Level Up (A5E) A Leveled-Up Bestiary: Volume Two

Faolyn

(she/her)
Tom Moldvay’s back for his fifth and final collection of undead, and here he focuses on spectres (he is kind enough to tell us this is the British spelling of specter), ghosts, and liches. For the ghost, he brings us the casurua (an Irish name which means red-hammer), which, like the previous tymher-haid, is a ghost made of the souls of multiple people.

The casurua was inspired by a 14th-century Irish tale of clan chief Roe Kerrigan--or rather, his wife, Marra, who was an ambitious and violent woman. She led numerous missions wherein she and her army would sneak into villages, fortresses, and castles and take them over, killing everyone who resisted. Her pillaging made her wealthy, and she also had three sons, but it wasn't enough. With five thousand soldiers behind her and two of her sons, Ailor and Brodon, next to her, she went to Castle Kelso, near Kilreekil, which was the home of her mortal enemy, the O'Downy clan, led by Ordlin O'Downey. But traveling with an army of 5,000, a thousand of which are on horseback, is not a stealthy way of approaching your enemy. And camping at a location that really only has one way in or out isn't that great an idea, as Marra and her army found herself beseiged by not only the O'Downeys, but many of their allied clans as well. The battle, the Battle of Bealaclugga Bog, lasted all day, and at the end of it, Marra and her sons were slain. But before she died, Marra Kerrigan spoke four words: Avenge Me, Never Cease.

Years passed and Marra's third son, Dulin, became ruler of their keep, and he spend his time scheming. Many years later, Ordlin O'Downey, who was traveling with a large retinue, was forced to take refuge in Kerrigan Keep during a flood. The wars between their clans were long over and there was peace, so Ordlin expected nothing untoward would happen--especially not that Dulin would spring a trap and slay them all. Dulin threw all the bodies in an unfinished tower room, then hastily built a floor over the bodies, then sealed the room.

The hauntings started centuries later. People who entered the keep, both proper heirs and others, would run screaming from it and throw themselves over the cliff into the Lough of Liscannor. In 1730, another man discovered documents that referenced the "graveyard room," and hired workmen to remove the floor and investigate. One workman descended into the darkness, there was the sound as if "a hundred stones were hurled against the wall," and when the man emerged, it was only to die from terrible blunt-force trauama injuries, with the marks of bloody hands all over his body--and the floor had been rebuilt. This happened again in the 1800s, save the man who had gone down to investigate lived for ten days before succumbing to his injuries, and reported seeing glowing eyes and skeletal hands, and again in 1924.

I can’t find anything about this particular legend other than the source that Moldvay cites, and my searches for the casurua itself mostly lead to this article. Ah well.

The casurua is… what’s the opposite of a glass cannon? A tank that shoots blanks, maybe? They have twenty-two Hit Dice (for comparison, great wyrm red dragons had 23 HD), AC 0, 75% magic resistance, are normally invisible, and basically can’t be killed unless you completely dismantle or unearth their gravesite and get a high-level cleric to bless the area—but only have four attacks that do 3d6 damage each. And that can be less, since they throw objects that are in the area instead of generating material themselves, which may mean they have to throw things that do less damage. At the level in which you even an AD&D character is fighting a 22 HD monster, I’m pretty sure 3d6 damage, even four times in a round, isn’t going to be a huge problem.

Let’s see if I can fix that.

1705688617587.png


Casurua
Too Evil To Die, Dragon Magazine 210
Creature by Tom Moldvay; art by Jim Holloway

When many people are massacred at once and their bodies hidden away in a mass grave, a casurua may rise. They invisibly haunt the location of their deaths, appearing only when that location is invaded. The casurua is less a creature and more a phenomena, an entity of fury and outrage that, being bound to its grave, focuses its wrath on anyone who comes near. The intruder’s intent doesn’t matter—someone seeking to lay them to rest is as hated as someone who hopes to rob the grave or is simply curious.

Casurua are, for the most part, invisible, although they can choose to manifest. When they do, they are a collection of balefully glowing eyes and skeletal hands, and with them comes a foul graveyard stench.

Mindless Rage. Casurua are tortured souls who know nothing but anger. It’s impossible to reason with them; any intelligence the individuals once had was all but extinguished when they were forcibly joined together as a single undead entity. They have no memories of their previous life, not even what or who killed them. Likewise, it’s impossible to control or direct a casurua; the sheer number of minds that make it up, no matter how dulled they are, are too focused on their singular purpose. The only thing the casurua wants is for its pain to go away.

