d&d is anti-medieval

David Howery

Adventurer
Robert E Howard was from Texas and spent his early life amongst real Cowboys, his influences were Jack London and Rudyard Kipling as well as Norse and Greek Mythology and his stories combine Texas sensibilities with the Weird fantasy genre.
I'd bet he read ERB and HR Haggard as well (one of the Conan stories practically duplicates a scene from one of the Quatermain novels)…
 

Henry

Autoexreginated
Which is interesting, given that many of the tropes of Westerns come from other sources. Fighting off bandits? That's The Magnificent Seven, which comes from The Seven Samurai. Fighting off the local evil Sheriff is totally Robin Hood.
Lenina Huxley: Oh, and the joyjoy way you paused to make a glib witticism before doing battle with that strangely-weaponed Scrap, it was so, so...
John Spartan: (losing it) Hey, this isn't the Wild West! The Wild West wasn't even the Wild West!
 
But yeah, your standard D&D setting is basically the VERY early Rennasaince by way of Tolkein, Vance, Howard, Lovecraft, Eastwood, and Lee. With Eberron adding in Hammersmith and Haggard, Dark Sun grabbing some Burroughs, Spelljammer pulling from Roddenberry, and Planescape putting all of that into a blender.
 

oriaxx77

Villager
The setting is usually medieval, but players usually act like it is a superhero setting. High level adventurers does not fit. They are usually above the law like Superman or something. It is hard to accept to bow to a noble when you are a 20 th level hedge witch with disintegration memorized. Or to leave your vorpal sword when you enter an audience chamber. But do not expect any serious play when half the party either half orc paladin or hobbit warlock. D&D is not meant to be played as a serious RPG. You should find seriousness and historical accuracy? elsewhere.
 

Bacon Bits

Adventurer
Lenina Huxley: Oh, and the joyjoy way you paused to make a glib witticism before doing battle with that strangely-weaponed Scrap, it was so, so...
John Spartan: (losing it) Hey, this isn't the Wild West! The Wild West wasn't even the Wild West!
I've just realized that I saw Demolition Man so many years before I read Brave New World that the name of Sandra Bullock's character never occurred to me to be a reference. It's in giant bold letters the size of the Hollywood sign!
 

MechaTarrasque

Adventurer
I'd bet he read ERB and HR Haggard as well (one of the Conan stories practically duplicates a scene from one of the Quatermain novels)…
Howard's biggest science fiction story, Almuric, is very ERB-esque. Too much so in my opinion, it didn't feel like REH was adding anything to the story. He did better with later writing--his Yellow Peril style stories had a more distinctive REH take on them. Despite the topic, there is a very different feel from a Sax Rohmer Fu Manchu story, almost a Daniel Craig James Bond vs. Roger Moore James Bond difference.
 

gyor

Legend
It's very simple I've seen a lot of folks confuse feudalism with the middle ages, they aren't the same thing. Not that all of D&D is feudalistic of course, it has other types of government too. But nothing like the middle ages accept occasional window dressing.
 

Galandris

Adventurer
ffs, people argue that D&D math is hard. You know, adding and substracting 2 or 3 single digit numbers.

And now we should calculate plate armour price in 27 cows, 3 silver bars, an emerald, 7 days of plowing fields and 9 carats of ruby dust.
Not even going into the joys of bartering, I don't think many players would actually wrap their mind around simple concepts of real world use of coins, like "not decimal" (Lsd system but any other exotic multiple system would work in any world before the French Revolution and their strange decimal obsession...) or the idea that the valuation unit was not the monetary unit (you worked hard to use a 20 and 12 system? Here is a guinea, worth... 21 shillings). (Is there any published settings where the authors used that? Usually they make up calendars, but don't venture into monetary systems...)

There you can gain titles and such, but it is strongly hinted that you are taming/settling the frontier or new lands by building a stronghold and such.

Europe overall had people building castles, but in many ways taming the land and wandering through the wilderness was more of an American ideal.
Not disagreeing with you, but taming the wilderness was more the province of monks, draining swamps, clearing and deforesting land, than one of the secular lord, but it was not totally outside the MA mindset.
 

