D&D Legos: Why don't we have them?

Xeviat

Explorer
You know what? While D&D is at the highest levels of popularity then it's ever been, while they're working on making a movie and have multiple high profile video games coming out ... why haven't we gotten a D&D Lego (or megablocks, or whatever) deal? It seems like the products would simply design themselves:

  • Bucket of Player Characters - 5-10 mini fig bodies, two or three heads for each of the races (more for human and elf, since they can be used for other things), with parts for helmets, armor, weapons, wings ...
  • Bucket of Orcs - mini figs for your orc horde needs.
  • Bucket of Goblins - mini figs for your goblin horde needs.
  • Monster Manual Packs - sets for building 3 or so smaller classic monsters, like rust monsters, displacer beasts.
  • Iconic Monsters - big sets for making big iconic monsters and villains, like Orcus or Gargantuan Dragons
  • Dungeon Terrain - for making dungeon rooms
  • Wilderness Terrain - for making wilderness maps
  • Urban Terrain - etc.
Just seems like it would be fun and useful, plus many would be useful for other lego aficionados.

What are other product tie-ins you'd like to see?
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
If you get a chance, watch the Netflix series The Toys That Made Us. The Lego episode. You might have your answer. Legos are quite expensive to make and the fads/interest is often too short lived. The company almost went under a few times due to bad licensing predictions. Most of their money makers are in house things, like Ninjago. Others are huge IP, like star wars or marvel. D&D just isn't big enough to justify the costs of design and manufacture.
 

Undrave

Hero
I got a few blind bags of D&D Kreons.

They came with a round base that fit perfectly in the usual grid. They had pieces for Tieflings and Dragonborns. You could put on armor on your Kreon, or give them a staff or a mace...

Great potential for building your own character to your specification, but for some reason they didn't bother to market this stuff to ACTUAL DnD player (or anybody really). And it was back during 4e's waning days.

Eventually some of the pieces (plus GI Joe pieces) went and got reused for the Transformers Kreon Warriors line.

Knight Soundwave was pretty neat. He came with a wooden Laserbeak.
 

Tonguez

Adventurer
KREO, Lego castle and Lego Heroica already do it

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theres also Lego Lord of the Rings

I suppose DnD licenced figures might have a market...
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Kreo is kinda off brand knock off Lego.

Not sure if you can even get it here now I think my niece had some.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
You know what? While D&D is at the highest levels of popularity then it's ever been, while they're working on making a movie and have multiple high profile video games coming out ... why haven't we gotten a D&D Lego (or megablocks, or whatever) deal? It seems like the products would simply design themselves:

  • Bucket of Player Characters - 5-10 mini fig bodies, two or three heads for each of the races (more for human and elf, since they can be used for other things), with parts for helmets, armor, weapons, wings ...
  • Bucket of Orcs - mini figs for your orc horde needs.
  • Bucket of Goblins - mini figs for your goblin horde needs.
  • Monster Manual Packs - sets for building 3 or so smaller classic monsters, like rust monsters, displacer beasts.
  • Iconic Monsters - big sets for making big iconic monsters and villains, like Orcus or Gargantuan Dragons
  • Dungeon Terrain - for making dungeon rooms
  • Wilderness Terrain - for making wilderness maps
  • Urban Terrain - etc.
Just seems like it would be fun and useful, plus many would be useful for other lego aficionados.

What are other product tie-ins you'd like to see?
Legos PCs are 2 for a $1 at dollar tree. Grab them and paint them how you want them to. Two of my occasional gamers use Legos as their mini. I used legos to build my war machines. Caution taking a dremel cutting blade to a lego flat will get you high.


 
You know what? While D&D is at the highest levels of popularity then it's ever been, while they're working on making a movie and have multiple high profile video games coming out ... why haven't we gotten a D&D Lego (or megablocks, or whatever) deal? It seems like the products would simply design themselves:

  • Bucket of Player Characters - 5-10 mini fig bodies, two or three heads for each of the races (more for human and elf, since they can be used for other things), with parts for helmets, armor, weapons, wings ...
  • Bucket of Orcs - mini figs for your orc horde needs.
  • Bucket of Goblins - mini figs for your goblin horde needs.
  • Monster Manual Packs - sets for building 3 or so smaller classic monsters, like rust monsters, displacer beasts.
  • Iconic Monsters - big sets for making big iconic monsters and villains, like Orcus or Gargantuan Dragons
  • Dungeon Terrain - for making dungeon rooms
  • Wilderness Terrain - for making wilderness maps
  • Urban Terrain - etc.
Just seems like it would be fun and useful, plus many would be useful for other lego aficionados.

