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D&D 5E Fizban's Treasury of Dragons: Dragon+ Detailed Outline and Descriptions

Here are a lot of juicy details about Fizban's Treasury of Dragons from the updated Issue 38 of Dragon+.

For those hoping this will be heavily Dragonlance, it looks unlikely -- they say they are only giving a "very brief nod" to the setting.

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You might think that the standard collective noun for dragons is either a flight of dragons, a weyr of dragons, a school of dragons, or a wing of dragons. Well, Fizban the Fabulous has so much valuable information to share with you about these unique creatures that “treasury” of dragons is the only description that properly captures it. Because once you begin to measure the impact dragons have on D&D, you realize they touch every facet of the game.

Fizban’s Treasury of Dragons is comparable to Volo’s Guide to Monsters or Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes, as it brings together a combination of lore and monster material,” Project Lead James Wyatt tells Dragon+. “This source book contains the revised dragonborn races, feats, and spells that we previewed in Unearthed Arcana, as well as magic items, a deeper dive into the Monster Manual dragons, dragon adjacent monsters, lair maps, and various tables to help you generate adventure ideas.”

Chapter One

“Following the introduction, Chapter One contains character options and is where you’ll find the revised dragonborn races, as well as the Way of the Ascendent Dragon monk and the Drakewarden ranger subclasses from previous Unearthed Arcana releases.

“Some of the feedback on the dragon subclasses said, ‘I want a dragon-flavored blank’ where blank is just about any other class in the Player’s Handbook. There’s a limit to the amount we can provide so we’ve included a table to spur players’ imaginations and help give any character they’re playing some dragon flavor.

“If you want a dragon-themed warlock, for example, you could play an archfey warlock whose patron is a moonstone dragon, a new kind of dragon that’s tied to the Feywild. If you want a dragon cleric, you can take any domain and worship Bahamut or Tiamat to add that dragon flavor. Maybe you’re from Eberron and have a dragonmark. Or you might decide that you gained your powers when you found a dragon claw that you now use as your spellcasting focus.”

Chapter Two

“The second chapter contains a handful of new spells, most of which we previewed in Unearthed Arcana. It also contains new magic items that have ties to dragons.

“If DMs and players really embrace this book then they’re going to be seeing a lot of dragons in their campaigns. One new concept we introduce here is hoard items. These are magic items that become more powerful when they’re steeped in a dragon’s hoard.

“If you find an item in a blue wyrmling’s hoard, for example, and then several levels later you use that item to kill an adult red dragon and you steep it in that hoard, it may become more powerful because it’s the hoard of an adult dragon. The item might also change its characteristics slightly, because it’s been affected by a red dragon’s magic instead of a blue dragon.”

Chapter Three

“This chapter is aimed at the Dungeon Master and is all about building dragons as unique characters—both in terms of personality and mechanical tweaks. We also look at how you can build encounters, adventures, and entire campaigns around dragons. This includes a whole bunch of tables that are a great way to quickly share a lot of really dense story ideas. We hope that these tiny nuggets spark inspiration in a DM’s brain.

“This is primarily a mainstream D&D book but we do give a very brief nod in the direction of Tarkir, which is Magic: The Gathering‘s dragon world, as well as Dragonlance. We also reference the second edition Council of Wyrms setting, which was another world that was built around dragons.

“The Council of Wyrms was a string of isles that were ruled by a bunch of different dragon clans. Their council gave the setting its name and in Fizban’s Treasury of Dragons we discuss different ways you might build a setting like that with dragons as major players.”

Chapter Four

“In this chapter we focus on lairs and hoards. This book embraces the D&D multiverse and talks about dragons as the quintessential creatures of the material plane. Bahamut and Tiamat created the material plane, so dragon essence is fundamentally tied to it. That explains why when a dragon creates its lair, it becomes a sort of magical nexus as the dragon’s essence seeps into the surrounding area and regional effects are created.

“We include some new regional effects, a couple of new lair actions that are tied to specific lair maps we include in the next chapter, as well as tables to help generate cool and interesting hoards. You’ll find a few other brand-new lair options later in the book, such as when we’re discussing amethyst dragons in Chapter Five and as part of certain monster entries in Chapter Six.”

