D&D 5E Greyhawk: Player Options for a Campaign Setting

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Greyhawk is D&D before people thought they needed to color within the lines. Greyhawk is D&D your way. It's the infinite multiverse and crashed spaceships, it's ninja nazi monks and demon-possessed emperors, it's endless black ice and dead civilizations blasted by colorless fire.

It's a mechanical bejeweled songbird from two millennia ago with powers that amaze and terrify, and an ancient computer designed by a long-ago Baron driven insane by his creation. It's a dark nameless god dreaming within a crystalline cyst, and demi-gods raised from the ranks of mere mortal adventurers.


It's a land that contains both the hospitable and brave free people of the Yeomanry who regularly elect their leaders from amongst their ranks, as well as the infamy of Vlek, the Stonefist, who acquired power through the slaughter of the Coltens Feodality under cover of negotiation.


I have often made the case for Greyhawk, but as we come up on the 50th Anniversary of D&D (1974 - 2024), I think that it is a no-brainer for WoTC to re-visit the setting. When you have an anniversary that allows a celebration of the past, it would seem a natural fit to update and release the OG of official campaign settings. Not to mention the basis for a lot of the lore we have seen recently; after all, Vecna, Mordenkainen, Tasha ... all have their roots in Greyhawk.

But while I have spilled some words (for large amounts of "some") discussing Greyhawk in general in the past, today I wanted to concentrate on a more narrow issue- given that WoTC always releases campaign settings that have player-facing options in order to increase sales, what player-facing options would a revised Greyhawk setting have?

....and, honestly, this is an area that I struggle with. Because Greyhawk was the original campaign setting, a lot of things that we take for granted were introduced for play during the Greyhawk era, but are now part of the regular game. For example, I don't think "Drow" would be a big selling point. Other things just couldn't be (or shouldn't be) done- Greyhawk had a rich description of the various waves of human settlers/colonizers/invaders to the Flanaess (Oerdian, Suel, Baklunish, Flannae etc.), but D&D has rightfully avoided any mechanical differentiation in humans.

I am also not interested in either more varieties of Elves (although people can post them in the comments) or in listing things that have been covered elsewhere but are present in Greyhawk (Centaurs, Bugbears, etc.).

With that in mind, I am going to throw out a few ideas and then see if others have a few of their own for player-facing options for Greyhawk-

A. Scarlet Brotherhood Monks. This one is the easiest. Maybe too easy. Obviously, the monks of Greyhawk are a little different- the whole Nazi thing. Which maybe makes them not as appealing a player option ... while you can always Drizzt it up (the PC is someone who is against the prevailing power structure, etc.) you may want to leave this whole area as "Villain/NPC only."

B. Tiefling/Cambion. Yes, Tieflings are technically related to (descendants of, bloodline curse, etc.) ....fiends, which means either devil or demon. But other than IIRC a UA, the TIeflings to date in 5e have had a distinct devilish tilt. Either through a pact with Asmodeum or in MTOF other Archdevils. The one thing that Greyhawk has ... is demons. Grazzt. Iuz has had a presence and a country. Let's have some demon-centric options.

C. Aliens/Vegepygmies. Maybe it's time for some more plant-based PCs? The original alien life form was the vegepygmy, in Barrier Peaks. Maybe you don't want to go "full robot" but you could certainly introduce some of the old classics as PC options.

D. Valley Elf. Ugh, no. Gag me with a spoon.

E. Return of the Old? This might be too stupid (or too clever), but maybe have variant classes that reflect the oldest AD&D classes that we no longer have. An illusionist that isn't just a pale Wizard subclass, but a REAL ILLUSIONIST. A ranger option that skews heavily toward the old Aragorn/strider model (a Fighter Subclass, loosely based off of Eldritch Knight but with druid spells, maybe).

F. Gary, expanded. A jester? A mountebank? An acrobat/thief? A savant? A mystic (no, sorry ... not that one, psionics fans)? There were ideas for expansions to the classes by Gygax that were introduced just prior to his departure, or were planned for afterwards. Obviously, the biggest issue is that several of these (jester, mountebank) might be bard-adjacent.

