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Dungeons & Dragons Boom!

nobody69.420

Explorer
Hard to say. It didn't exist in 3E and was in it's infancy when 4E landed.

More online shopping as well.

VTTs are also nature tech, cutting edge in 2008.

I would say that, 5E being comparatively simple to play and being good are big factors.

Social media I would argue us a large part of it, the product being good also helps, negative social media can bury stuff.
I agree.
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
I have often thought if 4E was released now it would die even faster than in 2008-10. People would be burying it on you tube and Twitter.

3E released in the social media world would be interesting. It was fairly big at the time, people liked it as well so it would have been even bigger.
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
Oh. That's unfortunate, a lot of people have told me good things about 3.5e. I though that it would have done better, but I never looked at it's sales rates.
3.0 was the big hit of 3E, 3.5 split the playerbase. Not everyone upgraded.

As I understand it 3.0 came out at $20 on release. That was the same price as 2E in 1989. It sold a boatload, 3.5 was planned but they rushed it out the door at a higher price point.

At 3.0 price level a 3pp could not print their own phb and make money as not all the corporate types liked the OGL.

3.5 cost more and other companies made their own phbs. They probably only sold a few thousand copies but it scared the higher ups so they rushed 4E out the door.

With the higher price though Paizo could make their own. And we know what type of reception 4E got.
 

Hussar

Legend
Hard to say. It didn't exist in 3E and was in it's infancy when 4E landed.

More online shopping as well.

VTTs are also mature tech, cutting edge in 2008.

I would say that, 5E being comparatively simple to play and being good are big factors.

Social media I would argue us a large part of it, the product being good also helps, negative social media can bury stuff.
I'd hardly call VTT's "cutting edge" in 2008. Maptools, for example, was programmed in Java, and Fantasy Grounds was a dinosaur even back then. Roll20 and other browser based VTT's were still a pipe dream at that point.

But, no, VTT's have never been "cutting edge". Closer to "Kludge of old code that folks cobbled together to create a barely functional platform"
 

Zardnaar

Adventurer
I'd hardly call VTT's "cutting edge" in 2008. Maptools, for example, was programmed in Java, and Fantasy Grounds was a dinosaur even back then. Roll20 and other browser based VTT's were still a pipe dream at that point.

But, no, VTT's have never been "cutting edge". Closer to "Kludge of old code that folks cobbled together to create a barely functional platform"
They existed but online D&D has taken off yes?

Hell computer RPGs technically existed in the 70s but it was the 80s they gained much traction, 90s before there could be called mainstream.
 

Hussar

Legend
They existed but online D&D has taken off yes?

Hell computer RPGs technically existed in the 70s but it was the 80s they gained much traction, 90s before there could be called mainstream.
I'm sorry, I've lost the point you're trying to make here. I was simply commenting on the "cutting edge" thing for VTT's. VTT's have always been badly kludged together programs created by hobbyists. About the closest we've seen to a professionally developed VTT would be the rather short lived one from WotC for 4e. But, in any case, no, VTT's are not even close to "cutting edge" in technology.

I mean, the biggest innovation coming to VTT's will be the forthcoming Fantasy Grounds Unity. And it's built on the Unity engine, and that's fifteen years old. VTT's are a lot of things, but, "cutting edge" they are not. :D
 

happyhermit

Explorer
So in other words, the main reason for Dungeons and Dragons's rise in popularity is the rise in streaming and social media?
They conducted a massive playtest, getting tremendous amounts of feedback from their fans to produce a game that didn't alienate most of them and gave them what they wanted from a new version of D&D.

Then they released one of the most intuitive and easy to pick up ttrpgs (IME) that still managed to keep casual and not-so-casual players happy, they even had a very well regarded starter set to kick it off.

And, they released it into a highly receptive market that enjoyed the game, letting social networking and new media amplify that success.

There are a lot of possible 5e's out there that wouldn't have approached the popularity that we have now, for a multitude of reasons; complexity, bloat, jargon, ability to play Totm, etc. Heck AP podcasts and such were a thing back at the launch of 4e, but it wasn't a good system for that format by any means, so it never really could have benefited to the extent 5e has.

There could of course be universes out there where they did the giant playtest and research, released a game like 5e and it sunk, but there are probably even less where they released a game that went in opposite directions and it flew higher.
 

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