Chapter Five

“Chapter Five makes up a third of the book and takes an in-depth look at each kind of dragon. By highlighting a dragon’s personality traits, ideals, and other creatures that might associate with them, we help you build a storyline around them.

“One of the guiding principles of this book is show don’t tell. We could simply tell you about the personality of brass dragons, but if we give you a bunch of tables that show you their personality traits and put words into that brass dragon’s mouth, that’s more effective. That might include objects that the brass dragon has a relationship with—maybe it has conversations with a bust of a philosopher that it calls Leonard!

“We also look at alignment. For example, chromatic dragons are typically evil, so can there ever be a good black dragon? The beauty of the word ‘typically’ is that there’s always the possibility. Each entry in this chapter starts with a table of personality traits and a table of ideals. And the final entry on the table of ideals is always something that’s dramatically outside the norm for that dragon’s alignment as we wanted to make the point that typically does mean typically, not always.”

Chapter Six

“This is the bestiary chapter, which makes up almost a third of the book. A revised version of the sapphire dragon is listed here, alongside the rest of the gem dragon family: amethyst, crystal, emerald, and topaz. It also includes stats for deep dragons, and moonstone dragons, as well as dragonborn champions, humanoid dragon servitors, and various other dragon-adjacent creatures. We also include stats for aspects of Bahamut and Tiamat.

“I have a fondness for dragon turtles and we’ve included additional age categories for those creatures. The dragon turtle in the Monster Manual breaks the pattern for size categories because it’s one size larger than an adult dragon. We’ve decided that’s an adult dragon turtle and have created some younger version scaled down from that. But the ancient dragon turtle is a monster.

“We’ve also included chromatic, metallic, and gem versions of what we call greatwyrm dragons. These creatures use the mythic monster rules from Mythic Odysseys of Theros to create epic battles. And the ancient dragon turtle is also in that category.”
 
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Rikka66

Adventurer
Since Council of Wyrms didn't get the full product line campaign setting treatment . . . . is it prohibited on the DMs Guild?!?!

For now, DMs Guild is limited to the Forgotten Realms, Ravenloft, Eberron, Ravnica, and Theros settings only, although you can also publish anything for 5th Edition that (i) is generic enough to be used in a permitted setting without effort and (ii) doesn’t explicitly use anything related to another official Wizards setting.
 

Dire Bare

Legend
For now, DMs Guild is limited to the Forgotten Realms, Ravenloft, Eberron, Ravnica, and Theros settings only, although you can also publish anything for 5th Edition that (i) is generic enough to be used in a permitted setting without effort and (ii) doesn’t explicitly use anything related to another official Wizards setting.
Council of Wyrms probably counts, even though it's just a one-off. But I wonder where WotC draws the line? How about the Jakandor books, or the "mini" settings in various modules? Thunder Rift?
 

Faolyn

Hero
I didn't want to sound like I dislike this direction. I love the idea that all true dragons seem to have the potential to be god-like. It reminds me of the Dragon Ascendant from the 3.5 Draconomicon. I just have a bit of a hard time seeing Null, the dragon god of death and Undead, or Sardior the god of gem dragons as just Great Wyrms is all.

I don't know, I might just need time and more info to help wrap my head around it is all.
It sounds like Great Wyrms are more like dragon Immortals that anything else now.
 




So reading the Dragon+ article for Fizban's, I notices these two snippets.

“We want to inspire DMs to think about the action of a campaign as transcending a single world of the material plane. For example, when a dragon becomes a dracolich it has repercussions on all the echoes of that dragon,” he says.

“Dragons such as Chronepsis or Aasterinian—who were identified as dragon gods in past editions of the game—are greatwyrms who have transcended the limitations of a single world in the material plane and united their energies across multiple worlds to become more godlike.”


The idea that something drastic like a dragon becoming a dracolich can affect other echoes in other planes is interesting.

On the other hand, I'm a bit confused about the second part. So the other Dragon Deities are just Great Wyrms now? Or did they use their status as Great Wyrms to ascend to Deityhood? It's hard to picture Null, who was often described as being either the sibling of Io/Asgorath or the sibling of Tiamat and Bahamut as just another Great Wyrm Dragon.

I'm not sure what to make of this.