Long Silences. If the place where a casurua’s bodies are buried is left alone for a long time, the casurua will go dormant. Even if that place is later occupied, it may take a long time for the entity to “awaken” again.

Climate/Terrain: any terrain; dungeon, ruin

Legends and Lore
With an Arcana or Religion check, the characters can learn the following:

DC 15. A casurua is a singular entity made of dozens or hundreds of souls that were murdered at once. Filled with rage from their death, they attack anyone who comes near.

DC 20. Almost mindless, a casurua can’t be put to rest except by unearthing its mass grave and reburying it elsewhere in consecrated ground.

Casurua Encounters
CR 11-16
1 casurua
Treasure: 800 gp, silver ewer (250 gp), 7 corals (100 gp each), small silver idol (250 gp), three masterwork longswords and shields with matching details; dragontooth necklace (250 gp); set of gold buttons on a rotting jacket (250 gp), potions of greater healing and heroism, ring of protection, wand of magic missile

Signs
1-2. The sound of moans and gibbering and stone being scraped or thrown against stone.
3. The sound of knocking and footsteps, moving towards a specific area.
4. A graveyard stench.
5. People who sleep nearby have dreams of mass slaughter.
6. Lights go out and shadows become darker

Casurua
Legendary huge undead
; Challenge 13 (10,000 XP)
AC
16 (natural armor)
HP 182 (28d12; bloodied 91)
Speed 0 ft., fly 20 ft.

STR 10 (+0) DEX 21 (+5) CON 10 (+0)
INT 4 (-3) WIS 16 (+3) CHA 23 (+6)

Proficiency +4; Maneuver DC 17
Saving Throws Str +4, Dex +9
Damage Resistances acid, fire, lightning, thunder; damage from nonmagical weapons
Damage Immunities cold, necrotic, poison
Condition Immunities charmed, fatigue, frightened, grappled, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, prone, restrained
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 13
Languages understands the languages it knew in life but can’t speak

Bound. The casurua can’t move more than 100 feet from its bodies.

Detect Life. The casurua magically senses the general direction of living creatures up to 1 mile away.

Incorporeal. The casurua can move through creatures and objects. It takes 5 (1d10) force damage if it ends its turn inside an object.

Invisible. The casurua is invisible unless it uses a bonus action to manifest.

Magic Resistance. The casurua has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Legendary Resistance (3/day). When the casurua fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead. When it does so, creatures have advantage on their saving throw against the next Throw attack it makes before the end of its next turn.

Turn Immunity. The casurua automatically succeeds saving throws against any affect that would turn undead.

Undead Nature. The casurua doesn’t require air, sustenance, or sleep.

Unquiet Spirit. If defeated in combat, the casurua returns in 1d4 months. It can be put to rest permanently only by dismantling or unearthing the mass grave that holds its bodies and putting the bodies to rest in a hallowed location.

Actions
Multiattack.
The casurua makes two attacks with its Claws or with Poltergeist Throw.

Claw. Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 16 (2d10+5) damage + 5 (1d10) psychic damage.

Poltergeist Throw. Ranged Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, range 60 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (3d6+5) bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage (whichever is most appropriate).

Hurl Objects (Recharge 4-6). The casurua throws rocks or other unattended objects that are within 10 feet of it in a 60-foot line that is 10 feet wide. Each creature in that area must make a DC 17 Dexterity saving, taking 36 (8d8) bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage (whichever is most appropriate) on a failed saving throw, or half as much damage on a successful one.

Horrifying Visage. Each non-undead creature within 60 feet that can see the casurua must make a DC 18 Wisdom saving throw. On a failure, it is frightened for 1 minute. While frightened by Horrifying Visage, a creature must take the Dash action and move away from the casurua by the safest route on each of its turns, unless there is nowhere to move. If the creature ends its turn in a location where it doesn’t have line of sight to the casurua, it may make a Wisdom saving throw. On a successful save, it is no longer frightened.

Reactions
Eyes of Doom.
When the casurua takes damage from an attack or spell, it uses Horrifying Visage.

Legendary Actions
The casurua can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. It regains spent legendary actins at the start of its turn.