Helldritch

Explorer
I think that you're all forgetting the Arthurian legends. Lancelot du Lac was a knight errant (and the best example of what a knight/paladin should be until he fell). The adventures of the Green Knight followed by his nemesis of a beast (whatever its name, too long). What about Galahad? They were all "questing" just like our adventurers are doing. Even in the old medieval times, there were mercernary for hire, bounty hunters (their task was usually to bring the head of their querry). Remove magic and the dark ages/medieval and early renaissance was a bit more outlandish than you give it credit for. Nobles were ready to hire mercenaries (adventurers?) so as to not risk their own men. You need your loyal men in case of a rebellion or an outside invasion. Becauise of this, losing a man that is loyal to you is way worst than losing a man for hire. Even in the late renaissance there were men for hire. Think about Pirates, Bucaneers and Privateers. Instead of the landlock bandits/mercernaries, they were doing the same thing but they were called different names because they were on boats/vessels. Countries (and nobles) were giving these men a litteral immunity for whatever they were doing while under their employment.

Even the romans were using auxiliairies (read here mercenaries) in their armies. Some men were professional slave hunters and they were often hired to find criminals too. Its not because the "cowboys" are the closest known exemple of what our adventurers are doing that there was no examples of the same behavioral patterns in previous erra. And we should mention that there are mercenary companies/units/squads in our time too (and, unfortunately, assassins for hire).

I would tend to agree that in previous editions, the players were more less "immune" to what the lawful leaders could throw at them (especialy at a higher level). That is no longer the case with bounded accuracy. Also do not forget the assumption that the players are supposed to be heroes (or anti-heroes, I know that there are variations). We must not view the petty baron with our modern eyes. We must see him through the eyes of medieval times. Rank is fairly imbeded in the minds of that time. The players should respect him unless he's a total jerk. Even then, they should simply walk away and not work for the jerk again. On the other hand, the petty baron isn't stupid, if that band of adventurer/mercernary could do what his men could not, he will show a healthy respect. And if your heroes are out of control, isn't it time for brave bands of adventurers to do the job of removing this evil treath from the kingdom?
 

Helldritch

Explorer
Early renaissance yes, depending on where you are in the FR. If you don't use firearms then it is late medieval. The steam punk aspect would be the Lanthaneese and Alrhuaa (where flying ship and firearms can be seen relatively often (if you allow firearms). But I like the Magisteam connotation. Fits the Realm quite nicely. Greyhawk on the other hand, is fully fantastic medieval, that is why it is my favourite setting.
 

gyor

Legend
Early renaissance yes, depending on where you are in the FR. If you don't use firearms then it is late medieval. The steam punk aspect would be the Lanthaneese and Alrhuaa (where flying ship and firearms can be seen relatively often (if you allow firearms). But I like the Magisteam connotation. Fits the Realm quite nicely. Greyhawk on the other hand, is fully fantastic medieval, that is why it is my favourite setting.
There is some Lantanese/Gondite tech in the Swordcoast cities like Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate, like Waterdeep has Trolley's.

And Mulhorand has literal steam tech.
 
D&D is a fictionalized version of a romantic renaissance account of a middle ages that never was, with a ton of other cultural influences layered on. Did anyone really think it was an accurate medieval simulator? It pretty obviously isn't, nor do I expect it to be one, nor do I think any design weight was attached to accurate simulation. As I said above, this all seems pretty Captain Obvious to me.:whistle:
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
D&D is a fictionalized version of a romantic renaissance account of a middle ages that never was, with a ton of other cultural influences layered on. Did anyone really think it was an accurate medieval simulator? It pretty obviously isn't, nor do I expect it to be one, nor do I think any design weight was attached to accurate simulation. As I said above, this all seems pretty Captain Obvious to me.:whistle:
This just in ... breaking news ... Star Wars is also not an accurate depiction of interstellar travel, habitable planets or space combat ... tune in at 11 for more information ... repeat ... breaking news ...
 

gyor

Legend
I forgot to add Mulhorand literally came up with Steam Punk technology, they use a rock enchanted to always remain hot to produce steam to power machines that help irrigation of their farms, something that they under utilized because Horus Ra hated change. This is why Thoth made a better Pharoh.

And of course Zakhara has clockwork mages, but folks keep forgetting that and only think of Lantan when it comes to tech.
 

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