What are other product tie-ins you'd like to see?
We use Lego minis for D&D and various bricks to build scenery elements. Of course I'd like it if Lego was allowed to produce D&D specific material, it wouldn't be cheap however... Lego minifigs and their accessories are generally more expensive to produce than simple D&D plastic minis, for example the Lego "collectible minifigs" series cost typically around 3 bucks per minifig nowadays, and licensed Lego material is even more expensive than regular Lego due to the royalties.

On the other hand, there is already a lot of Lego stuff around which works very well for D&D, if you don't mind to adapt them a little bit: we have elves, dwarves, orcs (called "trolls" in Lego sets), goblins, mummies, werewolves, snake-people (use as yuan-ti), lizardfolks, dragonfolks, skeleton, zombies, vampires, wild animals... If anything, one issue is that small-size characters (such as halflings, gnomes and goblins too) aren't really that small, you can use shorter Lego legs but they won't look much different on the ground; sometimes we have used Lego Heroica goblins to represent smaller critters, but then those are REALLY small :)

Perhaps the main difficulty is that many of those are not currently on the shelf anymore, and can only be found second hand nowadays... for instance, I wish I had bought more orcs/trolls sets back then when they were on sale, as now I don't have enough for a good "mass" battle. On the other hand I have more vampires I'll ever need :D The current Lego offer on the shelves is not the best for D&D use, because there is no classic "fantasy" or medieval series at the moment, there is only NinjaGo and a modern ghost-based theme called Hidden Side, but Lego themes comes and go so keep an eye open.
 

Bupp

Explorer
When I started playing with my kids, we used Lego minifigs as PC minis. I would use flat paper minis for monsters. I wrote about it here: Search Results for “lego” – Jon Bupp

My daughter is 19 now, and runs a game with her friends. She uses Lego at the table. At session 0 after character creation, she pulled out her minifig collection and had them all build custom minis. She's told me that she's built up battle scenes ala dwarven forge.

You can get all kinds of accessories at Brickforge
 

Dire Bare

Adventurer
In addition to fantasy-themed Legos and knock-off Legos (KRE-O, etc) there is a Lego "mod" community out there producing all sorts of Lego-compatible pieces, including fantasy-themed stuff perfect for D&D. Probably more expensive than official Legos though . . . .
 

MoonSong

Rules-lawyering drama queen but not a munchkin
for example the Lego "collectible minifigs" series cost typically around 3 bucks per minifig nowadays, and licensed Lego material is even more expensive than regular Lego due to the royalties.
More like $5 close to me. And well, like someone upthread said, there's nothing in the shelves right now. This is why I use playmobil instead:
 
In addition to fantasy-themed Legos and knock-off Legos (KRE-O, etc) there is a Lego "mod" community out there producing all sorts of Lego-compatible pieces, including fantasy-themed stuff perfect for D&D. Probably more expensive than official Legos though . . . .
That's true. Also, it might be possible to use 3d printing.
 

Dire Bare

Adventurer
That's true. Also, it might be possible to use 3d printing.
I jumped down an internet rabbit hole on this a few years back . . . and you basically have some small, in-the-garage companies casting unofficial Lego pieces, small "print" runs and then sold online or in unofficial Lego retail stores (there's such a store in my town, sells nothing but Legos and Lego-knockoffs). And, yes, you also have folks going the 3D-printing route, with designs on sites like Shapeways you can have printed and shipped to you, and perhaps STL files to download and print yourself.

I was impressed with the variety of accessories for fantasy figures, hell, figures from ANY genre! I think the Lego-obsessed community (at least the part that strays from official Legos) is small, but passionate! But, unless you are picking up second-hand Legos at yard sales (or stealing them from your own children) . . . . NOT a cheap way to go!
 

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