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D&D 5E Fizban's Treasury of Dragons: Dragon+ Detailed Outline and Descriptions

Here are a lot of juicy details about Fizban's Treasury of Dragons from the updated Issue 38 of Dragon+.

For those hoping this will be heavily Dragonlance, it looks unlikely -- they say they are only giving a "very brief nod" to the setting.

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You might think that the standard collective noun for dragons is either a flight of dragons, a weyr of dragons, a school of dragons, or a wing of dragons. Well, Fizban the Fabulous has so much valuable information to share with you about these unique creatures that “treasury” of dragons is the only description that properly captures it. Because once you begin to measure the impact dragons have on D&D, you realize they touch every facet of the game.

Fizban’s Treasury of Dragons is comparable to Volo’s Guide to Monsters or Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes, as it brings together a combination of lore and monster material,” Project Lead James Wyatt tells Dragon+. “This source book contains the revised dragonborn races, feats, and spells that we previewed in Unearthed Arcana, as well as magic items, a deeper dive into the Monster Manual dragons, dragon adjacent monsters, lair maps, and various tables to help you generate adventure ideas.”

Chapter One

“Following the introduction, Chapter One contains character options and is where you’ll find the revised dragonborn races, as well as the Way of the Ascendent Dragon monk and the Drakewarden ranger subclasses from previous Unearthed Arcana releases.

“Some of the feedback on the dragon subclasses said, ‘I want a dragon-flavored blank’ where blank is just about any other class in the Player’s Handbook. There’s a limit to the amount we can provide so we’ve included a table to spur players’ imaginations and help give any character they’re playing some dragon flavor.

“If you want a dragon-themed warlock, for example, you could play an archfey warlock whose patron is a moonstone dragon, a new kind of dragon that’s tied to the Feywild. If you want a dragon cleric, you can take any domain and worship Bahamut or Tiamat to add that dragon flavor. Maybe you’re from Eberron and have a dragonmark. Or you might decide that you gained your powers when you found a dragon claw that you now use as your spellcasting focus.”

Chapter Two

“The second chapter contains a handful of new spells, most of which we previewed in Unearthed Arcana. It also contains new magic items that have ties to dragons.

“If DMs and players really embrace this book then they’re going to be seeing a lot of dragons in their campaigns. One new concept we introduce here is hoard items. These are magic items that become more powerful when they’re steeped in a dragon’s hoard.

“If you find an item in a blue wyrmling’s hoard, for example, and then several levels later you use that item to kill an adult red dragon and you steep it in that hoard, it may become more powerful because it’s the hoard of an adult dragon. The item might also change its characteristics slightly, because it’s been affected by a red dragon’s magic instead of a blue dragon.”

Chapter Three

“This chapter is aimed at the Dungeon Master and is all about building dragons as unique characters—both in terms of personality and mechanical tweaks. We also look at how you can build encounters, adventures, and entire campaigns around dragons. This includes a whole bunch of tables that are a great way to quickly share a lot of really dense story ideas. We hope that these tiny nuggets spark inspiration in a DM’s brain.

“This is primarily a mainstream D&D book but we do give a very brief nod in the direction of Tarkir, which is Magic: The Gathering‘s dragon world, as well as Dragonlance. We also reference the second edition Council of Wyrms setting, which was another world that was built around dragons.

“The Council of Wyrms was a string of isles that were ruled by a bunch of different dragon clans. Their council gave the setting its name and in Fizban’s Treasury of Dragons we discuss different ways you might build a setting like that with dragons as major players.”

Chapter Four

“In this chapter we focus on lairs and hoards. This book embraces the D&D multiverse and talks about dragons as the quintessential creatures of the material plane. Bahamut and Tiamat created the material plane, so dragon essence is fundamentally tied to it. That explains why when a dragon creates its lair, it becomes a sort of magical nexus as the dragon’s essence seeps into the surrounding area and regional effects are created.

“We include some new regional effects, a couple of new lair actions that are tied to specific lair maps we include in the next chapter, as well as tables to help generate cool and interesting hoards. You’ll find a few other brand-new lair options later in the book, such as when we’re discussing amethyst dragons in Chapter Five and as part of certain monster entries in Chapter Six.”

