5E Critical Role: Amazon Orders 2 Seasons Of The Legend Of Vox Machina

Amazon has ordered two seasons of the Critical Role animated show, The Legend of Vox Machina! This is the show that was Kickstarted for about $10M last year.

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Originally, 10 episodes were planned from the massive Kickstarter. Amazon has ordered 14 more, to make 24 total, aimed at late 2020.

Amazon owns Twitch, on which Critical Role made its name.

Kickstarter backers will still get the first look at the show, and will be able to access the first season for free.




Here's CR's own announcement:

Hello, bees!

We slyly hinted towards sharing some really big news and today is the big day!

Our friends at Amazon have partnered with us to broadcast Critical Role: The Legend of Vox Machinaexclusively on Amazon Prime Video! And that’s not all… This partnership has allowed us to create TWO ENTIRE SEASONS and an additional TWO episodes per season. That’s a total of 24 episodes of animated Vox Machina goodness that we cannot wait to share with you.

What’s more, Amazon is throwing their support behind the show, allowing us to improve on the quality of the animation, the score, the special effects – you name it. And with 24 episodes to play with, instead of just 10, we’ll not only complete the entire Briarwood storyline in the animated series, but we’ll forge ahead into other classic Vox Machina story arcs as well!

Our lovely Kickstarter backers (hey, that’s YOU!) will still have an opportunity to watch the two-part special that kicks off the series before anyone else AND because you’re a backer, you'll be able to access the first season for free. We’re still working out all of the logistical details and should have an update around how all of this will work in late 2020.

We also announced a few more key players on our creative team, each mega-talented in their craft:
  • Laura Bailey, Taliesin Jaffe, Ashley Johnson, Liam O’Brien, Matthew Mercer, Marisha Ray, Sam Riegel, and Travis Willingham (executive producers): Along with stepping back into their roles as the voices of Vox Machina, our cast will also serve as executive producers of the animated series.
  • Brandon Auman (executive producer): You may know Brandon as the executive producer of Star Wars Resistance and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, as well as his writing on Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes and the upcoming Blade Runner: Black Lotus.
  • Chris Prynoski (executive producer, Titmouse): Chris is pretty much the guy that makes all the Titmouse magic happen and has played a major role in a bunch of cool animated projects, like Big Mouth, Niko and the Sword of Light, Tigtoneand The Venture Brothers.
  • Sung Jin Ahn (supervising director): Sung Jin is an Emmy-Award nominated director and has worked alongside Chris as the director for Niko and the Sword of Light, as well as other incredible projects like Motorcity and TRON: Uprising.
Our crazy little show was born on Twitch and we’re absolutely thrilled at the opportunity to continue to grow and develop deeper roots within the Amazon ecosphere.

We love you all very much and… Is it Thursday yet?

<3

Critical Role
 
Last edited:
Russ Morrissey

Comments

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I think is the branding of the streamers or the settings gets bigger than D&D, those really trying to develop the form will drop D&D in favor of that other branding. Not least, by the way, because if streaming truly does go mainstream (har har) big corporations are going to be involved and they aren't going to want to have to tie themselves to Hasbro or WotC by way of the D&D brand.
If - and I emphasise the if - CR were to become bigger than D&D, I wonder what effect that would have on D&D's current growth, given that they cite the majority of that being due to streaming. Especially if other streamers followed CR and played their game, as the way of getting viewers would be "playing the game that CR plays", whatever that might be.
 

5ekyu

Adventurer
They’re growing as a business. They own the CR IP and are monetising it well. At some point that might include selling the official CR games, which they also might enjoy playing. Or not. It’s all just conjecture.
Actually, a tad of history.

Thry did market CR rpg - the setting for their first campaign- printed sold thru Green Ronin.

It was very very shortly after that I saw another streamer I enjoyed watching wind down, wrap up their long running stream thst was in someone else's IP for a new one using a different flexible new rpg and in their own new IP. I saw that as a direct play to be able to sell their own setting book in a year or so.

The opportunity to market your home setting if your stream hits numbers ought to be a huge draw for stream in your own IP, even if its using someone else's system.
 

Urriak Uruk

Adventurer
If - and I emphasise the if - CR were to become bigger than D&D, I wonder what effect that would have on D&D's current growth, given that they cite the majority of that being due to streaming. Especially if other streamers followed CR and played their game, as the way of getting viewers would be "playing the game that CR plays", whatever that might be.
This is so ridiculous. Sure CR fandom could outgrow D&D, but what does that matter? CR is D&D. They're not going to change back to Pathfinder, or any other system, as they know that people following the series will be confused by a sudden change in what dice rolls mean and the new terms, etc.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
This is so ridiculous. Sure CR fandom could outgrow D&D, but what does that matter? CR is D&D. They're not going to change back to Pathfinder, or any other system, as they know that people following the series will be confused by a sudden change in what dice rolls mean and the new terms, etc.
Hmmm. You’re commenting on the end of a series of exchanges, but it sounds like you haven’t read the context of them, which discusses the situations in which they might want to publish their own IP. Maybe scroll back a bit? It’s all hypothetical, but it’s not nonsensical.
 