G. Deity-specific subclasses, bonuses, or feats. Not just for clerics anymore! From OD&D through Dragon #283 (and beyond!), Greyhawk has had a rich tradition of providing bonuses for believers, clerics, or followers of certain deities. The pantheon of Greyhawk is bizarre, and fun, and whether you're a Shining Blade of Heironeous or a Theocrat of Pholtus, there is something for you here.

H. Good artifacts make good artificers. Whether you're in the Yeomanry or Irongate, and regardless of whether you've excavated the Sea of Dust for forgotten technology of lost empires or found alien technology in the high mountains, there is something for all artificers within Greyhawk. Just don't go mad with the implications of what you are building ....

I. Knights, knights, and more knights. Whether you're the Watch, Luna, or the Hart ... there are Knights of Orders a plenty in Greyhawk.


Anyway, there are some seed ideas. I am sure that there are people here who could come up with more! And I'd love to see them.

So let me ask- if you were releasing a New Greyhawk Campaign Setting, what player-facing options would you include? And what player-facing options would you like to see?
 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Greyhawk is D&D before people thought they needed to color within the lines. Greyhawk is D&D your way. It's the infinite multiverse and crashed spaceships, it's ninja nazi monks and demon-possessed emperors, it's endless black ice and dead civilizations blasted by colorless fire.

It's a mechanical bejeweled songbird from two millennia ago with powers that amaze and terrify, and an ancient computer designed by a long-ago Baron driven insane by his creation. It's a dark nameless god dreaming within a crystalline cyst, and demi-gods raised from the ranks of mere mortal adventurers.


It's a land that contains both the hospitable and brave free people of the Yeomanry who regularly elect their leaders from amongst their ranks, as well as the infamy of Vlek, the Stonefist, who acquired power through the slaughter of the Coltens Feodality under cover of negotiation.


I have often made the case for Greyhawk, but as we come up on the 50th Anniversary of D&D (1974 - 2024), I think that it is a no-brainer for WoTC to re-visit the setting. When you have an anniversary that allows a celebration of the past, it would seem a natural fit to update and release the OG of official campaign settings. Not to mention the basis for a lot of the lore we have seen recently; after all, Vecna, Mordenkainen, Tasha ... all have their roots in Greyhawk.

But while I have spilled some words (for large amounts of "some") discussing Greyhawk in general in the past, today I wanted to concentrate on a more narrow issue- given that WoTC always releases campaign settings that have player-facing options in order to increase sales, what player-facing options would a revised Greyhawk setting have?

....and, honestly, this is an area that I struggle with. Because Greyhawk was the original campaign setting, a lot of things that we take for granted were introduced for play during the Greyhawk era, but are now part of the regular game. For example, I don't think "Drow" would be a big selling point. Other things just couldn't be (or shouldn't be) done- Greyhawk had a rich description of the various waves of human settlers/colonizers/invaders to the Flanaess (Oerdian, Suel, Baklunish, Flannae etc.), but D&D has rightfully avoided any mechanical differentiation in humans.

I am also not interested in either more varieties of Elves (although people can post them in the comments) or in listing things that have been covered elsewhere but are present in Greyhawk (Centaurs, Bugbears, etc.).

With that in mind, I am going to throw out a few ideas and then see if others have a few of their own for player-facing options for Greyhawk-

A. Scarlet Brotherhood Monks. This one is the easiest. Maybe too easy. Obviously, the monks of Greyhawk are a little different- the whole Nazi thing. Which maybe makes them not as appealing a player option ... while you can always Drizzt it up (the PC is someone who is against the prevailing power structure, etc.) you may want to leave this whole area as "Villain/NPC only."

B. Tiefling/Cambion. Yes, Tieflings are technically related to (descendants of, bloodline curse, etc.) ....fiends, which means either devil or demon. But other than IIRC a UA, the TIeflings to date in 5e have had a distinct devilish tilt. Either through a pact with Asmodeum or in MTOF other Archdevils. The one thing that Greyhawk has ... is demons. Grazzt. Iuz has had a presence and a country. Let's have some demon-centric options.

C. Aliens/Vegepygmies. Maybe it's time for some more plant-based PCs? The original alien life form was the vegepygmy, in Barrier Peaks. Maybe you don't want to go "full robot" but you could certainly introduce some of the old classics as PC options.