I wonder if that is true Shadow Dragons as well, does one of the counter parts becoming a Shadow Dragon effect the rest?
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
You are the expert, what one thing would you bring to D&D from that setting?
Well, Tarkir is before my time (I got into Magic with the recent Ravnica stuff because of thebD&D book), but actually from what I know of Yarkir, the Subclasses appearing in this book actually fit the bill for what I would have expected. That and Elder Dragons, which might play a part in how they are approaching Great Wyrms here.

Other than that, complex and multifaceted Asian cultural depiction is the big thing that comes to mind.
 

So reading the Dragon+ article for Fizban's, I notices these two snippets.

“We want to inspire DMs to think about the action of a campaign as transcending a single world of the material plane. For example, when a dragon becomes a dracolich it has repercussions on all the echoes of that dragon,” he says.

“Dragons such as Chronepsis or Aasterinian—who were identified as dragon gods in past editions of the game—are greatwyrms who have transcended the limitations of a single world in the material plane and united their energies across multiple worlds to become more godlike.”


The idea that something drastic like a dragon becoming a dracolich can affect other echoes in other planes is interesting.

On the other hand, I'm a bit confused about the second part. So the other Dragon Deities are just Great Wyrms now? Or did they use their status as Great Wyrms to ascend to Deityhood? It's hard to picture Null, who was often described as being either the sibling of Io/Asgorath or the sibling of Tiamat and Bahamut as just another Great Wyrm Dragon.

I'm not sure what to make of this.
Sounds to me like they're trying to merge Magic's planeswalker concept with D&D.
 

Barantor

Explorer
Council of Wyrms probably counts, even though it's just a one-off. But I wonder where WotC draws the line? How about the Jakandor books, or the "mini" settings in various modules? Thunder Rift?
I've often wondered if they would have a problem with someone putting in Thunder Rift as a mini-setting that can be put anywhere.

I'm just glad they put all the player facing information that you'll have to reference in the front of the book instead of buried somewhere in the middle.
 


Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Btw is it just me or does this confirm in all but straight that Tarkir is going to get the D&D crossover treatment next time they release an MtG Tarkir set?

I think Tarkir is actually middling in their Rabiah scale, so that may never happen. I believe those cards in that set are not well received, though the world itself seems well-designed from a lore perspective.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I think Tarkir is actually middling in their Rabiah scale, so that may never happen. I believe those cards in that set are not well received, though the world itself seems well-designed from a lore perspective.
Yeah, the mechanical identity is tricky, with three color factions, and they sort of messed the world up up with time travel...but it may happen eventually. If it's not part of next year's releases it may be on ice.
 

I think Tarkir is actually middling in their Rabiah scale, so that may never happen. I believe those cards in that set are not well received, though the world itself seems well-designed from a lore perspective.

Arcavios is only 4 and its getting a book, Tarkir is usually a 4, but recently dropped to a 5.

Honestly there aren't many settings that are 1-3 on the Rabiah scale, 2 of which already have Setting books (Theros & Ravnica) & 2 of which have Planeshift articles and which are unlikely for other reasons (Zendikar and Dominaria), so for the next MtG crossover book, which they will likely want to tie to a recent card set, you have to start turning to the 4 and 5s, which honestly are most of the settings best suited for D&D Campaigns. Eldraine, Tarkir, Kaldheim, Amonkhet, and New Phyrexia.

Not that I think we will be getting anymore MtG setting books for the next 2 to 3 years, 5 settings books are being worked on, not including Strixhaven, and none of them are MtG settings. (I can't blame them for deciding its time to take a break on MtG D&D crossovers for abit).

When the time does come again I think it will be Tarkir, Anonkhet, Kaldheim, Eldraine, or New Phyrexia that gets the new setting book. Or it will be the book that merges the D&D and MtG multiverses.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
You are the expert, what one thing would you bring to D&D from that setting?

I'm not sure Tarkir is really special for one thing, it really is the sum of its parts. It is heavily inspired by Central Asian cultures (and not in an insensitive way, as far as I can see), like Mongolia, Tibet, etc.

It's extremely diverse from a racial perspective, having humans, orcs (that are more WoW-like), Djinn and Efreet (their like genasi but even more elemental in nature), naga, aven (essentially aarakocra), and the dog-race ainok.