Chapter Five

“Chapter Five makes up a third of the book and takes an in-depth look at each kind of dragon. By highlighting a dragon’s personality traits, ideals, and other creatures that might associate with them, we help you build a storyline around them.

“One of the guiding principles of this book is show don’t tell. We could simply tell you about the personality of brass dragons, but if we give you a bunch of tables that show you their personality traits and put words into that brass dragon’s mouth, that’s more effective. That might include objects that the brass dragon has a relationship with—maybe it has conversations with a bust of a philosopher that it calls Leonard!

“We also look at alignment. For example, chromatic dragons are typically evil, so can there ever be a good black dragon? The beauty of the word ‘typically’ is that there’s always the possibility. Each entry in this chapter starts with a table of personality traits and a table of ideals. And the final entry on the table of ideals is always something that’s dramatically outside the norm for that dragon’s alignment as we wanted to make the point that typically does mean typically, not always.”

Chapter Six

“This is the bestiary chapter, which makes up almost a third of the book. A revised version of the sapphire dragon is listed here, alongside the rest of the gem dragon family: amethyst, crystal, emerald, and topaz. It also includes stats for deep dragons, and moonstone dragons, as well as dragonborn champions, humanoid dragon servitors, and various other dragon-adjacent creatures. We also include stats for aspects of Bahamut and Tiamat.

“I have a fondness for dragon turtles and we’ve included additional age categories for those creatures. The dragon turtle in the Monster Manual breaks the pattern for size categories because it’s one size larger than an adult dragon. We’ve decided that’s an adult dragon turtle and have created some younger version scaled down from that. But the ancient dragon turtle is a monster.

“We’ve also included chromatic, metallic, and gem versions of what we call greatwyrm dragons. These creatures use the mythic monster rules from Mythic Odysseys of Theros to create epic battles. And the ancient dragon turtle is also in that category.”
 
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Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Winninger never.saod they were taking a break from. MtG crossovers, he just said that the two Classic Settings, one returning Setting, and two all-new Settings weren't Magic relates. If they do ten books.between 2022 and 2023, that still leaves room for a Magic tie-in or two.

I am a little doubtful we are getting settings than the two classics in 2022... three setting books in a year seems like product saturation.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I didn't want to sound like I dislike this direction. I love the idea that all true dragons seem to have the potential to be god-like. It reminds me of the Dragon Ascendant from the 3.5 Draconomicon. I just have a bit of a hard time seeing Null, the dragon god of death and Undead, or Sardior the god of gem dragons as just Great Wyrms is all.

I don't know, I might just need time and more info to help wrap my head around it is all.
Yeah. I'm going change it if it ends up being that way. Great Wyrms will just have NEARLY godlike power, while the Dragon gods will still be Dragon Gods.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I am a little doubtful we are getting settings than the two classics in 2022... three setting books in a year seems like product saturation.
Somewhat depends on what the product is: Ravenloft is pretty different from Strixhaven. We do know that we are now on a five book a year schedule, with Perkins, Crawford, Wyatt, Hamon, and Schneider each being a project lead for a book moving forward. So far for next year what we know is that Perkins is heading up one of the Classic Settings, but those other four are going to have irons in the fire. And what have all five project leads worked on in major ways? Settings. Sufficiently distinct Settings, done in this 5E style, might work just fine. 0lanescape, Dark Sun, and Kamigawa (as an example) would not feel overly repetitive.
 



Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Somewhat depends on what the product is: Ravenloft is pretty different from Strixhaven. We do know that we are now on a five book a year schedule, with Perkins, Crawford, Wyatt, Hamon, and Schneider each being a project lead for a book moving forward. So far for next year what we know is that Perkins is heading up one of the Classic Settings, but those other four are going to have irons in the fire. And what have all five project leads worked on in major ways? Settings. Sufficiently distinct Settings, done in this 5E style, might work just fine. 0lanescape, Dark Sun, and Kamigawa (as an example) would not feel overly repetitive.

Do we actually know that there is a five-book schedule going forward? I don't remember reading that was a permanent thing.

