5E Dragonlance adaptation to D&D 5th Edition

oreofox

Explorer
While I am not a fan of what came after Dragons of Summer Flame (wasn't really much a fan of that book, but it wasn't terrible), I liked what they did with the 3e Dragonlance books, including the content made based on the post War of the Lance timeline. I'm not sure what timeline you were going for with your conversion, but I assume the official one if you have a form of mystic as well as sorcerer. From my memory of reading the 3e books, they have good aligned draconians made from chromatic dragon eggs.

As for your other races: I'd personally build the draconians off the dragonborn, make the evil dwarves use the duergar from Xanathar's, and I believe there's a derro race write-up in another book, and modify to fit how you see them. You also don't have the Dimernesti/Dargonesti sea elves. I'd go with the aquatic elf write-ups in Mordenkainen's, but add in the ability to change into a sea otter (dimernesti) and dolphin (dargonesti). If you wanted to add in those elves as a playable race for your write-up. Other than those, I think you've done a pretty good job.
 

PabloM

Explorer
While I am not a fan of what came after Dragons of Summer Flame (wasn't really much a fan of that book, but it wasn't terrible), I liked what they did with the 3e Dragonlance books, including the content made based on the post War of the Lance timeline. I'm not sure what timeline you were going for with your conversion, but I assume the official one if you have a form of mystic as well as sorcerer. From my memory of reading the 3e books, they have good aligned draconians made from chromatic dragon eggs.
Yes, we based our guide in the 3e era books and the current official timeline. Anyway, with the tools presented in the pdf anyone can adapt the elements they want to their games.

As for your other races: I'd personally build the draconians off the dragonborn, make the evil dwarves use the duergar from Xanathar's, and I believe there's a derro race write-up in another book, and modify to fit how you see them. You also don't have the Dimernesti/Dargonesti sea elves. I'd go with the aquatic elf write-ups in Mordenkainen's, but add in the ability to change into a sea otter (dimernesti) and dolphin (dargonesti). If you wanted to add in those elves as a playable race for your write-up. Other than those, I think you've done a pretty good job.
Thank you for your comments, all suggestions are welcome!
The draconians are built with the dragonborns in mind, so we are in the same page there.
In previous versions of the guide we used the duergar for the dark dwarves. But after a second thought we concluded the Duergar and the Derro are not much alike the Krynn´s dark dwarves, so we decided to make our versions.
And I agree with you in the treatment of the aquatic elves. The ones in Mordenkainen´s seems to fit in Krynn. We didn´t include them in the guide because... well, because we thought anyone would play one.
 

PabloM

Explorer
I uploaded the 2.2 version of the document including a lot of your corrections and suggestions.
Thanks!
 

hastur_nz

Villager
I understand, but I think while is a good idea, adds too unnecessary complexity to the game. The same effect (demonstrate the enhaced power of a Wizard in a High Sanction and the decrease of that power in a Low Sanction) can be done by adding or substracting a number to spell attack and save DC.
I think anything that causes your character's abilities to rise and fall with the cycles of the moon is just asking for trouble of some kind (e.g. ask your wife). Personally I never liked it when they added it to the Dragonlance rules (late AD&D book?), and for me it's especially not in the spirit of 5e - you're just asking for trouble with people wanting to game it.
 

Eltab

Villager
I believe there's a derro race write-up in another book
There are Dwarf, Halfling, Gnome sub-races in Sword Coast Adventurers' Guide. I'm not familiar enough with Dragonlance to offer advice, but the material may help you out.
 

Irda Ranger

Villager
I think anything that causes your character's abilities to rise and fall with the cycles of the moon is just asking for trouble of some kind (e.g. ask your wife). Personally I never liked it when they added it to the Dragonlance rules (late AD&D book?), and for me it's especially not in the spirit of 5e - you're just asking for trouble with people wanting to game it.
I still own the original Dragonlance Adventures hardback, and it has rules for the Moons effecting the power of magic, so I'm not sure what you mean by "adding it" to the setting. The Moons of magic having an effect on power has been a core attribute of Dragonlance since the very beginning (Night of the Eye, anyone?).

I'm not sure what you mean by players would "game" the system. Having to wait weeks or months for the moons to be in the right phase or conjunction doesn't sound like something that would be gamed often.
 

Pauln6

Explorer
I think anything that causes your character's abilities to rise and fall with the cycles of the moon is just asking for trouble of some kind (e.g. ask your wife). Personally I never liked it when they added it to the Dragonlance rules (late AD&D book?), and for me it's especially not in the spirit of 5e - you're just asking for trouble with people wanting to game it.
A +1 / -1 to spell DC is the simplest way to do it, possibly with enhancement to damage with a feat.
 