D. Valley Elf. Ugh, no. Gag me with a spoon.

E. Return of the Old? This might be too stupid (or too clever), but maybe have variant classes that reflect the oldest AD&D classes that we no longer have. An illusionist that isn't just a pale Wizard subclass, but a REAL ILLUSIONIST. A ranger option that skews heavily toward the old Aragorn/strider model (a Fighter Subclass, loosely based off of Arcane Knight but with druid spells, maybe).

F. Gary, expanded. A jester? A mountebank? An acrobat/thief? A savant? A mystic (no, sorry ... not that one, psionics fans)? There were ideas for expansions to the classes by Gygax that were introduced just prior to his departure, or were planned for afterwards. Obviously, the biggest issue is that several of these (jester, mountebank) might be bard-adjacent.

G. Deity-specific subclasses, bonuses, or feats. Not just for clerics anymore! From OD&D through Dragon #283 (and beyond!), Greyhawk has had a rich tradition of providing bonuses for believers, clerics, or followers of certain deities. The pantheon of Greyhawk is bizarre, and fun, and whether you're a Shining Blade of Heironeous or a Theocrat of Pholtus, there is something for you here.

H. Good artifacts make good artificers. Whether you're in the Yeomanry or Irongate, and regardless of whether you've excavated the Sea of Dust for forgotten technology of lost empires or found alien technology in the high mountains, there is something for all artificers within Greyhawk. Just don't go mad with the implications of what you are building ....

I. Knights, knights, and more knights. Whether you're the Watch, Luna, or the Hart ... there are Knights of Orders a plenty in Greyhawk.


Anyway, there are some seed ideas. I am sure that there are people here who could come up with more! And I'd love to see them.

So let me ask- if you were releasing a New Greyhawk Campaign Setting, what player-facing options would you include? And what player-facing options would you like to see?
I would love to see the Pomarj fleshed out more. I mean, an empire of non-humans ripe for a party consisting of an orc, goblin, bugbear and half-orc to adventure in. See society from a different view point. How cool would that be.
 




Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Like gag me with a Bohemian earspoon

North of Geoff, South of Ket,
By the River Javan wet,
Living with the stubby gnomes,
The Valley Elves do make their homes ...

Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf, Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf . . .
So cool, so fair,
With chartreuse hair, So young, secure --

“Fer sure, fer sure,
like, oh, man, I was really down today,
like, sooo down,
I almost flunked archery today,
I was blitzed totally, it was
wrong. Like, I wore my elven cloak
into the dungeon, y’know, and it got all
grody with, wow, Iike
spider webs and green slime all over it,
like yucko, like
when I saw it when we got out I thought, oh,
gag me with a wand,
it was grody to the max, just psionic, like,
and I had to clean it, oh,
gross me out, man.
Totally awesome. I hate to go in dungeons,
they are so rank, and some of the monsters just like freak me out, man, like wow.
I even saw a fer real monster, like real close up once, and it was really, like, totally
disgusting, barf city man, it was so gross
that I thought, like, Hey, keep away from me, man! Like no way I’m gonna ever even use my sword
on you, I just waxed it, y’know, like
gag me with a mace.”

Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf, Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf . . .

North of Geoff, South of Ket,
By the River Javan wet,
Living with the stubby gnomes,
The Valley Elves do make their homes,

“Sure, totally, y’know, I had a dog, man,
a cooshee, like he was special,
a Gucci cooshee poochie,
he had designer genes, like, really rare,
he was just awesome, but not too housebroken.
I had to clean up after him, and that was like grody, just gross to the max, but, wow,
like, no biggie, cuz he was my
dog, y’know, but he’s gone now, totally, see,
I met-the mage the other day, and, wow, man,
the mage has got like no,
totally no sense of humor. Like, I made a joke, y’know, I thought it was super,
like, I saw the mage and said like, hey,
we’re in the Valley of the Jolly,
like, Ho Ho Ho, Green Valley Mage,
just like the freakin’ commercials,
but he just looked at me, like wow,
he must have really been out of it, man,
like he was so out of it he threw
one of those, like, meteor swarms at me, it was just awesome, I mean it was just, oh wow man, it was astral, and it missed me and hit my dog,
my designer dog, like,
crispy critter city,
I was really bummed out, really bad like.”
 

