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5E hexblade curse damage bonus with multiple damage types

auburn2

Explorer
Hexblade curse gives a bonus to damage equal to proficiency. How do you apply that if there are more than one damage type and a creature has immunity or resistance to one of them?

example - rapier attack with hex: 1d8 PIERCING + 1d6 NECROTIC + dex/str PIERCING + curse ????

ice knife: 1d10 PIERCING + 2d6 COLD + curse ???

booming blade with whip: 1d4 SLASHING + str/dex SLASHING + xd8 thunder + curse ??? .... when he moves does he get another curse bonus for the xd8 thunder damage, is this thunder?

My going in assumptions are this should be one of two ways:

1. The player chooses the damage type from those that are used in the attack
2. It is always radiant or necrotic (players choice)
 

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doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Hexblade curse gives a bonus to damage equal to proficiency. How do you apply that if there are more than one damage type and a creature has immunity or resistance to one of them?

example - rapier attack with hex: 1d8 PIERCING + 1d6 NECROTIC + dex/str PIERCING + curse ????

ice knife: 1d10 PIERCING + 2d6 COLD + curse ???

booming blade with whip: 1d4 SLASHING + str/dex SLASHING + xd8 thunder + curse ??? .... when he moves does he get another curse bonus for the xd8 thunder damage, is this thunder?

My going in assumptions are this should be one of two ways:

1. The player chooses the damage type from those that are used in the attack
2. It is always radiant or necrotic (players choice)
If I’m not mistaken, the wording makes it part of the weapon damage?

<going reading>

Okay, so, the damage bonus definitely applies to the damage roll, which I would imagine means it’s of the same type as the main damage roll of the attack. However, because it’s a magical effect, I’d also imagine that the extra damage is always magical, so mundane sword + HC would be mundane slashing damage +proficiency bonus magical.

I Think. It’s late.
 

It says "a bonus to damage rolls", which implies the damage type is the same as that of the weapon, prior to any additional special effects.

There is nothing to indicate that this damage is magical, although in practice it doesn't matter - it's unlikely that they hexblade will be using a mundane weapon.
 

Benjamin Olson

Adventurer
Choose from the damage types you are using. It's the solution that interpolates the least in the way of additional rules into applying the ability.

I don't know what basis there would be for making it radiant or necrotic if they weren't there already. It would probably just come out and say "add your proficiency bonus in radiant or necrotic damage" if that was the case.

If it were Hunter's Mark, where it is specifically for a weapon attack I'd say the basic weapon damage logically should determine the spell damage type, even if the weapon had some sort of other damage rider, was used with Booming Blade, etc. But there is no consistent basis for what the "core" damage is with all things that trigger Hexblade's Curse damage. It's not just weapon attack damage, it's whenever you're rolling damage against them. So it seems like the choices are "interpolate in a bunch of assumptions about how it was supposed to work" or just let the player pick which damage die (and hence which damage type) they are attaching their proficiency bonus to.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Technically the weapon damage die and the 1d6 necrotic damage are separate damage rolls, so under a strict technical reading they should both benefit from the Hexblade’s Curse’s bonus damage. But I doubt that’s the design intent, and I would rule that it applies only to the weapon damage roll (dealing the same type of damage as the weapon).
 

dnd4vr

The Smurfiest Wizard Ever!
My going in assumptions are this should be one of two ways:

1. The player chooses the damage type from those that are used in the attack
2. It is always radiant or necrotic (players choice)
For reference:
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You gain a bonus to all damage rolls, whether by weapon or spell. The bonus damage type is not specified. So...

#1. Whenever a feature does additional damage and that type is not specified, you can choose from any of the types of damage your attack is doing.

This is a sage advice ruling. If I have time later, I will try to dig it up but don't right now.

example - rapier attack with hex: 1d8 PIERCING + 1d6 NECROTIC + dex/str PIERCING + curse ????

ice knife: 1d10 PIERCING + 2d6 COLD + curse ???
In the first example, the curse damage can be either piercing or necrotic; in the second example either piercing or cold.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
booming blade with whip: 1d4 SLASHING + str/dex SLASHING + xd8 thunder + curse ??? .... when he moves does he get another curse bonus for the xd8 thunder damage, is this thunder?
Not really related, but the whip+booming blade thing sounds interesting until you realize that booming blade is only 5ft, so you can't take advantage of the whip's length (or any reach weapon). Knowing that, i don't know why anyone would choose a whip with that combo.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Choose from the damage types you are using. It's the solution that interpolates the least in the way of additional rules into applying the ability.

I don't know what basis there would be for making it radiant or necrotic if they weren't there already. It would probably just come out and say "add your proficiency bonus in radiant or necrotic damage" if that was the case.