Anyway, I do feel that other folks in WotC (marketing, sales, finance) may push back on releasing 3 settings from a business perspective and instead want a more diverse release schedule. I think the more likely release schedule will be more like this year, two adventure books, two settings, and some rules with setting-agnostic lore book (Fizban's or Tasha's model).

Three settings just feels like a lot in a very short time, even if they're all distinct.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Do we actually know that there is a five-book schedule going forward? I don't remember reading that was a permanent thing.

Anyway, I do feel that other folks in WotC (marketing, sales, finance) may push back on releasing 3 settings from a business perspective and instead want a more diverse release schedule. I think the more likely release schedule will be more like this year, two adventure books, two settings, and some rules with setting-agnostic lore book (Fizban's or Tasha's model).

Three settings just feels like a lot in a very short time, even if they're all distinct.
Well, they have five Product Leads, so five a year seems to be the pattern. IF you look at theback half of this year, hoever, Beyond the WItchlight, Fizban's, and Strixhaven seem to be breaking down the book catagories. Fizban has strong Setting material (Meta-Setting), Witchlight has a lot of Setting info, and Strixhaven has a Level 1-10 Campaign. We may be looking at more category breaks in the future.
 

I am a little doubtful we are getting settings than the two classics in 2022... three setting books in a year seems like product saturation.

Setting books hit so many notes, player options, dm options, lore, new game mechanics, monsters, etc..., and are isolated from the general game, that I don't see a setting books limit, rather I see them publishing them as they become ready. Given they only have so many project leads, and that its reasonable to expect 1 project will be next years "Summer" in the Autumn adventure, that's six projects they are working on, that doesn't leave much room for other projects right now.

I'm actually expecting next year to be the year ofthe settings for D&D with at minimum the 2 classic setting books, but more likely 3 or four setting books, if they are really productive and none get dumped, all 5 setting books. Thing about it, working on no less 5 setting books at once, all of which are going great, plus the autumn 2021 books, sucks alot of the resources out of the room for other projects, especially when they likely have to be working on a Summer Adventure as well.
 

Somewhat depends on what the product is: Ravenloft is pretty different from Strixhaven. We do know that we are now on a five book a year schedule, with Perkins, Crawford, Wyatt, Hamon, and Schneider each being a project lead for a book moving forward. So far for next year what we know is that Perkins is heading up one of the Classic Settings, but those other four are going to have irons in the fire. And what have all five project leads worked on in major ways? Settings. Sufficiently distinct Settings, done in this 5E style, might work just fine. 0lanescape, Dark Sun, and Kamigawa (as an example) would not feel overly repetitive.

They are training more leads, but I don't expect they will be ready to start leading projects until 2022.

Fizban's also have the first 5e lore on Tarkir and Council of Wyrms.

When the setting book's adventure is levels 1-10 & 1 playable race vs the Advenure's 1-8 levels and 2 races and its introducing its own setting, the lines are beyond blurry now.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
They are training more leads, but I don't expect they will be ready to start leading projects until 2022.

Fizban's also have the first 5e lore on Tarkir and Council of Wyrms.
Right, but the five Settings Winninger mentioned aren't necessarily for next year: it sounded like maybe two of them were, and the other three were on the drawing board.
 

Right, but the five Settings Winninger mentioned aren't necessarily for next year: it sounded like maybe two of them were, and the other three were on the drawing board.

The other 3 were advanced enough that he could confediantly say they were going great, so they aren't so advanced they are in the safe zone, but far enough beyond the drawing board that there was enough work done on them to make an assessment of the work itself. By D&D Celebration we might might get an update on these projects.
 

Kannik

Adventurer
Never seen it. And after looking up some reviews for it, I'm not sure if I want to see it.
If you want some fun easter eggs about Bagua and Xing Yi and seeing them used in the lore, it can be a treat to watch. Once. Ditto if you want to watch something that's a bit gonzo/over the top (though alas not having as much fun with it as they should), plus watching Jet Li battle Jet Li.

