D&D 5E Cantrip nerf (house rule brainstorm)


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OK. So which martial classes do you feel overshadow primary casters in the three pillars of the game, and what are their abilities that allow them to do so?

At most levels, they overshadow primary casters in single-target damage, especially over more than maybe 3 rounds, and the abilities that allow them to do so are Action Surge, Sneak Attack, Extra Attack, Hunter's Mark, Reckless Attack, etc. And, of course, it's not just theoretical white-room damage. It's often the case that, due to the lower damage ceiling, your biggest damage spells are simply not worth the resource expenditure. Better save that 5th-level slot and just cast Toll the Dead instead.
 

Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
So it's pointless book-keeping for no functional change? As I said, either you're nerfing the casters hard, or you're making the resource plentiful enough that there is no meaningful difference between what you did and just making cantrips at-will other than needing to do more book-keeping in combat. If the cleric can still use his 2d8+4 cantrip instead of his 1d8+2 crossbow whenever he casts Healing Word, why bother with the book-keeping at all?
Unless you think quicken spell is so plentiful that keeping track of it is pointless book-keeping, your reply is an exaggeration with no merit.
 


jgsugden

Legend
...
Situationally, if Mold Earth and Mending etc are infinitely spammable, they put whole occupations out of work. Moving a 5ft cube of earth 5 feet every 6 seconds (or whatever time a round represents these days) basically makes shovels obsolete, Prestidigitation does the same for pretty much any cleaning task, and Mending means that stuff absolutely never need wear out or remain broken, and the implications of THAT on the economics of people trying to make a living from (for instance) tailoring or shoemaking or damn near any form of craftsmanship are pretty obvious.
You're a farmer. You have 2 kids. One is super smart and one is super strong.

The strong one you can put to work on the farm with little to no training. Instant gratification.

The smart one - maybe you can send him to a wizard to learn magic. How much would that cost? Do you think the wizard wants to do it for free? Do you think the boy can earn his keep - can he do anything that an unseen servant or a few cantrips can't do much better? No, you're going to have to pay that wizard to train the boy, and that would be years of education, as well as hundreds of gold pieces for a spellbook with 6 spells. At a GP a day (a steal), that boy's education and resources would cost thousands of gold! By the time he was educated and free to return, the strong kid would have done years of work. Then, the wizard would have the choice to stay and work on the farm, or go off and make more money elsewhere... I hope you raised that kid to be loyal to his family before you sent him off for years.

People that can cast cantrips have better things to do than use them for profit. You might run into the occasional wizard willing to cast mending to supplement his income, but that would be rare.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
...You're a farmer. You have 2 kids. One is super smart and one is super strong.

The strong one you can put to work on the farm with little to no training. Instant gratification.

The smart one - maybe you can send him to a wizard to learn magic. How much would that cost? Do you think the wizard wants to do it for free? Do you think the boy can earn his keep - can he do anything that an unseen servant or a few cantrips can't do much better? No, you're going to have to pay that wizard to train the boy, and that would be years of education, as well as hundreds of gold pieces for a spellbook with 6 spells. At a GP a day (a steal), that boy's education and resources would cost thousands of gold! By the time he was educated and free to return, the strong kid would have done years of work. Then, the wizard would have the choice to stay and work on the farm, or go off and make more money elsewhere... I hope you raised that kid to be loyal to his family before you sent him off for years.

People that can cast cantrips have better things to do than use them for profit. You might run into the occasional wizard willing to cast mending to supplement his income, but that would be rare.
This assumes that you have to become a full wizard to cast cantrips, just for a start at the issues here.

Next, the ruling class will pay for the education of anyone with the talent to gain those powers, or a guild will form. Possibly both.

Because mold earth is a huge game changer. No way it ever becomes ubiquitous enough to “replace shovels” unless the ability to learn to cast spells is basically “anyone can learn at least basic magic”, in which case you get a world like that of the Dark Sword series, where people who can’t cast spells are second class, and we are talking a whole different kind of world from most D&D worlds.

However, a few such people per petty kingdom still wildly changes the world. Mold Earth allows easy irrigation, fortification, foundational building, etc. Its pretty gnarly.
 