If it were Hunter's Mark, where it is specifically for a weapon attack I'd say the basic weapon damage logically should determine the spell damage type, even if the weapon had some sort of other damage rider, was used with Booming Blade, etc. But there is no consistent basis for what the "core" damage is with all things that trigger Hexblade's Curse damage. It's not just weapon attack damage, it's whenever you're rolling damage against them. So it seems like the choices are "interpolate in a bunch of assumptions about how it was supposed to work" or just let the player pick which damage die (and hence which damage type) they are attaching their proficiency bonus to.
It’s adding extra damage to an attack, and doesn’t specify a damage type. That means it is of the same type as the attack, but is magical regardless of whether the attack it, because it’s a spell effect.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Technically the weapon damage die and the 1d6 necrotic damage are separate damage rolls, so under a strict technical reading they should both benefit from the Hexblade’s Curse’s bonus damage. But I doubt that’s the design intent, and I would rule that it applies only to the weapon damage roll (dealing the same type of damage as the weapon).
I don’t have time to double check right now, but is damage roll not clarified anywhere to refer to all the dice your roll for damage for a given effect?
 



Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
They’re both part of the same damage roll, just like anything else that adds dice to a damage roll.
It doesn’t add dice to the damage roll, though it says,

You place a curse on a creature that you can see within range. Until the spell ends, you deal an extra 1d6 necrotic damage to the target whenever you hit it with an attack.

So, the effect of the spell is to deal 1d6 necrotic damage (a separate damage roll from the 1d8 piercing damage or whatever from the weapon) whenever you hit the target with an attack. The weapon’s damage roll isn’t even mentioned in the effect at all.
 

jmartkdr2

Adventurer
Not really related, but the whip+booming blade thing sounds interesting until you realize that booming blade is only 5ft, so you can't take advantage of the whip's length (or any reach weapon). Knowing that, i don't know why anyone would choose a whip with that combo.
There's a few ways to deal with this: RAW, the spell sniper feat applies to the cantrip, doubling it's range to 10 feet. The Distant Spell metamagic also works, although it costs points each time and can't be used with most other metamagics.

Rogue + whip + BB can be pretty nasty, but it's rather tricky to get rolling.

Houserules that might apply include the dm letting the spell's range equal the weapon's reach because why not, or a custom magic item to overcome the limit.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
It doesn’t add dice to the damage roll, though it says,

You place a curse on a creature that you can see within range. Until the spell ends, you deal an extra 1d6 necrotic damage to the target whenever you hit it with an attack.

So, the effect of the spell is to deal 1d6 necrotic damage (a separate damage roll from the 1d8 piercing damage or whatever from the weapon) whenever you hit the target with an attack. The weapon’s damage roll isn’t even mentioned in the effect at all.
It doesn’t need to be mentioned, it’s what the effect of the spell is. It’s all one damage roll.

While the above is consistent with the rest of how the game works, I can’t find any definite specific wording on what counts as part of an damage roll. That said, the idea of soemthing that adds damage being it’s own damage roll seems like a very long stretch, in terms of RAI or RAW.
 
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Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
It doesn’t need to be mentioned, it’s what the effect of the spell is. It’s all one damage roll.

While the above is consistent with the rest of how the game works, I can’t find any definite specific wording on what counts as part of an damage roll. That said, the idea of soemthing that adds damage being it’s own damage roll seems like a very long stretch, in terms of RAI or RAW.
It’s literally a separate roll though. It has to be, or there would be no way to distinguish the necrotic damage from the weapon or spell damage.
 

Davo3

Explorer
It’s literally a separate roll though. It has to be, or there would be no way to distinguish the necrotic damage from the weapon or spell damage.
I use different colored dice for different types of damage when it makes a difference.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
It’s literally a separate roll though. It has to be, or there would be no way to distinguish the necrotic damage from the weapon or spell damage.
That doesn’t follow. There is no reason that they need to be separate damage rolls to be distinguishable for effects relating to damage type.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
That doesn’t follow. There is no reason that they need to be separate damage rolls to be distinguishable for effects relating to damage type.
If there’re the same damage roll, how do you decide how to split up the damage between the types?

EDIT: To illustrate, One damage roll might be be 1d8 + 1d6 piercing and necrotic damage. But this doesn’t indicate how much of the total is which type of damage (unless you want to say it’s all both, I guess, but that would raise some questions about how damage with multiple types interacts with weaknesses, resistances, and immunities). 1d8 piercing damage and 1d6 necrotic damage clearly indicates what damage is of what type, but it is two separate rolls.
 
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doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
If there’re the same damage roll, how do you decide how to split up the damage between the types?

EDIT: To illustrate, One damage roll might be be 1d8 + 1d6 piercing and necrotic damage. But this doesn’t indicate how much of the total is which type of damage (unless you want to say it’s all both, I guess, but that would raise some questions about how damage with multiple types interacts with weaknesses, resistances, and immunities). 1d8 piercing damage and 1d6 necrotic damage clearly indicates what damage is of what type, but it is two separate rolls.
That doesn’t demonstrate what you claim it does, though. The individual things that are added to the damage roll tells you what dice are what damage type. That doesn’t interact at all with the question of whether they’re one damage roll or two.

The only thing I can think of that is actually separate is effects that add damage when you crit, because they specifically add damage that is outside of the crit, and thus separate from it. If an effect instead adds to the damage toll directly, it is part of that damage roll.
 

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