North of Geoff, South of Ket,
By the River Javan wet,
Living with the stubby gnomes,
The Valley Elves do make their homes ...

Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf, Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf . . .
So cool, so fair,
With chartreuse hair, So young, secure --

“Fer sure, fer sure,
like, oh, man, I was really down today,
like, sooo down,
I almost flunked archery today,
I was blitzed totally, it was
wrong. Like, I wore my elven cloak
into the dungeon, y’know, and it got all
grody with, wow, Iike
spider webs and green slime all over it,
like yucko, like
when I saw it when we got out I thought, oh,
gag me with a wand,
it was grody to the max, just psionic, like,
and I had to clean it, oh,
gross me out, man.
Totally awesome. I hate to go in dungeons,
they are so rank, and some of the monsters just like freak me out, man, like wow.
I even saw a fer real monster, like real close up once, and it was really, like, totally
disgusting, barf city man, it was so gross
that I thought, like, Hey, keep away from me, man! Like no way I’m gonna ever even use my sword
on you, I just waxed it, y’know, like
gag me with a mace.”

Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf, Valley Elf,
He’s a Valley Elf . . .

North of Geoff, South of Ket,
By the River Javan wet,
Living with the stubby gnomes,
The Valley Elves do make their homes,

“Sure, totally, y’know, I had a dog, man,
a cooshee, like he was special,
a Gucci cooshee poochie,
he had designer genes, like, really rare,
he was just awesome, but not too housebroken.
I had to clean up after him, and that was like grody, just gross to the max, but, wow,
like, no biggie, cuz he was my
dog, y’know, but he’s gone now, totally, see,
I met-the mage the other day, and, wow, man,
the mage has got like no,
totally no sense of humor. Like, I made a joke, y’know, I thought it was super,
like, I saw the mage and said like, hey,
we’re in the Valley of the Jolly,
like, Ho Ho Ho, Green Valley Mage,
just like the freakin’ commercials,
but he just looked at me, like wow,
he must have really been out of it, man,
like he was so out of it he threw
one of those, like, meteor swarms at me, it was just awesome, I mean it was just, oh wow man, it was astral, and it missed me and hit my dog,
my designer dog, like,
crispy critter city,
I was really bummed out, really bad like.”
Those Dragon magazine articles where they would do song parodies (I think they were April Fools editions) were so great. I still remember the one where they did the entire Dragonlance series set to "Bohemian Rhapsody".
 

AdmundfortGeographer

Getting lost in fantasy maps
B. Tiefling/Cambion. Yes, Tieflings are technically related to (descendants of, bloodline curse, etc.) ....fiends, which means either devil or demon. But other than IIRC a UA, the TIeflings to date in 5e have had a distinct devilish tilt. Either through a pact with Asmodeum or in MTOF other Archdevils. The one thing that Greyhawk has ... is demons. Grazzt. Iuz has had a presence and a country. Let's have some demon-centric options.
There is also room when considering the details of the Great Kingdom’s final years and the frequent flirtations with lower planar creatures.

G. Deity-specific subclasses, bonuses, or feats. Not just for clerics anymore! From OD&D through Dragon #283 (and beyond!), Greyhawk has had a rich tradition of providing bonuses for believers, clerics, or followers of certain deities. The pantheon of Greyhawk is bizarre, and fun, and whether you're a Shining Blade of Heironeous or a Theocrat of Pholtus, there is something for you here.
And with hero deities popping up all over, it’s a reasonable place for ascension rules.
 

GuyBoy

Hero
Not sure about setting options, but I’d love to see a relaunched Greyhawk setting accompanied by a mega-adventure based around Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth and Temple of Tharizdun, with new material interfacing with the classic modules.
I like the idea by @Maxperson of developing The Pomarj as an area to play non-human cultures.
A full illusionist would also be great.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
There is also room when considering the details of the Great Kingdom’s final years and the frequent flirtations with lower planar creatures.


And with hero deities popping up all over, it’s a reasonable place for ascension rules.

What is level 21?

DEMI-GOD.

Yeah, that was always the best end-game .... I'd love to see some ascension rules.

The best retirement is the DEMI-GOD retirement after all!
 

