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D&D 5E Can you use misty step to arrest a fall?


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overgeeked

B/X Known World
For example, on your turn you use movement to jump off of a 50 foot cliff. Then after you have dropped 20 feet you use misty step to misty step to the ground and land without taking any falling damage.

Would you allow this?
Yes to the action, no to the bolded part. You'd still have the same momentum. You'd need to "spend" that somehow. As written above, you'd reduce the falling damage from 50ft worth to 20ft worth. Have the misty step spit you out going up from the ground and you'd still have momentum carrying you up into the air...only to fall back down. Again, you'd reduce the falling damage but not negate it.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
You can use a bonus action any time on your turn, so as long as you use it before you run out of movement, it's unambiguously yes. Any other scenario ranges from probably not RAW to definitely not RAW, but I'd still broadly allow it. Spending spell slots outside of combat, for things unrelated to combat, is good for the game, IMO.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
So, I don't think that Misty Step can be assumed to maintain the teleporting creature's inertia, but even if it does I'd let the caster make a check to reverse the trajectory of their momentum so they're just doing a very impressive jump!

I have let Dimension Door and some other teleportations allow someone to cannonball into an enemy, or portal gun around some obstacle that they didn't have the range to directly teleport past or needed to see in order to teleport there safely, etc.
 

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
The rulings under both 3e and 4e rules was that momentum is conserved when teleporting - specifically that if a stone is thrown or arrow is shot through a portal it comes out still flying through the air and can hit a target. Equally a falling person affected by misty step is still falling after they teleport

the only question is how far they are deemed to have fallen
 








I recall in 3.5 making a psychic who could teleport a short distance as a swift action (or was it called a minor action then?), which my GM let me use once to stand up and avoid an AoO. How? Well, if you fell, you could make a Tumble check to land on your feet and negate falling damage, so I went from prone on the ground, teleported 10 feet up, made my check, and landed on my feet.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I like @doctorbadwolf 's position where the caster decides if momentum is conserved or not. I would also say that since this is essentially using a 2nd level spell slot for a worse featherfall (since it only effects you), then I don't mind increasing the utility of Misty Step in this way.
Exactly. In my group, the number one rule is "don't let rules hold back the game".
 

ardoughter

Hero
Supporter
if momentum is not conserved, teleportation spells would be lethal, as we are currently moving at VERY high speed around the sun etc.
And if momentum is conserved then a teleportation linear accelerator planet killer system is also possible.
I would allow the OP maneuver because it is cool. Don't allow it if you want but leave real world physics out of it. That way leads math, madness and corner cases.
D&D magic is not compatible with real world physics.
 

jgsugden

Legend
This falls into a zone where madness lies. Option 1: 5d6 damage (full fall). Option 2: 2d6 damage (20 foot fall). Option 3: 0 damage (no fall). If you try to figure out which is right, you have to start applying "physics" to magic, and that is inherently going to result in contradictions, disagreements and frustration. Accordingly, I usually avoid this by turning to the dice.

Tim: "I jump off the cliff, and once I fall 20 feet I Misty Step to the ground. Will I take damage from that? If so, how much?"
DM: "You're normally going to take 2d6 from the 20 feet of falling, but you could try to adjust the Misty Step spell as you cast it to arrest the momentum. If you get it right, you'll take no damage. If it is a little wrong you'll still take 2d6. If you botch it, you may end up taking 5d6. It is a pretty hard trick to pull off. It would be an Arcana roll."
Tim: "I'll go for it. Ouch. Natural one for a 7."
DM: "You're timing is off and you smash into the ground full force, taking the full 5d6 for ...14 damage."

... or ...

Tim: "I'll go for it. Nat 20 for a 26!"
DM: "You time it perfectly and manage to arrest your momentum as part of the spell. You hit the ground on your feet. You can do a Black WIdow or Iron Man Super hero landing if you'd like."
Tim: "Widow. I'm a poser, eh?"
 
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