Healer feat change

ZenBear

Villager
I’m trying to think of interesting ways to make the Healer feat more relevant in the later levels. I’ve considered higher quality healer kits to add more d6s, as well as incorporating various flora that can be scavenged to remedy conditions or provide buffs.


A new idea I just thought of would be to eliminate the healing portion of the feat altogether, keeping the 1 hp stabilize action, and instead allow a use of a kit charge during a short rest to maximize hit dice recovery. This obsoletes the Durable feat, but I never see anyone take that anyway.


Thoughts?
 

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
I think your first idea is the better one but that's mainly because the one with hit dice could be rendered useless after a couple of particularly grueling battles when hit dice are used up.

You could make +1/+2/+3 healer kits with each + adding an additional d6.

Edit: actually, rather than +s, it might be better to use the same terminology as healing potions.
 

dnd4vr

Adventurer
I’m trying to think of interesting ways to make the Healer feat more relevant in the later levels. I’ve considered higher quality healer kits to add more d6s, as well as incorporating various flora that can be scavenged to remedy conditions or provide buffs.


A new idea I just thought of would be to eliminate the healing portion of the feat altogether, keeping the 1 hp stabilize action, and instead allow a use of a kit charge during a short rest to maximize hit dice recovery. This obsoletes the Durable feat, but I never see anyone take that anyway.


Thoughts?
I am curious why you think the Healer Feat is irrelevant at higher levels?

By my estimate, you can use it up to three times a day on each party member, and with a party 15th-level characters your average use is over 22 hit points per character, or more than 67 hit points per day. If you have four party members you can heal, that amounts to an average of 270 hit points a day... for a feat.

In case you're interested, that is equal to about 38 potions of healing, every day, for less than two healing kits.

If the problem is that it doesn't restore enough in a single shot, I think maybe that is by design and at higher levels you should be looking for alternatives to healing via the Healer feat.

All that being said, I think adding more options to what the feat can do ins't a bad idea, but otherwise I fail to see how it lacks relevancy at higher levels.
 

Ashrym

Adventurer
I'm also curious why you think the healer feat needs more relevance. If you are seeing players take it that's generally a sign that it has value. The fact you never see anyone taking Durable would indicate it would be the one to review.
 

ZenBear

Villager
Well to be honest, I’ve always considered it a fantastic feat, but also that it seems to massively drop in value at higher levels. Now that I’m really thinking about it and hearing from y’all, I realize my analysis might be wrong. That being said, the players in my new campaign are pretty adamant that the feat is bad, and the one of them that is brand new to the game was considering it until the others shot the idea down. So, taking advice from here and another forum I posted on, I’ve decided to change the healing value to Xd6+(2xProficiency)+HD, where Xd6 is dependent on the quality of the healer’s kit. This way it doesn’t get any better at low levels when it’s super effective, but maintains its punch later on. I don’t think this is a game breaking buff, and it seems to have satisfied the party. I’ll adjust the difficulty of encounters if it ends up OP.
 

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
I just had a look at the feat, it does scale with level since it heals 1d6+4+the targets max number of hit dice which for players is their character level which means it's a healthy amount of healing for a single charge of a healer kit. I've been thinking all this time that it just healed 1d6+4 hit points.
 

dnd4vr

Adventurer
Well to be honest, I’ve always considered it a fantastic feat, but also that it seems to massively drop in value at higher levels. Now that I’m really thinking about it and hearing from y’all, I realize my analysis might be wrong. That being said, the players in my new campaign are pretty adamant that the feat is bad, and the one of them that is brand new to the game was considering it until the others shot the idea down. So, taking advice from here and another forum I posted on, I’ve decided to change the healing value to Xd6+(2xProficiency)+HD, where Xd6 is dependent on the quality of the healer’s kit. This way it doesn’t get any better at low levels when it’s super effective, but maintains its punch later on. I don’t think this is a game breaking buff, and it seems to have satisfied the party. I’ll adjust the difficulty of encounters if it ends up OP.
Well, I suppose it depends a lot on how much healing your party needs and how your encounters are run. At our table, that would be OP, but it might work for yours. You might want each "use" of the healer's kit to add 1d6 and then with 2x proficiency bonus? Either way, it is a very cheap way to get a lot of healing, even if it is limited to 3 times a day.

