), but on the whole I think it's a net negative.

The big one for me is the homogenisation of speeds and the removal of all detrimental traits (ie, daylight sensitivity) combined with the lack of any new ones being introduced (c'mon, stuff like disadvantage on Climb checks for centaurs is just a no-brainer). It's just a big step towards conservatism, homogenisation, and samey-ness in race design, and a step away from pushing the boundaries. I'd really expect the design team to be going the other way this deep into the edition's lifespan.

I can see how the fey-ification of goblinoids would work very well in some settings, but I think it's a mistake as a universal retcon. There's more settings where it wouldn't work than where it would. Goblins got the short end of the stick again, and they were none too great in the first place. That's a big shame for what should be a very common 'monstrous' PC race. And come on, they couldn't find the page count to just reprint Shape Water for the water genasi? And I really, really hate the ability to reconfigure your proficiencies on the fly every time you trance. It's just a bit of a slap in the face for the PC who actually selected a rare tool proficiency (or whatever) at level 1 for character reasons, and has carried it around ever since, rarely using it, and once the situation finally comes up when it's useful and it's that PCs turn to finally shine - the elf has a quick nap and suddenly knows it too. Uuuuuurgh.

Really disappointing for me. I dunno if I'll end up using it, cos i'm not the GM and it won't be my decision. But the thing that really bugs me - where were the speed changes etc in the UA? They run a damn UA, and don't put something that significant in there? Really annoys me. I know they do pay attention to UAs because they've sometimes made changes (generally rushed and poorly-thought-out) as a result of feedback, but I'll never understand why they pick and choose what they UA with such apparent abritrariness.
 
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dave2008

Legend
Besides what we already knew from the UAs, there are a number of implied core changes for the 2024 edition in here.
  • Will movement speeds more broadly be standardized? I assume the monsters in this book will tell us.
The preview someone posted in another thread (from a video) showing the duergar still had 25 ft speed in the monster stat block. It seems to be a PC thing?
  • Magic resistance being strictly limited to spells raises the question of what exactly those non-spell spells are, now, if not magical.
They are still magical, just not spells. Lots of PC classes have magical things that are not spells too.
 

dave2008

Legend
Really disappointing for me. I dunno if I'll end up using it, cos i'm not the GM and i won't be my decision. But the thing that really bugs me - where were the speed changes etc in the UA? They run a damn UA, and don't put something that significant in there? Really annoys me. I know they do pay attention to UAs because they've sometimes made changes (generally rushed and poorly-thought-out) as a result of feedback, but I'll never understand why they pick and choose what they UA with such apparent abritrariness.
this is an odd take to me. It is not like they have any responsibility to preview this with UA. Anything they provide early is just a nice bonus IMO.
 

Frozen_Heart

Adventurer
Lots of things I really like. Some things I dislike. The PB times per long rest is something I really like for species mechanics, as it keeps them scaling over the game.

It's nice to see certain genasi as less useless as they're my favourite race. However I absolutely hate the fact that they don't have their elemental cantrip, and it's instead been replaced with combat cantrips. Hopefully my DM will let me replace acid splash with shape water as it's far more on theme for a water genasi.

Sad that cunning artisan has gone. Sure it's cultural so shouldn't be linked to race. But they've not cut it off from race. They've just completely deleted it. At least bring it back as a feat or background feature please.
 

Zehnseiter

Explorer
That switch to PB uses of abilities is not really my cup of tea. It adds too much bookkeeping for my taste. I am more comfortable with either "per combat" abilities (you can use short rest here very well) or a pool of resources that powers all abilities. Less hassle to track. But then I never got too warm with 5E anyway. Those rule change won't really change anything on my opinion about the game.
 
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Frozen_Heart

Adventurer
I'm not a fan of PB based features on classes or subclasses due to the risk of multiclass shenanigans.

I like it on racial features as it keeps them scaling nicely over the course of the game and ensures they remain relevant even at later levels.
 


Kobold Stew

Last Guy in the Airlock
Supporter
I would have thought that WotC would have changed the goblin ability that was redundant with Rogue abilities. Goblin Rogues should be a no-brainer, but such an egregious redundant feature usually discourages Goblin Rogues.

For me, this is a plus. As I've noted elsewhere, every goblin is Rogue-like (as it were). This will increase the diversity of rogue builds, rather than reduce them.
 

Kobold Stew

Last Guy in the Airlock
Supporter
One thing not noticed yet:

The negative valence has been removed in the names of many of these abilities.
  • Orcs are no longer "aggressive"
  • Kobolds no longer "grovel cower and beg"
  • Hobgoblins no longer need to be "saving face"
  • even Kenku's duplication is no longer tied to forgery.

Even when the mechanical benefits remain unchanged (perhaps especially when), there is a moralizing aspect to these changes.
 



I'm very curious what the new lore for the goblinoids will be in the revised Monster Manual. Hobgoblins especially seem like they'll be getting an overhaul.

I'm curious if the kobold PC write-up reflects the changes to kobolds in general or if it's only for PCs. Have kobolds in general gone from being timid and reliant on traps to proud mini-Dragonborn, or are PCs the exception to the norm?

As a DM I'd personally keep the mechanics for Draconic Roar but allow a player to choose between the Grovel, Cower, and Beg and Draconic Roar flavor text for their own PC. A kobold fighter might use Draconic Roar, while a kobold rogue might use Grovel, Cower, and Beg.
 



Goblinoids are Fey now?

Wow this game has severely lost its way.
IIRC the D&D Next monster info stated that goblinoids were from the Feywild originally, but that was reversed in the Monster Manual. I feel like goblins and bugbears at least make sense as fey (the former as gremlin-like creatures and the latter as bogeymen), but hobgoblins are a bit of a headscratcher.
 

Overall I'm fine with these changes.

My biggest gripe is that humans in particular have been completely shafted by these changes plus Tasha's. I just don't see a reason to choose human anymore.

Also, I'm really starting to hate darkvision.

I like most of these changes overall. I'm especially intrigued by goblinoids now having an explicit fey connection. I'm curious on how that will be expanded on in the future.

Orcs getting Relentless Endurance. Hmm, does anyone want to put money on whether or not orcs will replace half-orcs as a race option in the 2024 edition?

I would be surprised if Half-Orcs survive the next revision. They don't add a huge amount to the game if orcs are as free willed as everyone else.

Half-Elves... I think they're a bit more likely to remain, but probably only because they appear in many more stories (Tolkien and Dragonlance, mainly).

Goblinoids are Fey now?

Wow this game has severely lost its way.

If anything, goblins being fey is going back to the source material. Redcaps have always been goblins and fairies. The erlking is variously portrayed as a goblin, and elf, and a fairy, and it's from a time when those meant basically the same thing. So, maybe not so much lost it's way as found it's way back to it.

It's not like the goblins in D&D are particularly well developed or differentiated from the other "1e humanoid" enemies. Now, if they made kobolds and goblins the same -- they have the same root word and share many of the same stories -- then I might agree with you because WotC have taken Kobolds into a unique and interesting path.
 




el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
Changes for the sake of changes

I don't know about that. I think I understand why most of these changes were made, but I still severely dislike a lot of these changes. I like short rest recharge powers, for example - and everyone knows how I feel about everyone moving the same speed.
 

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