At most levels, they overshadow primary casters in single-target damage, especially over more than maybe 3 rounds, and the abilities that allow them to do so are Action Surge, Sneak Attack, Extra Attack, Hunter's Mark, Reckless Attack, etc. And, of course, it's not just theoretical white-room damage. It's often the case that, due to the lower damage ceiling, your biggest damage spells are simply not worth the resource expenditure. Better save that 5th-level slot and just cast Toll the Dead instead.
OK, so you think it is just single target damage where martials overshadow casters?
Do you believe that this is a problem in the game overall, and where do you think the balance lies between casters and martials for the other aspects of the game such as discovery, travel, social interaction, area damage, inflicting conditions etc?
 

Not the same guy but: paladins.

Exploration: spells (quite a few handy divinations on the paladin list) and a mount, which adds an extra perception roll. The high save mods make them good at dealing with hazards, by pushing through them.

Social: high charisma usually coupled with good social standing. Paladins are champions of good and everyone knows it. Jives well with the more prestigious backgrounds like noble, soldier, and acolyte.

Combat: Divine Smite and Aura of Protection.

Not so hot at ranged encounters or dealing positively with the underworld, but it's fun to let other people shine sometimes.

Incidentally, also immune to cantrip nerfing.

I'm a little confused. You're defining the paladin as a martial, in the context of a martials vs casters question, but almost every point you bought up relates to the paladin's spells, spellcasting ability etc.
 

the_redbeard

Explorer
A couple of years ago (was it that long? damn) I ran a campaign that limited cantrips. I'm restarting one soon (had a session zero this past week). It lasted 10 session before my work schedule killed it. While there were some players who decided that the campaign was not for them, all of the players that started the campaign wanted to continue. The limitation was a consideration for the spell casters - every cantrip cast was a bit of a choice.

I run a very different game than standard 5e and I was completely fine with some potential players deciding this is not for them. But the game context for limiting cantrips was:
1. No experience from combat
2. Experience is from gold recovered and spent on non-advancement (carousing, philanthropy,bling,etc)
3. Encumbrance is simplified but strictly enforced (you need to be able to carry out that loot)
4. 1st Short rest lasted 10 min. The 2nd, 30 min. The 3rd (and final), 1 hour. (Rests also consumed food and water - back to that encumbrance issue).
5. Random encounter/hazard rolls every 10 minutes. (A random encounter only occurs on a 1 in 6, but other die rolls use up resources, environmental changes can occur, etc.)

The world itself was relatively low magic. Non-classed NPCs had access to rituals that were the main source of magical power mainly through saints, relics, etc.

Non-combat challenges and creative solutions to avoid combat were much more the focus. So it wasn't the damage cantrips that were the problem, but the utility cantrips that trivialized some challenges. And I'm OK with magic trivializing a challenge - that's what magic is for. But it should cost a resource; just like a non-magic solution may likely cost equipment, magic should be a resource that requires a thoughtful choice before it is expended.

I care more about niche protection than I do about balance. In a problem solving game that is less about your character sheet but your contribution to solving the problem the party is facing balance is less of an issue.

So here were my cantrip house rules:
CHANGES TO CANTRIPS
LIMITED AND UNLIMITED CANTRIPS
  • In general cantrips are no longer unlimited.
  • A spell caster now has Cantrip “slots” equal to their Proficiency Modifier plus their Spellcasting Attribute modifier. These are refreshed on a short rest.
  • A spell caster can exchange a 1st level spell slot for their proficiency modifier (only) in Cantrip slots.
* Some spell casters (warlocks) may choose 1 unlimited cantrip that they can cast unlimited
times. They may only switch this choice of cantrip when they gain a level.
* Wizards may record cantrips in their spell books and switch out their prepared cantrips
during their Arcane Study.
* Any spell caster may substitute an Ability Score Increase to declare one of their cantrips
unlimited. A spell caster could forgo their initial increase to their spell casting attribute to
begin play with an unlimited cantrip.
* Unlimited cantrips can only be switched when the character gains a level.
CONCENTRATION
The following cantrips have concentration added to their
duration:
Light
Mage Hand
Message
Minor Illusion
These cantrips already required concentration:
Dancing Lights
Friends
Resistance
True Strike
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
I'm a little confused. You're defining the paladin as a martial, in the context of a martials vs casters question, but almost every point you bought up relates to the paladin's spells, spellcasting ability etc.
I think that you are looking at it the wrong way, but first it is at will and single target. The spread alone is not the problem so much as something that illustrates the problem's scale.
Monster design, non damage spell design and so on are all largely pegged to the faulty white room idea where A: martial will never have "magic" weapons & B: the dmg249(?) estimated number of targets per aoe are both present and politely lined up for optimal targeting. A & B combined causes severe problems due to how easy and strongly recommended by wotc it is to invalidate A early & often with any form of inexpensive "magic" weapon. Once A is invalidated all of the non damage spells (buff debuff control etc) are now wrongly timed to a gigantic degree and there is really no way of correcting that. Adding insult to injury wotc has setup a situation were "obviously there must be reasons because lfqw would be bad" is both implied and frequently accepted common knowledge so even bringing up the idea of correcting the dial on the other spells design elements comes off skin to angel summoner demanding bmx biker unlock his full angel summoning powers thanks to wotc providing no easy solution to correct things after taking their own advice to be "generous" with magic weapons.
 