Brick Up. The casurua creates a shield out of stones, branches, or other ground material. Until the start of its next turn, it has total cover and advantage on Dexterity saving throws.

Claw. The casurua uses its Claw attack.

Poltergeist Throw. The casurua uses its Poltergeist Throw

Combat
Casurua use minimal tactics and are incapable of retreating very far, since they can’t leave the spot to which they are bound. If bloodied, it turns invisible and returns to its gravesite.
 

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Faolyn

(she/her)
The next collection of monsters is from a Dragon’s Bestiary subtitled “spawn of the sewers,” and indeed, every creature within is designed to lurk beneath a city’s streets. Despite the claim made in an Order of the Stick comic, that sewers are anachronistic, they’ve actually been around a very long time. Babylonians had brick-lined sewers. The Romans had a goddess who ruled over Rome’s sewer system. Her name was Cloacina, which to me sounds like something a GM would come up with if they suddenly had to come up with a name and didn't have a list handy.

The first monster is called the necromantic sludge, a nasty fellow which creates its own zombies on which to ride around. This effectively makes it a two-part monster. D&D has Mythic monsters, but I don’t think that Level Up has something similar (yet), although I could have missed something. Anyway, this thing isn’t mythic-level, really.

I’ve very unsure about the CR for this creature. Let me know if you think I’m off with it.

1705941704739.png


Necromantic Sludge
Dragon’s Bestiary, Dragon Magazine 238
Creature by John Baichtal; art by Tom Baxa

The path to lichdom is a dangerous one, and many spellcasters fail to achieve it. Some of those casters who fail find that their bodies liquify into the dark red ooze known as the necromantic sludge. Although they lose most of their mind in the transformation, necromantic sludges typically feel compelled to remain near the places where they sought immortality, in the dungeons and sewers below their former homes.

Necromantic sludges feel an instinctual desire to collect magical tomes and books, even though they have no ability to actually use them. Such items are often completely degraded due to the foul conditions in which the sludge lives, but occasionally something of use can be found in their “hoard.”

Dangerous Threats. Unlike most oozes, their touch is harmless to metal, wood, leather, or, technically, flesh. Like the liches they would have become, they feed on life force; their touch drains vitality but it doesn’t disintegrate. Instead, those they feed on become little more than withered husks as the life is drained out of them. Worse yet, they can impart some of that stolen life into corpses, causing them to rise as vile, disease-bearing zombies.

Zombie-Riders. Necromantic liches have an unusual ability. When they find a corpse—usually one they’ve drained—they enter the body through its orifices and puppeteering it. Their new body turns a disturbing bruise-gray in color and can last for several months until it is finally too rotten to remain intact. Although this body resembles a zombie, it isn’t, causing many a cleric to waste resources on destroying them.

Semi-Eusocial. Necromantic oozes reproduce by budding when they’ve consumed enough life force, but each new bud is literally an offshoot of the original ooze—they all share a mind. They recognize their sibling-offspring as themselves and work with each other, for they are all the same thing. Although their intelligence doesn’t increase, their abstract thinking skills do, and they begin to lay traps, use tactics, and coordinate with one another when they attack—an impressive feat, since even in groups they lack language.

Climate/Terrain: any climate; dungeon, laboratory, ruin, sewer

Legends and Lore
With an Arcana check, the characters can learn the following:

DC 10. Necromantic sludges are oozes that can “ride” corpses, effectively giving themselves a zombie form.

DC 15. Magic tends to literally bounce off a necromantic sludge, endangering the original caster.

DC 20. These oozes are quite intelligent and social (for oozes) and can engage in rudimentary tactics.

Necromantic Sludge Encounters
CR 3-4
Necromantic sludge

CR 5-10 2-3 necromantic sludges and 1d4 zombies
Treasure: a tome with information leading to the discovery of a rare 2nd-level spell, spell scroll of false life

CR 11-16 2-3 necromantic sludges and zombie horde
Treasure: spell scrolls of ray of enfeeblement and spare the dying

Signs
1-2. A greater than usual number of zombies in the area.
3. Black, slimy handprints on the wall.
4. A withered corpse that’s covered in smears of black goo

Necromantic Sludge
Medium ooze
; Challenge 3 (700 XP)
AC
9
HP 30 (4d8+12; bloodied 15)
Speed 20 ft.