I would definitely encourage your players to look at how much this feat can heal and how cheap it is to do it. Is the problem also needing large amounts of healing mid-battle?

Anyway, I'm curious as to how it works out so let us know, ok? :)
 

ZenBear

Villager
I’ll keep you posted, though it will be some time before the scaling takes effect. Thanks again for the feedback everyone!
 

Teulisch

Visitor
healers kit... 5 gold, 3 pounds, 10 uses. default use it to stabalize dying characters. the feat allows for 1d6+4 healing per change (5 to 10, average 7)

in comparison, healing potions are 50gp each, weight half a pound, and heal 2d4+2 (4 to 10, average 7)

so the feat is like 10 healing potions, at 1% of the cost, and at 60% of the weight.

if you have an army, then one medic with this feat and a bunch of kits is a VERY cost effective healer. every human has a feat, so every human army probably has one or more of these guys. sure, you need an hours rest between applying bandages and splints, but thats still a very fast recovery rate (and most low-level troops only need one use). triage means you save the dying first, so you have more guys with 1 hp wandering around camp.

if you wanted to boost this any more, i would suggest adding a way to restore attribute damage, maybe improve the impact of using antitoxin?
 

Ohmyn

Visitor
I’m trying to think of interesting ways to make the Healer feat more relevant in the later levels. I’ve considered higher quality healer kits to add more d6s, as well as incorporating various flora that can be scavenged to remedy conditions or provide buffs.
I think it's important to address why you want to address some of those qualities. If you're looking to remedy conditions, is it because you want something mundane that can be used in place of magical healing? Or do you want it to supplement existing magical healing in a party? It's important to consider exactly what you're trying to replace or supplement within the existing mechanics in terms of how your table plays before you can start adding to them. If you have a Cleric at the table that enjoys being the one people can rely on in the case a Restoration spell is needed, it may not be a good idea to offer other players a single feat that can replace their uniqueness. If nobody wants to be forced to pick a class with such options, so you have no such characters at the table, it may be a good idea to literally just add the effects of such spells if the party truly needs them.

A new idea I just thought of would be to eliminate the healing portion of the feat altogether, keeping the 1 hp stabilize action, and instead allow a use of a kit charge during a short rest to maximize hit dice recovery. This obsoletes the Durable feat, but I never see anyone take that anyway.


Thoughts?
Personally I feel the Healer feat is intended to keep the party going a bit longer between combats before they need to perform a short rest, so that's along the lines of what I'd try to stick with if I needed to rebalance it. As mentioned by Ashrym, the fact that you never see Durable is an indicator it's one that needs to be reviewed, so maybe you can adjust Healer to give such feats/abilities more power without stepping on their toes.

Maybe have the Healer feat allow people to recover Hit Dice without having to take a short rest. For example, they heal the normal 1d6+4+1/HD, but it also allows them to spend some number of their Hit Dice to recover more when that part of the feat is used. This would allow a person with the Healer feat to provide additional bursts of healing during dungeon delves where the party may not be able to take an actual short rest, while not overpowering the amount of healing that can be performed throughout a day that provides more readily available short rests.

If this seems overpowered in your combats, perhaps impose a limit on the amount of HD that can be spent if you're not able to spend at least 1 minute tending their wounds, or perhaps go with feats like Inspiring Leader or spells like Prayer of Healing and just require 10 minutes of downtime for the party to do it. You could even add some relevance to the Medicine skill and make it so that a player cannot grant more Hit Dice per use than points they have in Medicine.

If all of this seems under or overpowered because your table provides short rests whenever they're needed, perhaps grant it the ability to restore Hit Dice that players have already spent, allowing it to boost their natural healing throughout the day by increasing the amount of Hit Dice that can be spent between long rests. Many people seem to forget you only get half of your Hit Dice back per long rest, so this could be quite a boon to higher level characters. This could go with the same types of limitations if it proves to be overbearing, like being limited in some way by the Medicine skill, or just putting some type of solid cap based on level.

There's a million and one ways one could probably balance mundane healing, so this is just some food for thought.
 

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