And that's about it (at least, to my memory -- who knows, maybe I should watch it again ;) )
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Well, they have five Product Leads, so five a year seems to be the pattern. IF you look at theback half of this year, hoever, Beyond the WItchlight, Fizban's, and Strixhaven seem to be breaking down the book catagories. Fizban has strong Setting material (Meta-Setting), Witchlight has a lot of Setting info, and Strixhaven has a Level 1-10 Campaign. We may be looking at more category breaks in the future.
Setting books hit so many notes, player options, dm options, lore, new game mechanics, monsters, etc..., and are isolated from the general game, that I don't see a setting books limit, rather I see them publishing them as they become ready. Given they only have so many project leads, and that its reasonable to expect 1 project will be next years "Summer" in the Autumn adventure, that's six projects they are working on, that doesn't leave much room for other projects right now.

I'm actually expecting next year to be the year ofthe settings for D&D with at minimum the 2 classic setting books, but more likely 3 or four setting books, if they are really productive and none get dumped, all 5 setting books. Thing about it, working on no less 5 setting books at once, all of which are going great, plus the autumn 2021 books, sucks alot of the resources out of the room for other projects, especially when they likely have to be working on a Summer Adventure as well.

Yeah, when they released four books in 2018, I remember that everyone thought that meant four books would be the pattern go forward. But the next year, there were three books and one box. Then it went to four books in 2020. So I don't know if we can say for sure that WotC is prepared to make 5 books per year consistently, though they may be.

And I do agree that they're exploring more formats (they've said they are), but they do still have some categorization, as they still call Strixhaven a setting despite it's large adventure for example. I think part of the categorization breakdown is the team is having a little bit of trouble adding new rules to the game that pass popular muster, the case with Strixhaven's subclasses (which is why it needs such a big adventure segment, to fill pages).

Anyway, I think the WotC team has certainly made setting books a big part of future plans, however I don't think making more than 50% of your future releases settings is a step they'll take. It crowds out other types of books like generic books (Fizban, Tasha's, Xanathar's) and also non-annual adventures (Ghosts of Saltmarsh, Candlekeep).

I do agree however the "Revisited Setting" may be primarily an adventure, so straddle the two quite a lot.

I definitely don't think they're prepared for 6 books next year, though I'm hopeful 5 is again possible.
 

Yeah, when they released four books in 2018, I remember that everyone thought that meant four books would be the pattern go forward. But the next year, there were three books and one box. Then it went to four books in 2020. So I don't know if we can say for sure that WotC is prepared to make 5 books per year consistently, though they may be.

And I do agree that they're exploring more formats (they've said they are), but they do still have some categorization, as they still call Strixhaven a setting despite it's large adventure for example. I think part of the categorization breakdown is the team is having a little bit of trouble adding new rules to the game that pass popular muster, the case with Strixhaven's subclasses (which is why it needs such a big adventure segment, to fill pages).

Anyway, I think the WotC team has certainly made setting books a big part of future plans, however I don't think making more than 50% of your future releases settings is a step they'll take. It crowds out other types of books like generic books (Fizban, Tasha's, Xanathar's) and also non-annual adventures (Ghosts of Saltmarsh, Candlekeep).

I do agree however the "Revisited Setting" may be primarily an adventure, so straddle the two quite a lot.

I definitely don't think they're prepared for 6 books next year, though I'm hopeful 5 is again possible.

I don't think the big adventure is because they couldn't fill the space, although compared to other MtG settings Arcavios is very unexplored, only 1 set and most of it set in Strixhaven. No I think they wanted this book to be focused on the school, self contained and addible to any settong, so they gave it a big adventure.

And it doesn't mean every year with be 50-80% setting books, just that next year is likely to be as they play catch up. They don't like doing Tasha or Fizban style books too often as they can be more disruptive to the general game then setting books are.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Yeah, when they released four books in 2018, I remember that everyone thought that meant four books would be the pattern go forward. But the next year, there were three books and one box. Then it went to four books in 2020. So I don't know if we can say for sure that WotC is prepared to make 5 books per year consistently, though they may be.