Urriak Uruk

Adventurer
Hmmm. You’re commenting on the end of a series of exchanges, but it sounds like you haven’t read the context of them. Maybe scroll back a bit?
I don't need to, I responded to your post, that's it.

Especially if other streamers followed CR and played their game, as the way of getting viewers would be "playing the game that CR plays", whatever that might be.

The game CR plays is 5E D&D, and almost certainly will be until 6E releases (then I could see CR switching to something else if 6E is weird).
 
I don't need to, I responded to your post, that's it.
That's a very strange thing to say. I mean, I can't think of a reasonable example of entering a conversation mid-exchange and feeling justified in trying to critique a statement without having any context whatsoever. Actively avoiding finding any context, in fact.

What is this, Twitter?
 

LuisCarlos17f

Adventurer
* The official action figures of CR will be sold by McFarlane Toys.

* CR is the most famous now, but there are more game-live shows. I guess the key is to transmit a good feeling to the watchers, the public. Disney could dare to broadcast its own game-live show with teen starts, or a new teleserie about a group of teenages who play in a game-live show to earn money for the university scholarship, and the players learn to improve social skills or find the right balance between self-criticism and faith in oneself or we haven't be a prince or princess to be the heroes of our story, or about what means to be a true hero. The PCs could be recycled forgotten Disney characters. Even Hasbro with Allspark studio could produce a pilot episode, or a mini-serie to test.

* Is there any game-live show with a virtual tabletop? Where you don't see players but their PCs in a videogame screen.

* The public don't want bad vibes. WotC and CR should make the best effort for a good relation. Let's imagine a CR spin-off where players live adventures in Dragonlance to promote the setting, but they are allowed to destroy the canon, adding new things, for example a new character who really is a chronomancer who is pursuing a time dragon, Sturm Brightblade survived, Gilthana and Silvara are couple with children(!), the chaos war didn't start, and the god Raistlin from "that" future has promised something to lord Soth (Kitiara becomes his consort). And the PCs have to visit a parallel timeline where there is a religious cult of the seekers (psionic mystics) and the knights of the divine hammers, champions of the theocratic Istar empire. Don't you notice? Here we haven't to follow the canon lore and we could experiment.
 

zhivik

Villager
It’s all very hypothetical at this point. Sure, CR are about to have an animated series on Amazon, which will give them greater exposure, but it doesn’t necessarily mean many more viewers of the CR show. After all, not everyone is willing to watch 4-hour streams of people playing a tabletop RPG. Regarding the possibility of going beyond D&D - I kind of doubt it, because Matt has been DMing D&D all his life and it takes time to switch to another system, even more so to develop one (the latter is about the possibility of a totally new CR tabletop RPG). If you have a game system well suited for streaming, why change it?

My impression so far is that the cast are doing what they enjoy in their leisure time. For instance, Brian W. Foster’s Undeadwood limited series is based on the Weird West setting that uses the Savage Worlds ruleset, and I guess the reason is that he is a fan of Wild West settings. Taliesin Jaffe likes Vampire: the Masquerade a lot, so he may run another one-shot or a limited campaign at some point. I hear Ashley Johnson is a cyberpunk fan, so hopefully we can see a Cyberpank 2020/Red or a Shadowrun game from her :) My point is, no one at CR seems to be intentionally running away from D&D, they just do things they enjoy themselves. Sure, it can change at some point, but there is no way we can know that now.

By the way, in this day and age, you never know what may appeal to people. Just look at Matt Colville’s stream - he did a Dune board game stream for fun, and now it looks a lot of people want more of it (there are three games posted so far, it’s a lot of fun, check it out). I think diversity is good, as it expands your horizons. For instance, I was never a fan of D&D before I came across CR; I’ve always enjoyed sci-fi or horror more, like Shadowrun, World/Chronicles of Darkness, etc. So the more diverse content you get, the better, in my opinion.
 

LuisCarlos17f

Adventurer
I was thinking and Hasbro could produce its own webserie as CR. The "pilot episode" would be a cartoon set in the world of the Equestria Girls where a group of boy and girls play "Oubliettes & Ogres" in a game-live show (to earn enough money as streamers to play the university). The adventure is set in Jakandor (this is the setting most open to a reboot) an island where two faction are confronted, the charonti and the knorr, but in the deep jungle appear a new menace. Two alien spaceships crashed in the land, a race of living constructs what can transform into animal, maximal vs predacons! Oh yeah, it is a fool idea, but at least I have had fun telling it, and something will laugh imagining a group of characters of Equestria Girls playing "Oubliettes & Ogres" whose plot is a parody of some famous franchise of speculative fiction. The script would be like the kid-friendly version of Rick & Morty.

Now seriously. Hasbro is the owner of Allspark. It could produce its own gamelive show if they want (they wouldn't need to spend a lot money, and better with a sponsor (for example the last Universal movie). And even with a spectacular virtual tabletop (then we would see something like a videogame streaming) created by their own videogame studio. They could produce "electronic tabletop rpgs", something like e-sports, but more storytelling.

* Could anybody advise me any gamelive show with subtitles? My level of oral English isn't so good. If I don't want to spend money, is there any free game-live show in youtube?
 

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