Player facing options are tricky for Greyhawk, since most likely the campaign would be best by limiting options, rather than introducing new ones. Demonic and Daemonic based tiefling options would be pretty cool, even though I'm not generally a fan of tieflings. A gestalt style multiclass option would be nice, fitting into the original AD&D multiclass setup. Rules for running a stronghold is more DM facing, but still something players might be interested in.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Not sure about setting options, but I’d love to see a relaunched Greyhawk setting accompanied by a mega-adventure based around Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth and Temple of Tharizdun, with new material interfacing with the classic modules.
I like the idea by @Maxperson of developing The Pomarj as an area to play non-human cultures.
A full illusionist would also be great.
The Lost Caverns are still one of my all time favorite modules. I'd love to see that happen.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Player facing options are tricky for Greyhawk, since most likely the campaign would be best by limiting options, rather than introducing new ones. Demonic and Daemonic based tiefling options would be pretty cool, even though I'm not generally a fan of tieflings. A gestalt style multiclass option would be nice, fitting into the original AD&D multiclass setup. Rules for running a stronghold is more DM facing, but still something players might be interested in.

So ... while I agree with this in principle (re: limiting options), I have really evolved on this in practice.

Players today don't want their options limited. They just ... don't. So instead of trying (and, IMO, probably failing) to make that a selling point of the setting, I would probably have a sidebar, or a page, explaining what options are common, what are rare, and what would be "one-offs" (options that would be remarkable, or 'gated in' from other planes, etc.).
 

Jer

Legend
Supporter
Players today don't want their options limited. They just ... don't.
I actually am amused/intrigued by your idea of having reworked classes or subclasses that make the current classes "feel" more like their older counterparts. That can be one way to limit options actually - the one way to limit options in a campaign that generally works is when the whole table buys into the premise that playing in that limited space is something they want to do.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Greyhawk is D&D before people thought they needed to color within the lines. Greyhawk is D&D your way.

....

So let me ask- if you were releasing a New Greyhawk Campaign Setting, what player-facing options would you include? And what player-facing options would you like to see?

So, I find the beginning and end to be in conflict. If there's no need to color within the lines, and id D&D MY way... why do I need/want a published setting - which is a set of lines to color within, and someone else's way?

I think this conflict is natural for Greyhawk, as the game has developed and changed considerably since the setting first appeared. But it does seem really strange to consider publishing a modern campaign setting when the modern forms run against the original approach to the setting.
 

Yaarel

Mind Mage
Things that I like from the Greyhawk setting:

Backgrounds!

Different cultures did weird stuff. Now in 5e, these are backgrounds. Backgrounds grant relevant skills, but they also grant what I call a "noncombat special asset". The asset can be anything, including magical abilities, like knowing certain spells or rituals, crafting a certain kind of magic item, or doing some nonspell magical effect. Some backgrounds are magical backgrounds. Now, it seems, backgrounds can even correlate with a powerful feat.

Backgrounds can be peculiar to a specific culture. The choice of a background grants a personal connection to that culture and even a role within that culture.



In the Greyhawk setting, elves divide into many cultures.

Eladrin cultural backgrounds: Faerie culture, Grey culture, and Valley culture.
Translating into 5e, the 1e MM grey elf with faerie elf are something like the Eladrin splitting up into a Faerie culture of Wizards in the fey plane versus a Grey culture of Eldritch Knights in the material plane. Little is mentioned about the Faerie, except they are powerful Wizards of keen intellects. Perhaps they are the same as the 5e eladrin with its seasonal fey culture, but emphasizing fey universities of magic, arcane sciences, and sacred Bards heading bardic colleges? The Grey are a military culture specializing in magical warrior with central institutions of Bladesinger Wizards and Eldritch Knights. Grey Eladrin raise griffons! Imagine 5e Eldritch Knights riding flying griffon mounts. There has to be a way that a background allow player characters to do this, in a balanced way, even at level 1. A character with this Grey cultural background grew up with griffons. Some raise hippogriffs, magically hybriding the griffon with horses for speed. Likewise, there can be a background specializing in making the famous elven mithril chainmail. (In my games, the "elven chain" is actually an always-on Arcane Armor spell-like ability, that traditionally appears as if a silky fine chain mesh, but can appear as any form of armor or clothing or aura of light, whatever the its wearer wishes.) The elven chain background can grant this special use of the Arcane Armor, perhaps even allow a teammate to enjoy elven chain temporarily. An other background might relate to making special longswords that agily allow finesse to benefit from Dexterity, and a different background that can make a magical longsword that as part of a cantrip can substitute the casting ability instead of Strength. The Valley Eladrin are a political culture relating to the Valley of the Mage and its magocracy. Gnomes are also part of this culture. The Valley nationals resemble the Grey culture, but ride horses − one background − rather than griffons, and often have the cooshee fairy dog as a magical pet − an other background.