OK, so you think it is just single target damage where martials overshadow casters?
Do you believe that this is a problem in the game overall, and where do you think the balance lies between casters and martials for the other aspects of the game such as discovery, travel, social interaction, area damage, inflicting conditions etc?

Why are you talking to me as though I said casters are underpowered and need to be buffed? I said casters aren't overpowered and don't need to be nerfed. Those aren't equivalent.
 

I think that you are looking at it the wrong way, but first it is at will and single target. The spread alone is not the problem so much as something that illustrates the problem's scale.
That quote is from a discussion about general power, not just at-will and single-target damage.

But while we're on the subject, do you think spellcasters should have equal single-target at-will damage to martial classes, and if not, what sort of ratio feels right to you?

Monster design, non damage spell design and so on are all largely pegged to the faulty white room idea where A: martial will never have "magic" weapons & B: the dmg249(?) estimated number of targets per aoe are both present and politely lined up for optimal targeting.
Do you have a link for the source of this please? I'm interested in this as well, and I'd like to see WotC's official figures for evaluating magic and non-magic damage myself.

A & B combined causes severe problems due to how easy and strongly recommended by wotc it is to invalidate A early & often with any form of inexpensive "magic" weapon.
Yeah. Resistance or immunity to magic weapons usually reduces damage potential of martials considerably, but doesn't usually negate it. Its quite rare that a character has a magic version of the optimal weapon for them, but they often have a magic something by the time they regularly run into resistant opposition. (I have fond memories of my artificer being the MVP of most of a Curse of Strahd campaign simply by providing the right kind of magic weapons when needed.)

Although to add insult to earlier insult, many of the spellcasters that step on the roles of the martial classes in high, sustained single target damage automatically get magic damage as part of their kit. (Warlocks (both bolt and blade), moon druids.)
Once A is invalidated all of the non damage spells (buff debuff control etc) are now wrongly timed to a gigantic degree and there is really no way of correcting that. Adding insult to injury wotc has setup a situation were "obviously there must be reasons because lfqw would be bad" is both implied and frequently accepted common knowledge so even bringing up the idea of correcting the dial on the other spells design elements comes off skin to angel summoner demanding bmx biker unlock his full angel summoning powers thanks to wotc providing no easy solution to correct things after taking their own advice to be "generous" with magic weapons.
Do you feel that LFQW is not bad?
Or that spellcasters are currently underpowered compare to pure martials in D&D as a whole?

What would be required to "correct the dial on the other spell design elements"?
I'm not sure what the next bit means. Are you saying that its like the casters saying the martials have to become become casters themselves?
Why are you talking to me as though I said casters are underpowered and need to be buffed? I said casters aren't overpowered and don't need to be nerfed. Those aren't equivalent.
You said that in many cases the power ceiling was lower for spellcasters than it was for martial classes.
That isn't saying that casters need a buff, but it does seem to be saying that casters are generally less powerful than martials.
That isn't a common sentiment, so I was curious, and asked for more details.
 

I'm a little confused. You're defining the paladin as a martial, in the context of a martials vs casters question, but almost every point you bought up relates to the paladin's spells, spellcasting ability etc.
You asked what martials can outpace primary casters. I don't think anyone would describe paladins as primary casters.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
This assumes that you have to become a full wizard to cast cantrips, just for a start at the issues here.

