log in or register to remove this ad

 

WotC D&D Gets A New Division At Hasbro

Hasbro is reorganizing and giving tabletop gaming -- Dungeons & Dragons and Magic: the Gathering -- a higher priority.

8H-1sjH1_400x400.jpg


According to the Wall Street Journal, WotC's revenue last year was $816 million (a 24% increase on 2019). Brian Goldner, Hasbro's Chief Executive, says WotC is predicted to double revenue from 2019 to 2023.

Hasbro is dividing into three 'units' -- Consumer Products (toys, classic board games); Entertainment (film, TV, licensing); and Wizards & Digital (WotC plus digital licensing).

Hasbro bought WotC in 1999 for about $325M.

 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Remathilis

Legend
And a hue and cry goes out from all the older fans who desperately want D&D sold off and bought by someone who "gets it" and changes the game back to the old ways they think it is supposed to be. :)
I wish they sold it off; to Paizo. Better left in the hands of actual gamers and not corporate stockholder butt-kissers.

Although I'm disappointed in Paizo with their PF2e debacle, and they forever lost my support. Now I've grown suspicious of them.
Right on cue...
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Dausuul

Legend
The Tolkien and Warhammer crossovers appear to be purely Magic-related at this point, but I could imagine D&D being pulled in as well. (I mean, D&D is halfway to being a Tolkien crossover already.)

My initial reaction to seeing that Wizards plans on doing a Tolkien Magic set was "MY CHILDHOOD! IS NOTHING SACRED?" Then I thought about building a Commander deck headed up by the Witch-King of Angmar, and suddenly I was okay with it. Which leaves me with the uneasy feeling that I'm the baddie... :)
 

Von Ether

Adventurer
"Hasbro bought WotC in 1999 for about $325M."


And then quickly sold off the D&D video game rights, which adds some irony to this bit of news.
 

embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
The Tolkien and Warhammer crossovers appear to be purely Magic-related at this point, but I could imagine D&D being pulled in as well. (I mean, D&D is halfway to being a Tolkien crossover already.)

My initial reaction to seeing that Wizards plans on doing a Tolkien Magic set was "MY CHILDHOOD! IS NOTHING SACRED?" Then I thought about building a Commander deck headed up by the Witch-King of Angmar, and suddenly I was okay with it. Which leaves me with the uneasy feeling that I'm the baddie... :)
JRR Estate: No Hobbits in D&D!
TSR: What about halflings? They're like Hobbits in every way except the spelling.
JRR Estate: Ummmm...
Every player since: Okay guys! Wherever you see "halfling" written, just pronounce it "Hobbit." They can't send lawyers to everyone's rec room. And go ahead and stat up Gandalf and Thorin while you're at it...
 

Wrathamon

Adventurer
JRR Estate: No Hobbits in D&D!
TSR: What about halflings? They're like Hobbits in every way except the spelling.
JRR Estate: Ummmm...
Every player since: Okay guys! Wherever you see "halfling" written, just pronounce it "Hobbit." They can't send lawyers to everyone's rec room. And go ahead and stat up Gandalf and Thorin while you're at it...
I've never called them hobbits ... in any D&D game i played. /shrug I am sure some do but not every player since
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
The Tolkien and Warhammer crossovers appear to be purely Magic-related at this point, but I could imagine D&D being pulled in as well. (I mean, D&D is halfway to being a Tolkien crossover already.)

My initial reaction to seeing that Wizards plans on doing a Tolkien Magic set was "MY CHILDHOOD! IS NOTHING SACRED?" Then I thought about building a Commander deck headed up by the Witch-King of Angmar, and suddenly I was okay with it. Which leaves me with the uneasy feeling that I'm the baddie... :)
We're unlikely to see D&D crossovers with Warhammer and Middle-Earth, as the RPG license for both is already with other companies. But you never know . . .

I have mixed feelings about Magic crossing over with D&D, Warhammer, and Middle-Earth . . . . I feel like I'm either going to be disappointed with the dilution of the Magic setting & brand, or be even more addicted to purchasing boxes and boxes of cardboard . . . . or both.
 



Hatmatter

Laws of Mordenkainen, Elminster, & Fistandantilus
One wonders if the growth will be sustainable post-Covid. That is, when people can go back to bars, concerts and sporting events, are they still going to play D&D, buy books, sub DNDBeyond, etc?
Well, there is a (healthy) addictive quality to role-playing. Once one's imagination seizes on the fantastic, it is not so easy to give it up. At least, that has been my experience.
 



Hatmatter

Laws of Mordenkainen, Elminster, & Fistandantilus
There is no doubt some people will have fallen in love with D&D and will continue to play. Similarly there will surely be some drop off. I am actually more interested in how the pandemic has changed D&D -- how, where and why it is played. For most of D&D's history it has been an obsessive sort of hobby and I feel like there's a casualness to it now (I do not mean that as any sort of pejorative) it hasn't had mostly. Most of us (meaning GenX nerds) grew up playing like the Stranger Things kids: for hours and hours in the dark of the basement. I used to LOVE marathon sessions ans still miss them. I don't feel like that is a common way to play for the Millenial players and others that have recently discovered the hobby.
This has been my observation as well. Well said, Reynard.
 

embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.


Hatmatter

Laws of Mordenkainen, Elminster, & Fistandantilus
I wish they sold it off; to Paizo. Better left in the hands of actual gamers and not corporate stockholder butt-kissers.

Although I'm disappointed in Paizo with their PF2e debacle, and they forever lost my support. Now I've grown suspicious of them.
I think Wizards of the Coast has been very nurturing with the legacy of Dungeons & Dragons and has published wonderful books. Of course, when I fall in love with someone, or something, I tend to embrace.
 


embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
There is no doubt some people will have fallen in love with D&D and will continue to play. Similarly there will surely be some drop off. I am actually more interested in how the pandemic has changed D&D -- how, where and why it is played. For most of D&D's history it has been an obsessive sort of hobby and I feel like there's a casualness to it now (I do not mean that as any sort of pejorative) it hasn't had mostly. Most of us (meaning GenX nerds) grew up playing like the Stranger Things kids: for hours and hours in the dark of the basement. I used to LOVE marathon sessions ans still miss them. I don't feel like that is a common way to play for the Millenial players and others that have recently discovered the hobby.
Once you put up faux-wood paneling and put in a ping-pong table, it stops being a basement and starts being a rec room.
 
Last edited:



Judging by history, I think a premium white box reprint is more likely.

I'm not sure today's audience really cares about that. The OSR folks picked that up a few years ago and largely saturated that market.

Are there a lot of 20-somethings pining for a little wooden box with the original booklets inside?

If they do re-release the White Box, I hope they do what they did at the end of 3E and put out premium reprints of the other editions; I really regret not picking up the 3E premium reprints then. I was just exhausted by 3E at that point and didn't appreciate that I'd want the deeeeluxe versions of my shelves as a reference work today. (I did pick up the 1E reprints then, although I wish they'd put out a reprint of Fiend Folio as well.)
 

Visit Our Sponsor

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top