STR 14 (+2) DEX 9 (-1) CON 16 (+3)
INT 5 (-3) WIS 9 (-1) CHA 5 (-3)

Proficiency +2; Maneuver DC 10
Skills Perception +1
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical weapons
Damage Immunities necrotic
Condition Immunities blinded, charmed, deafened, fatigue, frightened, prone
Senses blindsight 120 ft. (blind beyond this radius), passive Perception 9
Languages

Amorphous (As Ooze Only). The sludge can pass through an opening as narrow as 1 inch wide without squeezing.

Animate. The sludge engulfs the body creature it has killed with its pseudopod attack within the last 10 minutes and animates it. While animated in this manner, the sludge is indistinguishable from a zombie, but is not undead. The sludge gains 30 temporary hit points and loses the Amorphous trait. When it runs out of temporary hit points, the zombie body is destroyed and the sludge resumes its true form.

Magic Resistance. The sludge has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Necrotic Absorption. If the sludge it hit by an attack that deals necrotic damage, it takes no damage and instead regains that number of hit points.

Spider Climb. The sludge can use its climb speed even on difficult surfaces and upside down on ceilings.

Actions
Multiattack.
When attached to a zombie, it makes two Slam attacks.

Pseudopod (As Ooze Only). Melee Weapon Attack: +4 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 9 (2d6+2) bludgeoning damage plus 7 (2d8) necrotic damage and must make a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned until the end of its next turn. Additionally, Its hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to the necrotic damage taken, and the sludge regains that number of hit points.

Slam (As Zombie Only). Melee Weapon Attack: +4 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (2d8+2) bludgeoning damage plus 7 (2d7) necrotic damage. Its hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to the necrotic damage taken, and the sludge regains that number of hit points.

Bonus Actions
Arise! (1/day).
The sludge touches the body of a corpse and causes it to rise as a zombie with the Vile Discharge trait. The zombie isn’t under the sludge’s control, but will not attack the sludge.

Reactions
Turn Spell.
If the sludge is targeted by a spell that targets only it, the spell instead targets the caster, using its original slot level, spell save DC, spell attack modifier, and spellcasting ability.

Attach. If the sludge is in its true form and ends its turn within 5 feet of a corpse, it uses Animate. It regains all lost hit points and gains 30 temporary hit points.

Combat
Necromantic sludges prefer to attack while animating a zombie, and does so recklessly, with little regard for its safety. It attacks creatures who venture into range and persues the closest creature. It retreats only if exposed to sunlight or it is seriously injured and there are no intact bodies around for it to animate.

Variant: Gestalt Necromantic Sludge
Sometimes, multiple necromantic sludges merge back together, forming a truly large sludge. The many different minds of the sludges also merge, creating a higher, and truly disturbing, form of intellect.

The gestalt necromantic sludge is CR 6 (2,300 XP). It is Large and has 102 (12d10+36; bloodied 51) hit points. Its Intelligence becomes 12 (+1). Its Arise! Bonus action becomes usable once per rest. It gains the following new trait:

Deathly Aura. A creature that starts its turn within 5 feet of the sludge must make a DC 14 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it takes 5 (1d10) necrotic damage. On a success, it is immune to this sludge’s Deathly Aura for 24 hours.

It also gains the following additional actions:

Multiattack. The sludge makes three pseudopod attacks.

Command. The sludge issues a mental command to any zombies it has created that are within 60 feet. It must issue the same command to all zombies.
 

The first monster is called the necromantic sludge, a nasty fellow which creates its own zombies on which to ride around. This effectively makes it a two-part monster. D&D has Mythic monsters, but I don’t think that Level Up has something similar (yet), although I could have missed something. Anyway, this thing isn’t mythic-level, really.
Elites are functionally a replacement to mythics from base dnd 5e (just swap out refilling the entire health bar with double the health from the get go, and gaining traits, abilities and the such on being bloodied rather then the mythic trait being active).
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
Elites are functionally a replacement to mythics from base dnd 5e (just swap out refilling the entire health bar with double the health from the get go, and gaining traits, abilities and the such on being bloodied rather then the mythic trait being active).
Yeah, but so far (unless I've missed something), all the elites are just variations of regular monsters. I haven't seen a monster start out as elite.
 