Next, the ruling class will pay for the education of anyone with the talent to gain those powers, or a guild will form. Possibly both.

Because mold earth is a huge game changer. No way it ever becomes ubiquitous enough to “replace shovels” unless the ability to learn to cast spells is basically “anyone can learn at least basic magic”, in which case you get a world like that of the Dark Sword series, where people who can’t cast spells are second class, and we are talking a whole different kind of world from most D&D worlds.

However, a few such people per petty kingdom still wildly changes the world. Mold Earth allows easy irrigation, fortification, foundational building, etc. Its pretty gnarly.
I think that can be easily avoided by the suggestion that casting a cantrip is as about as much work as swinging a sword.

Can you you cast it a few dozen times to do a lot of work quickly? sure! But then you're getting mentally exhausted. So mold earth is great for a quick burst of work, but over the course of a day the wizard isn't going to be much more productive than a small crew with shovels. By applying this logic to cantrips, you enable in game use but avoid world building problems - because I 100% agree with you that if you can mold earth all day long, it's a world-building game changer.

I'm also wondering what % of "wizards" in a world are people with the magic adept feat. If you take find familiar, prestidigitation and one other spells (firebolt?), to most people... you're a wizard! (same with priests really)
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I think that can be easily avoided by the suggestion that casting a cantrip is as about as much work as swinging a sword.

Can you you cast it a few dozen times to do a lot of work quickly? sure! But then you're getting mentally exhausted. So mold earth is great for a quick burst of work, but over the course of a day the wizard isn't going to be much more productive than a small crew with shovels. By applying this logic to cantrips, you enable in game use but avoid world building problems - because I 100% agree with you that if you can mold earth all day long, it's a world-building game changer.

I'm also wondering what % of "wizards" in a world are people with the magic adept feat. If you take find familiar, prestidigitation and one other spells (firebolt?), to most people... you're a wizard! (same with priests really)
I agree, I think most wizards have a few spells and some rituals. I do assume better irrigation and plumbing and hygiene in my D&D world than we have in pre-modern Earth, due to a variety of low level spells, but I’m not gonna assume magic is so common that commoners don’t need better weapons to overcome better armor or that walls can’t keep most armies out, eventually leading to guns. No, most D&D world just don’t have guns yet, IMO.

But mold earth does still allow a Wizard to do the work of a small crew of people, per day, which makes wizardry a very valuable craft.
 

You said that in many cases the power ceiling was lower for spellcasters than it was for martial classes.
That isn't saying that casters need a buff, but it does seem to be saying that casters are generally less powerful than martials.
That isn't a common sentiment, so I was curious, and asked for more details.

Fair enough. If I were to be more thorough, I would say there are likewise many cases where it's higher than martials, particularly when there are large numbers of enemies. But even then, their power ceiling is lower than it used to be. This is fairly important because the old paradigm of the wizard largely twiddling of his thumbs, waiting for the right time to drop a nuke, is no longer in play, due to the nukes themselves being gone. A 6th-level AD&D wizard with nothing but Magic Missile, Melf's Acid Arrow, and Lightning Bolt prepared has, relative to monster HP values, far more power at his fingertips than a 5e wizard, so it's okay for him to twiddle his thumbs (or ineffectively sling stones) while the Fighter and the Cleric do all the face-smashing. A 5E wizard's spells aren't powerful enough to justify rounds of relative inaction. Meaningfully nerfing cantrips means, absent concomitant buffs to spells, knocking the wizard's total power back to well below what it was in the good old days we're citing as necessitating the nerf in the first place. Not meaningfully nerfing them means you're adding book-keeping just for the joy of it.
 

I think that can be easily avoided by the suggestion that casting a cantrip is as about as much work as swinging a sword.

Can you you cast it a few dozen times to do a lot of work quickly? sure! But then you're getting mentally exhausted. So mold earth is great for a quick burst of work, but over the course of a day the wizard isn't going to be much more productive than a small crew with shovels. By applying this logic to cantrips, you enable in game use but avoid world building problems - because I 100% agree with you that if you can mold earth all day long, it's a world-building game changer.