And I do agree that they're exploring more formats (they've said they are), but they do still have some categorization, as they still call Strixhaven a setting despite it's large adventure for example. I think part of the categorization breakdown is the team is having a little bit of trouble adding new rules to the game that pass popular muster, the case with Strixhaven's subclasses (which is why it needs such a big adventure segment, to fill pages).

Anyway, I think the WotC team has certainly made setting books a big part of future plans, however I don't think making more than 50% of your future releases settings is a step they'll take. It crowds out other types of books like generic books (Fizban, Tasha's, Xanathar's) and also non-annual adventures (Ghosts of Saltmarsh, Candlekeep).

I do agree however the "Revisited Setting" may be primarily an adventure, so straddle the two quite a lot.

I definitely don't think they're prepared for 6 books next year, though I'm hopeful 5 is again possible.
The Subclasses are only a few pages, whereas 4 modules that take players to Level 10 would have had to be in the works by then, and would have much more of a page count. I bet that the Feats end up being many of the same abilities the Subclasses had, broken out piecemeal.

The mechanical output is definitely slow now: bold new creative content is what they seem to be focusing on, mechanics as needed.
 

Dungeonosophy

Adventurer
Council of Wyrms probably counts, even though it's just a one-off. But I wonder where WotC draws the line? How about the Jakandor books, or the "mini" settings in various modules? Thunder Rift?

I'd guess if you placed the Io's Blood Isles or Jackandor or Thunder Rift or Ghostwalk on the map of Faerun or Eberron, it might (probably would) fly in DMsGuild, since those products were explicitly stated to be addable to any campaign world.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I don't think the big adventure is because they couldn't fill the space, although compared to other MtG settings Arcavios is very unexplored, only 1 set and most of it set in Strixhaven. No I think they wanted this book to be focused on the school, self contained and addible to any settong, so they gave it a big adventure.

And it doesn't mean every year with be 50-80% setting books, just that next year is likely to be as they play catch up. They don't like doing Tasha or Fizban style books too often as they can be more disruptive to the general game then setting books are.
The Subclasses are only a few pages, whereas 4 modules that take players to Level 10 would have had to be in the works by then, and would have much more of a page count. I bet that the Feats end up being many of the same abilities the Subclasses had, broken out piecemeal.

The mechanical output is definitely slow now: bold new creative content is what they seem to be focusing on, mechanics as needed.

Yeah you're probably right, the big adventure was probably always written. I do think it is indicative of the team having some struggle with putting non-adventure material in Strixhaven if they felt they needed to put such a large adventure in.

And they do about one "generic" non-adventure book every year, and I believe 2019 is the only year that didn't have one. It makes sense that there will be one every year going forward, especially if we are on a 5 book schedule; a lot of folks here prefer those books above others.

Two settings, two adventures (one the big adventure, the other more of a compilation/remake format), and one generic book (either rules focused like Tasha's/Xanathar's or monsters focused like Volo's/Fizban's) seems like the most logical format going format, even if setting incorporate more setting material and vice-versa.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Yeah you're probably right, the big adventure was probably always written. I do think it is indicative of the team having some struggle with putting non-adventure material in Strixhaven if they felt they needed to put such a large adventure in.

And they do about one "generic" non-adventure book every year, and I believe 2019 is the only year that didn't have one. It makes sense that there will be one every year going forward, especially if we are on a 5 book schedule; a lot of folks here prefer those books above others.

Two settings, two adventures (one the big adventure, the other more of a compilation/remake format), and one generic book (either rules focused like Tasha's/Xanathar's or monsters focused like Volo's/Fizban's) seems like the most logical format going format, even if setting incorporate more setting material and vice-versa.
I think they made such a large Adventure because the Plane Strixhaven is located on, Arcavios, is very lightly detailed: easier to hyperfocus on Strixhaven proper and make a College Campaign supplement with a big Adventure.

They could go just about any direction moving forwards, as Winninger puts his stamp on the product line.
 

dave2008

Legend
They said that they were going to have stats for Tiamat and Bahamut in this book, but that makes me wonder if they're going to have them for Sardior. I sure hope they do . . .
Stats for the Aspects of Tiamat and Bahamut. I was hoping we were going to get mythic versions of Tiamat and Bahamut, but I guess not. :mad:
 

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