Yeah, but so far (unless I've missed something), all the elites are just variations of regular monsters. I haven't seen a monster start out as elite.
Tarrasque is elite and has no not-elite version (unless you count its base dnd 5e counterpart, but adventerer's guide and the a5e.tools site does not have the base 5e version so i don't count it).
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
Tarrasque is elite and has no not-elite version (unless you count its base dnd 5e counterpart, but adventerer's guide and the a5e.tools site does not have the base 5e version so i don't count it).
Hmm. I guess I missed that--the tarrasque has never been a favorite of mine so I didn't read the entry thoroughly. I'll remember that for next time!
 

Hmm. I guess I missed that--the tarrasque has never been a favorite of mine so I didn't read the entry thoroughly. I'll remember that for next time!
the bogey from paranormal power is also an elite (though annoyingly not labeled as such, but you can tell based on it having twice the normal experiance given then normal for its cr).
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
Another ooze! This one is designed specifically to target casters, as it drains the life out of them. The 2e version of the lich’s blood only goes after wizards, but there’s no reason for the Level Up version to be so picky. This’ll teach those squishy casters that there’s safety in numbers… as if PCs really needed another reason to always travel everywhere together.

This is another ooze whose final CR I’m unsure of. There are some things that just never get covered by the CR calculation. ;)

1706115195867.png


Lich’s Blood
Dragon’s Bestiary, Dragon Magazine 238
Creature by John Baichtal; art by Tom Baxa

Lich’s blood looks (and smells) like a pool of dark-red blood, but are actually a rare form of ooze. Moving like water throughout the dark places in which they dwell, lich’s blood seek out magic, especially spellcasters. They need magic as other creatures need food and water, and they drain the magic right out of the spellcasters they feed upon. Their victims nearly always die from this drain, as it drains life along with the magic.

Experiment Gone Awry. A necromancer whose identity has long been lost, experimented with a new method of gathering spells. The blood of an actual lich, animated by magic, would draw the spells out of the minds of unsuspecting spellcasters. It would then (theoretically) return, and the necromancer would be able to use the blood as ink and write the spells that it extracted. But the necromancer made a mistake—when he obtained the lich’s blood, he got some of the lich’s intellect and personality as well. Furious at being used in such a manner, the blood made the necromancer its first victim, then slithered away, and has been reproducing ever since.

Intelligent Oozes. Although they don’t look like much, lich’s bloods are actually quite intelligent. They are more than smart enough to only attack from ambush, and even then, they only attack people who are alone, as they have little ability to escape from harm.

Climate/Terrain: any climate; cavern, ruin, sewer

Legends and Lore
With an Arcana check, the characters can learn the following:

DC 10. Known as lich’s blood, these oozes adhere themselves to casters, suffocating them while also draining the magic right out of them.

DC 15. Their liquid body makes them all but immune to physical damage, but they are weak against fire and acid.

DC 20. The lich’s blood is immune to spells except for magic from the negation school; these spells can wound or even kill it.

Lich’s Blood Encounters
CR 3-4
1 lich’s blood

Signs
1. With a DC 13 Perception or Survival check, a faint trail of reddish slime
2. The withered corpse of a humanoid who was obviously a spellcaster in life
3. The smell of blood in the air
4. A moisture-damaged magical scroll; it requires a DC 25 Arcana check to decipher it before it can be used

Lich’s Blood
Legendary Medium ooze
; Challenge 4 (1,100 XP)
AC
10 (natural armor)
HP 60 (8d8+12; bloodied 30)
Speed 10 ft., climb 10 ft.

STR 12 (+1) DEX 6 (-2) CON 16 (+3)
INT 14 (+2) WIS 12 (+1) CHA 13 (+1)

Proficiency +2; Maneuver DC 11
Damage Resistances damage from nonmagical weapons
Damage Vulnerabilities acid, fire
Condition Immunities blinded, charmed, deafened, fatigue, frightened, prone
Senses blindsight 60 ft. (blind beyond this radius), passive Perception 11
Languages

Amorphous. The lich’s blood can pass through an opening as narrow as 1 inch wide without squeezing.

Detect Magic. The lich’s blood can detect the presence of magic items, spells, and spellcasters within 120 feet of it.

False Appearance. While motionless, the ooze in indistinguishable from a pool of blood.

Legendary Resistance (3/Day). If the lich's blood fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead. When it does so, some of its body hardens and flakes away, and it can't use its Limited Magic Immunity until the end of its next turn.