I'm also wondering what % of "wizards" in a world are people with the magic adept feat. If you take find familiar, prestidigitation and one other spells (firebolt?), to most people... you're a wizard! (same with priests really)

Yeah, by the same logic, if Mold Earth could be used to change the world, then the Fighter's ability to swing his axe twice every six seconds should radically change the lumber industry.
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
AThat quote is from a discussion about general power, not just at-will and single-target damage.

BBut while we're on the subject, do you think spellcasters should have equal single-target at-will damage to martial classes, Cand if not, what sort of ratio feels right to you?


DDo you have a link for the source of this please? I'm interested in this as well, and I'd like to see WotC's official figures for evaluating magic and non-magic damage myself.


Yeah. Resistance or immunity to magic weapons usually reduces damage potential of martials considerably, but doesn't usually negate it. EIts quite rare that a character has a magic version of the optimal weapon for them, but they often have a magic something by the time they regularly run into resistant opposition. (I have fond memories of my artificer being the MVP of most of a Curse of Strahd campaign simply by providing the right kind of magic weapons when needed.)

FAlthough to add insult to earlier insult, many of the spellcasters that step on the roles of the martial classes in high, sustained single target damage automatically get magic damage as part of their kit. (Warlocks (both bolt and blade), moon druids.)

GDo you feel that LFQW is not bad?
HOr that spellcasters are currently underpowered compare to pure martials in D&D as a whole?

IWhat would be required to "correct the dial on the other spell design elements"?
JI'm not sure what the next bit means. Are you saying that its like the casters saying the martials have to become become casters themselves?

You said that in many cases the power ceiling was lower for spellcasters than it was for martial classes.
That isn't saying that casters need a buff, but it does seem to be saying that casters are generally less powerful than martials.
That isn't a common sentiment, so I was curious, and asked for more details.
Lots to answer so I'm going to add some A B C type stuff to your post in hopes of keeping it simple & avoiding confusion
  • A it absolutely was yes. However it would be absurd to suggest that at will damage single target damage & resource consuming spike damage are not things that must be taken into account as part of "general power" as it related to a class.
  • B Don't care at all. That would be like taking a cargo van loaded with tools equipment & supplies, a terex, and a sportscar to the track expecting them to all get the same times on a drag race.
  • CThe "ratio" is a crunchable number that can be used when looking at the other stuff class brings to the table to decide if the sum total of other stuff justifies the damage. Using the track examples:
    • The sportscar gets awful gas mileage with great pickup & top speed. AIso it doesn't even have a trunk or back seat so has very little cargo capacity. All of those are things relevant to anyone needing a car & remain relevant to some degree most times they use it.
    • The cargo van gets similar but not good gas mileage as the sports car, has tons of cargo capacity, & has mediocre pickup & ok top speed . Like the sportscar all of those are things relevant to anyone needing a car & remain relevant to some degree most times they use it.
    • You've probably never seen or even heard of a terex, I once saw one loaded with a beached whale (like the whole whale & not one of those little whales). It gets something like 5 gallons per mile for gas mileage (not a typo, as in 0.2mpg). Finally it almost certainly a pickup & top speed less than an elderly mall walker. None of those are relevant useful or desired by most drivers
  • Getting back to the ratio.... Damage is one of those things like pickup top speed & mileage that is going to be of significant value in the vast majority of sessions & more is almost always going to be better. How much one is likely to be able to carry might come up, but not often & there is going to quickly be a point of diminishing returns where the value of raising carrying capacity is close to zero if not zero. Everything the terex can do is useful to someone and it all comes with significant downsides, but if applied to character classes casters have a lot of these kinds of things. You could also look at mmo's for another example, nobody really cares if the healer or crowd controller does much if any damage because the value of keeping everyone standing & doing crowd control is huge while a character that focuses more on buffing & debuffing needs to bring a little more to the table cause it's not so simple. The damage combined with the meaningful relevant bits of a class toolbox needs to combine into some meaningful level of worth but if at will+spike damage are bad to generally unimpressive the value of everything else(lets call it their toolbox) needs to reliably be huge in the vast majority of sessions.