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
I can't find it now, but I think my update to Moon magic was to focus on the additional spells that a wizard of high sorcery would gain when in high sanction and removing the difficulty/enhanced caster level of the ability. I did this by enhancing the arcane recovery powers of the wizard. Low sanction they were able to recover 1 less spell level, high sanction was +1 and then +1 for each other moon in conjunction so the night of the eye would enable an extra 3 spell levels recovered via arcane recovery, quite the boon for low-level wizards especially. The actual numbers may have been higher, I think I have it written down somewhere on these forums.
 

Perun

Mushroom
I always liked the spellcasting distinctions between the three orders of magic, i.e. how Black Robes levelled faster and got access to higher level spells sooner, but had less spells overall (IIRC), with the situation reversed for the White Robes. IIRC, a black robe got access to 9th level spells at level 17, and a white robe at level 19. Red robes used the PHB spell advancement table, and got acces to 9th level spells a level 18.

I was disappointed when they didn't use this in the later versions of the DL campaign setting.
 

CapnZapp

Adventurer
Since then there's arrived wide consensus role-playing aspects make poor balancing mechanics.

In other words, don't expect something like this to reappear in official material. (House ruling it appears to be rather straight-forward, however)
 

PabloM

Explorer
Since then there's arrived wide consensus role-playing aspects make poor balancing mechanics.

In other words, don't expect something like this to reappear in official material. (House ruling it appears to be rather straight-forward, however)
Hahahaha, if something like this appear in official material I´ll be very very happy. But since Dragonlance doesn´t seems to be the next0 published setting, I´ll keep my unhappy house rules.
 

PabloM

Explorer
I'd say Ad/DisAd would be the easiest way, and most consistent with 5e
This idea is around in my head since the beginning. I really like the Advantage/Disadvantage in the spell attcks, but what about the spells that aren´t attacks?
 

Irda Ranger

Villager
Another idea for the Moons is giving you an extra spell slot. Maybe you get one spell slot of a level higher than your normal maximum spell slot. You don't learn any spells from that level, but you can cast your prepared spells using it.

And on the Night of the Eye, you get two slots, at Max +1 and Max +2.

The cool thing here is that if you have 9th level spell slots, this means on the Night of the Eye you have a 10th and 11th level spell slot. And you can now add house rules to the game for having 9th levels spells "At Higher Level". Or continue to scale up other spells, such as Create Undead.
 

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
I always liked the spellcasting distinctions between the three orders of magic, i.e. how Black Robes levelled faster and got access to higher level spells sooner, but had less spells overall (IIRC), with the situation reversed for the White Robes. IIRC, a black robe got access to 9th level spells at level 17, and a white robe at level 19. Red robes used the PHB spell advancement table, and got acces to 9th level spells a level 18.

I was disappointed when they didn't use this in the later versions of the DL campaign setting.
Close, in 1e Black robes did gain spells a lot faster than red or white, they gained 9th level spells at 13th not 17th level but since 13th was also the rank for master it meant that only 1 black robe could be level 13 or higher. The others gained them at level 15.

I also liked the distinction that black magic was the fast road to power and that while white magic-users may take longer, they ended up more powerful overall.
 

Perun

Mushroom
Close, in 1e Black robes did gain spells a lot faster than red or white, they gained 9th level spells at 13th not 17th level but since 13th was also the rank for master it meant that only 1 black robe could be level 13 or higher. The others gained them at level 15.
It's been a long time since I read the DL Adventures hardback... 13th level seems awfully low now.

But yeah, I always liked that system. I was introduced to D&D through DragonLance, and to this day, I kind of assume wizards will wear alignment-appropriate robes, regardless of the setting.

Regards.
 

Ath-kethin

Explorer
But yeah, I always liked that system. I was introduced to D&D through DragonLance, and to this day, I kind of assume wizards will wear alignment-appropriate robes, regardless of the setting.

Regards.
Ha! I'm with you there.

Hell, I was even introduced to high fantasy literature through the Dragonlance Chronicles, so quite a few things considered a bit trite or weird in some circles ring just fine for me. Alignment, Vancian casting; it was all given in-universe rationale in Dragonlance, and it all makes sense when viewed through that lens.

Team DL forever, baby. Or at least, Team Weis & Hickman DL forever. There's some real chaff outside the main books.
 

PabloM

Explorer
It's been a long time since I read the DL Adventures hardback... 13th level seems awfully low now.
Totally. I still think it's counterprodictive to mess with the spell slots in this edition. A circunstancial +1 / -1 seems to fit better.
 

Advertisement

Top