Limited Magic Immunity. The lich’s blood can’t be affected by spells except for spells from the negation school. If targeted by a spell from that school, it takes 5 (1d10) force damage per slot level with which the spell was cast.

Spider Climb. The lich’s blood can use its climb speed even on difficult surfaces and upside down on ceilings.

Actions
Pseudopod.
Melee Weapon Attack: +3 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 7 (2d6) necrotic damage, and the lich’s blood regains that many hit points.

Smothering Drain. The lich’s blood touches a creature within 5 feet of it, attaching itself to that creature. If the creature is a spellcaster, it must make a DC 13 or become blinded and can’t breathe or speak as the ooze covers its mouth and nose, and is at risk of suffocation. When the lich’s blood is dealt damage, it takes half the damage (rounded down) and the creature it is smothering takes the other half.

At the start of each of lich’s blood’s turns, the creature must make a new saving throw. On a failure, it loses its highest-level spell slot and takes 3 (1d6) necrotic damage per level of the spell slot.

The lich’s blood can detach itself as a bonus action.

Bonus Actions
Split.
Each time the lich’s blood drains two or more spell slots of 6th level or higher, it buds off a new lich’s blood. This new blood is Small and has half the original’s hit points.

Legendary Actions
The lich's blood can take 2 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. It regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Pseudopod. The lich makes a pseudopod attack.

Burst of Magic (Costs 2 Actions). The lich's blood channels some of its stolen magic into a burst of magical energy. Each creature within 10 feet must make a DC 13 Constitution saving throw, taking 5 (1d10) force damage and 5 (1d10) psychic damage on a failed save, or half as much on a successful one.

Combat
Lich’s bloods typically attack by clinging to the ceiling and dropping down on magic-using passers-by. They only attack individuals, as they are aware of their physical limitations.

Variant: Lich's Ichor
As the lich's blood ages and grows in size, the power of its meals increases as well. It absorbs more and more magic, and eventually develop the ability to channel it in limited ways.

The lich's ichor is an elite monster, equivalent to two CR 4 monsters (2,200 XP). It has Intelligence 16 (+3), its AC is 13 (with mage armor), it is Large, has 120 (16d8+48; bloodied 60) hit points, and it can make two Pseudopod attacks each round. It has the following additional trait:

Elite Recovery. At the end of each of its turns while bloodied, the lich's ichor ends one negative effect currently affecting it. It can do so as long as it has at least 1 hit point, even while unconscious or incapacitated.

Innate Spellcasting. The lich's blood's spellcasting trait is Intelligence (spell save DC 13). It can cast the following spells, requiring no components:
3/day each: dimension door, mage armor, magic missile
1/day: counterspell

The lich's ichor can take 3 legendary actions each round, and has the following new legendary action, which it can use only while bloodied:

Summon Blood Spawn (Costs 2 Actions). The lich's ichor creates a blood spawn out of its own body. This blood spawn has the statistics of a mephit (type chosen randomly by the Narrator) and acts on the lich's ichor's turns, obeying the lich's blood's mental orders (no action required by it). It remains for 1 minute or until the lich's blood dies, at which point it dissolves into a clump of bloody ooze. The lich’s ichor can use its action to use the blood spawn’s senses as its own, but is blinded to its own surroundings while doing so.
 


Faolyn

(she/her)
I'm curious on how you decide the CR of the creatures from 2nd edition
I actually build the monsters in reverse from what the book tells me to. First, I figure out the monster's Hit Dice, which I usually alter based on a couple of things, such as how they compare to 2e monsters of similar HD that have been updated for 5e/LU. Like, a 5e ogre had 4+1 HD, and those were d8s, while an LU ogre has 7d10 HD, plus a major Con bonus. Then I alter it depending on what I feel that monster's role is going to be in an encounter.

I may end up altering that CR, and with it the HD, depending on the type of attacks the 2e version had, because they often don't match to the amount of damage they "should" do in LU. So if I need the monster to do more damage, I'll up the CR and HD accordingly. And after all of that, if the resulting monster has really powerful special abilities that aren't really covered by the monster-making rules, I'll up the CR another point without altering the HD. Like, there's nothing in the rules about draining magic out of a person or being basically immune to magic, so I took what should be a CR 3 monster and made it CR 4.
 

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