There are five clans who contend over the world, divided mostly by ideology and a climatic region; for example, the Sultai are the naga clan who use undead and cling to mountain temple fortresses.

The weirdest part, and probably the most interesting, is that there are technically three Tarkirs; there is the past Tarkir, where the dragons and the many humanoid races went to war. And then there are the two possible futures, one where the dragons are all slain and the khans continue to fight amongst themselves; and the other where the dragons were victorious and became the dragonlords of each clan (and still wage war against each other).

Definitely not a surprise they are mentioned, they're probably the most dragon-infused setting in MtG, although dragons I think make appearances on most worlds.

1626799732474.png
 

I think Tarkir is actually middling in their Rabiah scale, so that may never happen. I believe those cards in that set are not well received, though the world itself seems well-designed from a lore perspective.
it is one of the better possible crossover settings as it has room to breathe now it just needs is a tense situation, have both timelines slam into each other with the help of something from outside the setting and let it get interesting.
 
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Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Arcavios is only 4 and its getting a book, Tarkir is usually a 4, but recently dropped to a 5.

Honestly there aren't many settings that are 1-3 on the Rabiah scale, 2 of which already have Setting books (Theros & Ravnica) & 2 of which have Planeshift articles and which are unlikely for other reasons (Zendikar and Dominaria), so for the next MtG crossover book, which they will likely want to tie to a recent card set, you have to start turning to the 4 and 5s, which honestly are most of the settings best suited for D&D Campaigns. Eldraine, Tarkir, Kaldheim, Amonkhet, and New Phyrexia.

Not that I think we will be getting anymore MtG setting books for the next 2 to 3 years, 5 settings books are being worked on, not including Strixhaven, and none of them are MtG settings. (I can't blame them for deciding its time to take a break on MtG D&D crossovers for abit).

When the time does come again I think it will be Tarkir, Anonkhet, Kaldheim, Eldraine, or New Phyrexia that gets the new setting book. Or it will be the book that merges the D&D and MtG multiverses.

Using Arcavios (Strixhaven) as an example is a misunderstanding of the scale, as that 4 is the likelihood of Strixhaven getting another card set in the future. The card set and the book were being developed before either were released, so at that time Strixhaven technically had a Rabiah scale of 1 (it was a certainty it was going to happen). Although the D&D book is getting released after the card set is, they didn't release the cards and then start developing the book, they were both decided ahead of time.

Looking at the Rabiah scale right now, I'm not sure which of these are obvious choices to be D&D books. I really like Tarkir and think it would make a great book, but it could also just be some new setting to MtG that takes a slot, or something different like Kaldheim coming back. Or as the old rumor mill suggests something like Kamigawa.

I wouldn't hold out on a book that explicitly merges MtG or D&D either; they've gotten plenty of chances to confirm that already and they've declined. I'm thinking they'll keep making the connections vague to try and satisfy everyone (may satisfy no one, but still).

Also, side-note my head-canon is now making Eldraine a Domain of Delight, like I already head-canon Innistrad a Domain of Dread.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Arcavios is only 4 and its getting a book, Tarkir is usually a 4, but recently dropped to a 5.

Honestly there aren't many settings that are 1-3 on the Rabiah scale, 2 of which already have Setting books (Theros & Ravnica) & 2 of which have Planeshift articles and which are unlikely for other reasons (Zendikar and Dominaria), so for the next MtG crossover book, which they will likely want to tie to a recent card set, you have to start turning to the 4 and 5s, which honestly are most of the settings best suited for D&D Campaigns. Eldraine, Tarkir, Kaldheim, Amonkhet, and New Phyrexia.

Not that I think we will be getting anymore MtG setting books for the next 2 to 3 years, 5 settings books are being worked on, not including Strixhaven, and none of them are MtG settings. (I can't blame them for deciding its time to take a break on MtG D&D crossovers for abit).

When the time does come again I think it will be Tarkir, Anonkhet, Kaldheim, Eldraine, or New Phyrexia that gets the new setting book. Or it will be the book that merges the D&D and MtG multiverses.
Winninger never said they were taking a break from MtG crossovers, he just said that the two Classic Settings, one returning Setting, and two all-new Settings weren't Magic related. If they do ten books between 2022 and 2023, that still leaves room for a Magic tie-in or two.
 
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