    A barbarian can include things like their carrying capacity in their toolbox & a fighter can include the ability to choose from multiple weapons that are largely mechanically identical in their toolbox but none of those things are all that useful in the vast majority of sessions so should have very little if any weight in holding their class design back in areas the class cares about. Relentless rage comes for a barbarian at level 11 so shouldn't have much impact on levels 1-10 even if it is a great ability that has significant weight from level 11 on. Also at level 11 quite a few casters can cast true seeing, it's useful... occasionally... if you stop to prepare it but unlike relentless rage that spell is going to very rarely provide any sort of meaningful contribution at the table so it should have very little if any weight on the rest of the class. There is no easy answer and some reasonable amount of subjectivity is always going to be needed.

  • D: This is where the subjectivity I talked about in C is important but I've provided a few in this very thread. Back on page1(here) I talked about how cantrip damage tacks up against weapon damage & in that post included a link to detailed mathy stuff including the spreadsheet. Back on page5(here) I provided 4 different datapoints from 3 different wotc sources (dmg xge & alpg) showing strong evidence for why the faulty whiteroom of no magic weapons being available should have little if any merit worth even considering due to how wotc strongly ties to push making magic weapons "generously" available and even provides a rather low bar to purchasing them(one set of platemail costs about the same as enough magic weapons for most of the average group so not a high bar at all). That page 5 post also includes an example of the sort of asymmetrical monster design in the form of a monster's resist/immune lines alongside an uncommon ~100-500gp +1 wand & +1 weapon where every single energy resist listed will always remain relevant while the resistant to nonmagical B/P/S is completely ignored. I could add to that magic resistance & magic resistance alongside all of the weights already stacked up in this point alone. The damage disparity certainly doesn't justify al of these weights and the nondamage buff/debuff/control/etc spells tend to be written in ways that feel held back as if they need to compensate for LFQW even though it doesn't exist in 5e
  • E: The nonoptimal magic weapon choice is less of a factor than people make it out to be. If you looked at the post I mentioned in D & the data in it you would have seen than a shield and dagger fighter stacks up well against a d12 cantrip & only even falls behind if their +prime stat is falling behind the generally expected. Mind you that I'm not talking about an artifact or even a +1 dagger, it was literally the useless dagger included in some starting packages in the hands of a fighter with no extra coming from fighting styles feats or what have you beyond extra attack. The damage disparity is extreme well past what could be called an "almost unbelievable degree." Those crazy illusionist bracers from GGTR everyone thought crazy OP bring firebolt about even with a longsword & shield in the hands of that same fighter as another example... "bob needs a glaive or longsword instead of his preferred greataxe" is still extremely far ahead of cantrips
  • F: as serious as it seems, D should not be ignored & it largely dismisses this whole CoS thing. It goes one step further though because after you leave ravenloft & get magic weapons or even vsit castle ravenloft & get magic weapons that artificer & every other caster is still largely pegged against conditions that are unlikely to ever return.
  • G: LFQW is absolutely bad yes QFLW is worse. When so many aspects of casters beyond damage is individually trying to make sure it alone is the shield defending against rampant unchecked LFQW through various means including a wide array of spells that deliberately & obviously miss the mark to jut be almost good or worse. Introducing some level of LFQW with a small dial shift under those conditions is more fixing a problem of bad weighting against a whiteroom D clearly shows should never have been used than introducing a problem
  • H: Casters are fine as long as both martials & casters are in that same whiteroom with nonmagical weapons, but D details how flimsy & not at all recommended that the whiteroom itself is & there is no easy solution for towing casters out of that whiteroom once martials get n uncommon magic weapon with a 100-500gp msrp when wotc suggests the gm "be generous with magic weapons"
  • I In a lot of cases spells are held back with petty red tape & strings, overleveled for the effect, needlessly saddled with short duration limited targets with no way of shifting targets and concentration then topped off by granting a free save to end every round to targets that are only affected because they failed the initial save to ignore. Unfortunately it is as much of a mess to fix because it would take both rewriting a huge percentage of the spells and doing testing/sanity checking to avoid true LFQW/punpun type "oops". The problem is entirely wotc's deliberate creation & there is no easy solution one could charitably say was just "significant houserules"
  • J I think this is directed at another poster & have no idea what your asking about if not.
 
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auburn2

Adventurer
If we are going to get rid of spam cantrips, we should get rid of spam sneak attack too. How about sneak attack once per battle or maybe 3 times per short rest? Then we should also put limits on combat feats like sharpshooter, GWM, sentinel, CBE, mobile ..... have them also function twice per short rest.

That should balance out pretty well.
 

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