D&D 5E Dungeons and Dragons and the RPG Stigma

[MENTION=177]Umbran[/MENTION] - true. However, at least in Britain, there is an expectation of *something* to appear on the cv that shows you are a unique snowflake. The same is generally true at interview. No one wants to employ a robot, for all I put in my previous comment.
They want a whole person with a life outside of work - just not too much life outside of work. So, something should go there, just - as you say - tailor it to suit.
Where this may not be so easy is on job boards (them to you) as opposed to specific applications (you to them).
I list 'theatre' as an interest. At interview, if asked, I will elaborate.
I personally would advise against saying 'I play D&D', though. This may very well make me a coward and/or a Gygaxian apostate, but...what can I tell you? The job market is dark and full of terrors.
 

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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Supporter
[MENTION=177]Umbran[/MENTION] - true. However, at least in Britain, there is an expectation of *something* to appear on the cv that shows you are a unique snowflake.

Ah. Here in the US, for a long time it was expected you'd have a "Hobbies" section on your resume, especially if you were just out of college, as you couldn't have too much in the "work experience" section yet.

These days, though, they generally recommend you don't use a "Hobbies" section on your resume, rather for the reasons noted here - there are too many judgmental people out there who make too much or have incorrect impressions about particular hobbies or pursuits. They may not want you to be a robot, but what you do on your own time is not their business.
 

TreChriron

Adventurer
Supporter
I'm totally out and proud. People will attempt to give me gruff about it but I just smile and say "there are nerds in every hobby" (trap set) and wait them to explain their hobby (and how that could not possible include nerds) and then I explain why they are a nerd (trap sprung). Tends to create future solidarity.
 

ggroy

First Post
It turned out my now ex-wife hated gamer types. (Years later I found out her brothers were gamer types, whom she really despised. I suspect she was "projecting" her own disgust with them, onto me and other nerdy/gamer types).

For many years prior, she had no inkling that I use to play D&D. (My old D&D books were in my parents' basement for decades). When I first met her, I had already dropped D&D many years prior and at the time was more of a rock musician type.

Sometime during the mid-2000's when I started playing D&D again, it was another excuse to grate on her nerves. (Everything was on the rocks by then anyways).


Ironically, she was really into X-Files. Towards the end of my time with her, it was almost like a "pot calling the kettle black" thing. ;)
 

Redshirt

First Post
My two main hobbies are D&D and disc golf. While both have stigma's attached to them I never get any comments about D&D when it comes up. Can't say the same about disc golf.
 

S'mon

Legend
The predominant current wisdom I see is that your professional documentation (CV or resume) is not a place for *personal* pursuits, unless they are very clearly and directly related to the proposed work. If you have run a charity organization as a volunteer, and you're trying to get a job as an executive assistant, then that makes sense as the coordination elements are relevant. Otherwise? It isn't relevant, and doesn't belong in the discussion.

Yup, I always tell my students this - don't put ANYTHING on your CV unless you have a clear idea how it is going to help you get the job. I realised this by reading applications myself. :D
 

S'mon

Legend
[MENTION=177]Umbran[/MENTION] - true. However, at least in Britain, there is an expectation of *something* to appear on the cv that shows you are a unique snowflake. The same is generally true at interview. No one wants to employ a robot, for all I put in my previous comment.
They want a whole person with a life outside of work - just not too much life outside of work. So, something should go there, just - as you say - tailor it to suit.
Where this may not be so easy is on job boards (them to you) as opposed to specific applications (you to them).
I list 'theatre' as an interest. At interview, if asked, I will elaborate.
I personally would advise against saying 'I play D&D', though. This may very well make me a coward and/or a Gygaxian apostate, but...what can I tell you? The job market is dark and full of terrors.

'Special Snowflake' stuff will give you an edge IF it is 'special snowflake that makes me particularly suited to this job'. Theatre, like competitive ballroom dancing (two of my students had been in the Czech national ballroom dancing team!) IS the kind of area that may involve useful skills making you more attractive to many employers. They will be particularly interested in any organisational element, but just the team work element of successfully putting on a production together can be significant evidence, depending on what else is on your CV.

Unfortunately the teamwork element of successfully completing 'Lost Mine of Phandelver' is likely to go unappreciated.

In any case, I really don't think employers care at all about your non-work-relevant pastimes, and they may be a negative. Having 'Territorial Army' and 'temporary church officer' (and I'm an atheist!) were strikes against me seeking a job in UK academia, for instance.
 

pemerton

Legend
I really don't think employers care at all about your non-work-relevant pastimes, and they may be a negative. Having 'Territorial Army' and 'temporary church officer' (and I'm an atheist!) were strikes against me seeking a job in UK academia, for instance.
I gather that when it comes to hiring practices of Australian law firms, hobbies/interests can still be relevant - provided they demonstrate the right sort of interests/hobbies. (Team sports are still taken somewhat seriously, I think, "playing fields of Eton"-style.)

From my point of view, both when writing a reference and considering whether someone would make a good academic hire, I wouldn't pay any attention to hobbies/interests, but would consider some ways of presenting them on a CV a sign of poor judgement/writing skill.
 

pming

Legend
Hiya.

I've always been completely open about my RPG hobby. I have had some coworkers see me reading an RPG book during lunch and then comment about "Oh! You play that game? Isn't that for nerds and kids? *giggle/laugh/chuckle* Really?"...to which I just look at them and say "Yup, sure do. I've been playing RPGs for a good 34 years or so. Love it. Lots of fun! You've never played?".

It's usually that last question that stops them from the whole "you're a nerd!...na-na-na-na-naaa-naaah!" thing. Suddenly, they have to think about formulating an actual thought and response...in stead of an ignorant, emotion-based, retort. Rarely do I get someone who just continues with the moronic "you're a nerd!" word vomit. But when I do, I usually follow it up with a simple comment about "Yeah, well, at least I'm not wasting my money on cigarettes, booze or drugs, right?"...and wait for them to reply with the only "correct" reply of "Yeah, I guess so". Because if they reply with "No...I'd rather buy cigarettes, alcohol and crack!"...well, they just lost the whole "If society knew both of our preferred method of entertainment....who would The Masses approve of more?" thing. ;)

Basically, if I don't make a big deal out of it...they don't make a big deal out of it. I don't care either way. I enjoy it, and if they try and harass me for enjoying something that hurts nobody, screw 'em. Their loss.

^_^

Paul L. Ming
 

"Yup, sure do. I've been playing RPGs for a good 34 years or so. Love it. Lots of fun! You've never played?".

It's usually that last question that stops them from the whole "you're a nerd!...na-na-na-na-naaa-naaah!" thing.

Love it. A mix of turning around the question, and/or humor is a great way to handle most situations.
 

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