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D&D 5E Cubicle 7 Announces Victoriana for 5E

Cubicle 7's Victoriana was one of their first games (before them it was published by Heresy Games, back in 2003, using the Fuzion system, before Cubicle 7 bought the company). It mixes the 1800s London with steampunk and magic, with dwarves, ogres, beastfolk, and more living alongside humans. It was described by Shannon Appelcline as "Victorian Shadowrun" in his book Designers & Dragons. And now it's coming to 5th Edition (by which they mean compatible with D&D 5th Edition -- the last Victoriana RPG was its 3rd Edition).

The 2nd Edition, from Cubicle 7, was published in 2009, and the 3rd Edition in 2013. This will be the fourth iteration.

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Cubicle 7 is delighted to share some awesome news: we are currently working on Victoriana for Fifth Edition, which will launch under the Open Gaming License later this year!
Victoriana was one of the first games we published, so we are terrifically excited to be bringing it to a wider gamer audience. Victoriana is a diverse game world deeply imbued with Victorian period feel, gothic fantasy magic, and steampunk engineering.

Victoriana takes place in a fantastic alternate world of 1887, where the old ways of magic and tradition are losing ground to science, revolution, and the cloying smoke of industrialisation. The player characters, or Associates, navigate this dangerous world, solving mysteries, making social connections, and confronting horrors, while uncovering the secret conspiracies that operate in the shadows. Whether the Associates fight them or join them remains to be seen…

A Victoriana Player’s Guide will be the first release, but watch out for incoming telegrams about an accompanying adventure book filled with macabre mysteries, and a bestiary of the bizarre monsters and vile villains that haunt the Big Smoke.
 
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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey






I wonder if they'll do any rewriting? I owned a copy of an older edition years ago (no idea where it is now) but I'm pretty sure that it tied D&D-esque races directly to real-world regions. So basically humans came from western Europe, while (for instance) Africans were orcs. I remember being a little skeezed by it at the time, and that was a long time ago. There's less tolerance for that sort of thing now.

Happy to be corrected if my memory is letting me down (it is possible I'm thinking of another setting), but if this is how it was, then I think a bit of a retcon would be appropriate.

EDIT: found my old copy, and I was indeed misremembering here. The orcs = Africans setting must have been something else, probably some long-lost product of the d20 glut. Sorry for confusing the issue.
 
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Libertad

Adventurer
I wonder if they'll do any rewriting? I owned a copy of an older edition years ago (no idea where it is now) but I'm pretty sure that it tied D&D-esque races directly to real-world regions. So basically humans came from western Europe, while (for instance) Africans were orcs. I remember being a little skeezed by it at the time, and that was a long time ago. There's less tolerance for that sort of thing now.

Happy to be corrected if my memory is letting me down (it is possible I'm thinking of another setting), but if this is how it was, then I think a bit of a retcon would be appropriate.

EDIT: found my old copy, and I was indeed misremembering here. The orcs = Africans setting must have been something else, probably some long-lost product of the d20 glut. Sorry for confusing the issue.

You're probably thinking of Wolsung, a Victorian-style setting which made certain non-human groups strongly associated with certain real-world races and ethnicities according to this Let's Read. Gnomes were Jews, Orcs were East Asians, Trolls were Nordic people, and Elves were the British aristocracy. As for the Asian orcs specifically, they weren't all evil but played into various Yellow Peril stereotypes.
 

God I wish C7 the best man. Rough few years they've been having lately.

All their work on the various Warhammer games has kept them plenty busy. I almost think this is part of their not having other licenses renewed. They just did not have the time and manpower to devote to them all.

I am looking forward to this because it may mean being able to find people to play it. I had looked at the most recent edition of the game, back when C7 still had their own forums and I was looking at everything else they made besides TOR, and also looked at Space 1889, but the usual problem of getting people to want to learn a new system reared it's ugly head.
 

GuyBoy

Adventurer
I remember staying with my Nan as a young boy in the late 1960s. My nan was full on East End and had been born in 1905. Her mum, however, had been born in 1880 and her house still had an outside loo in the garden. My great-nan would always tell me that, if I used the loo, “Jack the Ripper would get me.”
I guess that threat had been used against her as a child. It would have been realistically terrifying for her, and was still pretty disturbing for my 6 year old brain!

So, Victoriana from C7 it is for me.

PS Canning Town for any Londoners interested, and, yes, I can do rhyming slang pretty well (aka thieves’ cant)
 

John R Davis

Explorer
I love Victorian games but always thought this had just too much magic / fantasy. Lots TV series in this theme at the moment so I hope it does well. They will have paid an insane amount for the WHFRP licence so need new stuff to do well.
 

Emmetation

Villager
I wonder if they'll do any rewriting? I owned a copy of an older edition years ago (no idea where it is now) but I'm pretty sure that it tied D&D-esque races directly to real-world regions. So basically humans came from western Europe, while (for instance) Africans were orcs. I remember being a little skeezed by it at the time, and that was a long time ago. There's less tolerance for that sort of thing now.

Happy to be corrected if my memory is letting me down (it is possible I'm thinking of another setting), but if this is how it was, then I think a bit of a retcon would be appropriate.

EDIT: found my old copy, and I was indeed misremembering here. The orcs = Africans setting must have been something else, probably some long-lost product of the d20 glut. Sorry for confusing the issue.
C7 staff here!

We will have plenty of Dev diaries over the next few months to dive into the details, but the short answer is that yes this is partially a reimagining of Victoriana. Things won't be the same as in previous editions. For example, number of the races from previous editions have been reconceptualised and altered to fit with the new "lineages" we've created. We don't have elves and dwarves for instance, but instead have elderan and khaldi. They stem from the original fantasy ideal but have changed as they've merged with human society. The name change isn't just superficial, we did it to avoid the baggage and assumptions that comes with saying "this character is a dwarf"

As I said, we'll have more in the coming months and can't wait to share it with folks!

EDIT: Forgot to say, Khaldi actually encompasses multiple fantasy races, so they are dwarves, halflings, and gnomes all rolled into one
 
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You should take care. I have found some isekai webcomics about girls reading novels, or otome videogames, set in a fantasy Victorian-age world and later in their reincarnation are born within these universes.
 

vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
You should take care. I have found some isekai webcomics about girls reading novels, or otome videogames, set in a fantasy Victorian-age world and later in their reincarnation are born within these universes.
So what?

I dont think ''Fantasy Victorian-age'' is a copyrighted idea. Carnival Row doesnt have to pay license fees to the creators of Arcanum or The Golden Compass...
 


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