Drow cultural backgrounds: Aeven culture and Uda culture.
In my eyes, the Drow description in the 1e MM is who we now call Aevendrow, of the Aeven culture. They are a culture of Wizards, who enjoy magical luxuries. A background can include magical tailor, using cantrips to fashion clothes, and weaving magic items. Another is a food server of impossibly delicious magical foods. The Lolth Drow from the Gygax dungeon modules and the Fiend Folio are the Uda culture, of course, with many backgrounds ranging from a maker of sleep poison, to a raiser of giant spiders. A player character should know how to make and use sleep poison.

Wood cultural backgrounds: Sylvan culture and Grugach culture.
The Sylvan elves tend to value and make prominent the Fighters and Rangers, who celebrate spear and bow. There can Sylvan background to have a lynx pet! An other background can raise giant owls. An other Sylvan background can speak with animals, and make sure there is a mutually constructive arrangement between the Sylvan community and the various animal communities. Meanwhile, the Grugach cultures are nomadic, traveling in extended families within the remote forest wildernesses. They especially revere the sacred traditions of their Druids, a background, that shuns arcane magic traditions. The culture values extreme Strength as well as gymnastic stunts across tree limbs. Fighters, Rangers, Barbarians, and similar specialists in physical prowess enjoy high esteem. A family warrior is a background. A trapper is a background, making snares and other traps that are difficult to detect. They ride deer as their mounts, an other background.

High cultural background: various cultures.
The High elves tend to be the most well-known. High elves often become units in the governments of other races. High culture is known for infusing human warrior traditions with elven magic: Fighter/Cleric − whence for 5e Paladin orders as backgrounds − Fighter/Wizard as Eldritch Knight and its military orders as backgrounds. Blends of Cleric and Wizard are of interest too, including the Arcane Cleric domain, where Corellon is an elven ancestor who promotes magical arts as a sacred tradition. Indigenous High elf communities tend to be in treehouse towns made from living trees. A background can shape living wood, to construct High elf homes. The indigenous communities form friendships with giant eagles, an other background. High elf traditions transmit methods of invisibility for magical stealth. But also the dexterous Stealth of the Rogue is welcome, and perhaps especially the Arcane Trickster. These Rogues are rarely criminal, but venture off on various covert operations.



And so on. These are the elves of the Greyhawk setting. Other races have their own weird and wonderful idiosyncrasies. Each human culture has its own traditions and specializations.

The character design space of a "background", can bring the Greyhawk setting to life.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
And so on. These are the elves of the Greyhawk setting. Other races have their own weird and wonderful idiosyncrasies. Each human culture has its own traditions and specializations.

The character design space of a "background", can bring the Greyhawk setting to life.

there's a special place in hell designed for people that make me give a thumbs-up to an elf post. :)
 


Micah Sweet

Legend
So ... while I agree with this in principle (re: limiting options), I have really evolved on this in practice.

Players today don't want their options limited. They just ... don't. So instead of trying (and, IMO, probably failing) to make that a selling point of the setting, I would probably have a sidebar, or a page, explaining what options are common, what are rare, and what would be "one-offs" (options that would be remarkable, or 'gated in' from other planes, etc.).
Yeah, you can't hard-block options in 5e anymore.
 

Micah Sweet

Legend
So, I find the beginning and end to be in conflict. If there's no need to color within the lines, and id D&D MY way... why do I need/want a published setting - which is a set of lines to color within, and someone else's way?

I think this conflict is natural for Greyhawk, as the game has developed and changed considerably since the setting first appeared. But it does seem really strange to consider publishing a modern campaign setting when the modern forms run against the original approach to the setting.
If they would just release Greyhawk to the DMsguild, I'm sure someone would figure it out.
 

Dungeon Delver's Guide

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top